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"No sé qué pedir."

Translation:I do not know what to ask for.

5 years ago

53 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Melita2
Melita2
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I do notr know what to order = is accepted.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/krow10
krow10
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Thanks! I was wondering if it would be, but was too timid to try it. My mother's rules for English, pounded into me over the years, had me not wanting to end that sentence in a preposition -- but my fear of having to start the lesson over made me do it!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JonkunKotona
JonkunKotona
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YSK that ending a sentence with a preposition is perfectly acceptable, and in some cases actually preferable (such as when the alternative sounds really awkward).

http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/words/ending-sentences-with-prepositions

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ZinC19
ZinC19
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"When the alternative sounds really awkward". Not to Yoda.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
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Some references say "to ask for" is verb + preposition, but it is clearer if we consider it as a phrasal verb; that is "I ask for", "you ask for", etc.

If you want to avoid appearing to end the sentence with a preposition then you can always use "to request".

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/13371453
13371453
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Why is there an acento needed on the "que"?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Melita2
Melita2
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This in an indirect question, not a quote, i.e. a direct question. Indirect questions require an accent just as a direct question would.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GaelBraxton

Metita2: Please explain how "I do not know what to ask for/what to order", can be labeled as an indirect question. It looks like a statement to me. Someone is passing information to or telling someone else that they do not know something (in this case 'what to ask for or what to order'. If the sentence read "What shall I ask for?", that is a question. Known in English grammar as an 'interrogatory sentence' or a sentence that asks a question. I've looked up direct/indirect question. Direct question: 'What is he doing?" Indirect question: "Do you know what he is doing?' Direct question: "What do you want? Indirect question: "Can you tell me what you want?" Both Direct and Indirect questions ASK a question and all the example sentences end with a question mark. Duolingo has not put a question mark in front of this sentence or at the end of the sentence as is the rule in written Spanish. So evidently Duolingo does not consider this statement of a fact to be a question.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kirsten637255

Indirect questions are questions that we ask by including them indirectly within another sentence. We use them to add information to certain expressions such as the ones below.

Examples:

Yo no sé …

Él pregunta ...

Yo no entiendo ...

A ella le gustaría saber ...

¿Me podría decir ...?

No te voy a explicar ...

Sentence Structure

Sentence structure of indirect questions is different from that of normal questions – the finite verb and the subject don’t switch places. So, after the question-word, the rest of the sentence is the same as in normal declarative sentences: question-word + subject + verb + object.

However, even in indirect questions, the question-word is used with an accent.

Example:

¿Cuándo tiene (él) tiempo? → No sé cuándo (él) tiene tiempo.

¿Es (ella) feliz? → No te voy a decir si (ella) es feliz.

For indirect questions, we generally use a full stop instead of a question mark (see example above). We only use a question mark if the indirect question is part of an actual question.

Example:

¿Me puede decir cómo se llama esta calle? The "cómo se llama esta calle" is an indirect question that is part of an actual question.

This information came from this website: https://espanol.lingolia.com/en/grammar/sentence-structure/indirect-questions

For more examples of indirect questions, check out this website: https://www.thoughtco.com/orthographic-accents-in-statements-3080304

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/13371453
13371453
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As knowledgeable as always. Thanks Melita! :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lynne650325

Having read the responses, I guess those of us who are keen on English grammar will just have to remember that it's an interrogative in Spanish! I'm feeling rather grumpy about this, but as they say, 'En México, no hay reglas ficas!" ¡Ja ja ja ja!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MMP6070
MMP6070Plus
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Why is there an accent on "que" when it is not a question?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LICA98
LICA98
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qué=what

que=that

it actually doesn't even matter whether it's a question or not

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Katzenperson
Katzenperson
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I really wish this question were upvoted more. It was something bothering me, and I had to scroll through a lot to find it. I hope that it gets upvoted a little more so that it is easier to find, as I am sure I am not the only person wondering about the accent mark.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Blas_de_Lezo00
Blas_de_Lezo00
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"Qué, cuál(es), quién(es), cómo, cuánto, cuándo, dónde" have accent when they are interrogative (direct or indirect).

"Que, cual(es), quien(es), como, cuanto, cuando, donde" do not take accent when they have other function.

"Debaríamos comprobar antes quiénes van a venir"

"Quienes lo rompieron deberían pagarlo"

"No sabes cuánto te hemos echado de menos"

"Es muy generosa, siempre te da cuanto tiene"

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JeersMPGA
JeersMPGA
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I have seen a lot of people use 'lo que' in place of qué. Can it be used here?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ignatznkrazy
ignatznkrazy
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"Lo que" is closer to "that which."

No puedo describir lo que vi en la calle esta mañana.

which is an example from http://users.ipfw.edu/jehle/COURSES/relpron1.htm.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jamesw0906

Good question. I was wondering the same thing.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mariano-M

100 % legit

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mamajo2

It sounded like he said bebir. I like the woman voice. I can't understand the man

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/skepticalways

Mamajo2, this time I missed it because I couldn't figure out what the woman said, either! She sounded as if she said, previr. I usually catch the "th"-sounding "d," but not this time. :-(

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/keyboardo

"I do not know for what to ask" is a fine English sentence. I have reported this configuration as an alternate solution.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Katzenperson
Katzenperson
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It is a fine English sentence indeed, but «pedir» would not be the best word to use in translation.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/keyboardo

Ah, technicalities! I would not have thought of that discrepancy myself, for I was lost in the syntax of the English sentence. Thank you!

Would "No sé para qué preguntar" be the proper structure for my proposed solution? Since the preposition "for" is already implicit in "pedir," I may want to use "para... preguntar" instead for my current translation. This adjustment might allow me to split the preposition and its object into two separate words while avoiding a redundancy.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bdbarber
bdbarber
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It may be a proper English sentence, but, personally, I would not call it a fine sentence. It is very awkward.

3 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/glazewg

I didn't want to end the sentence with a preposition for the English translation. But, I also didn't want to lose a heart. So, I put what Duo was looking "for." But, would have, "I do not know for what to ask," have been accepted by Duo?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AurosHarman

It is perfectly legal to end a sentence with a preposition in English. People who tell you otherwise are spouting nonsense, up with which you should not put. :-)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/krow10
krow10
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Yeah but years of training are hard to break! I avoid ending a sentence with a preposition when I can, but I never criticize anyone (except my mother and sister -- who are sticklers) for doing it themselves.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/constructionjoe

To leave off the 'for' is to change 'pedir' to 'preguntar'. If you have reservations against ending the sentence in 'for' then use 'to order' (i.e. from a menu, contextually) in place of 'to ask for'.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dee29724
Dee29724
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I left the "for" out and it was accepted

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ashley2446

Does pedir mean "to ask" or "to ask for"?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Andreaja69
Andreaja69
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'To ask for'

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dcmorgan78

I'm hearing an "r" in the middle of pedir, as if it were "predir", which I'm pretty sure isn't a word. Problem with the audio, or problem with my ears?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/skepticalways

dcmorgan78, That's what I said above! I didn't know the word, but typed it to hear what it really was.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/antiderivative

2017/07/18 Audio is not playing (it's not lag) on this sentence when you "Type what you hear" in Chrome on Windows 8.1.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Pedro.Ronaldo

What about "I did not know what to ask?"

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/skepticalways

Pedro.Ronaldo, I THINK that would have to be stated, No sabía qué preguntar, in Spanish past tense, because of the "did." In English, "Did" would function as the auxilary verb, and would take the past conjugation of the verb "to do," used with the PRESENT tense of the main verb. Please, more advanced learners, correct me if I have made any errors in my offered Spanish translated sentence.

Some in the forum have suggested preguntar would be better if you only say "to ask" (like questions), instead of "ask for" (like an order at a restaurant, for example).

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/itaneri
itaneri
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i couldnt hear the audio

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Andreaja69
Andreaja69
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I'm not sure it's very helpful to comment on your audio on this discussion board, as there is very little we can do about.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lynne650325

I don't see it as a question, indirect or otherwise. It's just a statement of fact.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Andreaja69
Andreaja69
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It is an indirect question.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KennethD.R

Sound is a little rough on ¨pedir.¨

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Derek802630

I dont know how to ask - not accepted 05 2018

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Andreaja69
Andreaja69
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'Cómo' es 'how', pero 'qué' es 'what'. 'I don't know how to ask' = No se cómo pedir'. 'I don't know what to ask'= No sé qué pedir.'

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/brbert02
brbert02
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Is that a legit Spanish sentence? it seems unnatural to me

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/droma
droma
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"pedir" = "to ask for" or "to request"

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/brbert02
brbert02
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ya i know pedir is to ask the structure of the sentence just seems difficult to me i want to add like a para but thats probably just trying to apply english grammar to español

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AurosHarman

"Pedir" is like "to order" (at a restaurant) or "to request". As a translation of "to ask for", the "for" is already embedded, you don't need a separate preposition.

If you're translating, "I don't know what to ask," as in, you're struggling with what question to ask first, you would use "preguntar", not "pedir".

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/crrrivers

"Request" not accepted in multiple choice question.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AurosHarman

They definitely should accept "request" as a translation of "pedir" here; I hope you reported that.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/guelen13

Yes brbert

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Tim294818

Where's the 'Yo' in that sentence?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Andreaja69
Andreaja69
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It isn't necessary to use subject pronouns in front of Spanish verbs unless for emphasis or to clarify a sentence.

11 months ago