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  5. "De paarden lopen door het wa…

"De paarden lopen door het water."

Translation:The horses walk through the water.

March 22, 2015

18 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Wouter677343

to walk = wandelen, to run = lopen, both for the Netherlands and Flanders, but in the Netherlands 'lopen' is also used for walking. Why is to run incorrect?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Andy_dw

I should be! It's getting to me that Duo doesn't accept these answers!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/amish_dexter

May I know Why "is walking through" not accepted?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/El2theK

Paarden = plural


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Vagelis684493

'Door' is translated as 'through' or 'by' ,but in this case it gives different meaning. 'Walk through the water' and 'walk by the water' is two different meanings.What else could we use here?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sesc79

To be clear, a literal translation using "by" – The horses walk *by [i.e. next to] the water – would be incorrect here.

In essence, "door" always means "through". When it is translated as "by (means of)", as in the passive voice, that's an abstract use of the concept "through": think "X is done by Y" ~ "action X is passed through tool/agent Y".

Sometimes "door" can also be translated "throughout", as in "door de week".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/YavorNushe1

I put right order sentence acording you , and stillsais -wrong!!??


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zanafer

So is the word door = through related to the English door as it lets you walk through rooms? lol just saying


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Henry3languages

The horses are walking along the water? (If it's a river for example).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sesc79

Without further information, that implies they are walking next to the river. The Dutch original here has ambiguity in the other dimension – the horses are clearly getting their hooves wet, though it's only implied that they are crossing, not following the water.

To describe with the least amount of ambiguity that the horses are walking in the water parallel with the current, I'd probably use "in" in both languages.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EnricoClem2

The voice is clearly saying "de water". I listened thrice because I remembered "het" but then trusted duolingo and got an error. Reported


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/El2theK

The voice clearly says 't/ut water, which is the common way het is pronounced in speech.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EnricoClem2

Now from my PC, yes. In the app it does not clearly say that, it clearly says "de".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/El2theK

It's the same audio file that's used, so perhaps it is an issue with your speaker.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/andreiten

I have never seen a horse walking. Maybe there is a verb more suitable. Like "traben" in german.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sesc79

What would you call the slowest gait, then, if not "walk"? German "traben" is moving in the next faster gait, "trotting".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Frigooss

I had some doubts, too, how I here should translate 'lopen' in English. I wrote 'The horses GO through the water', and it was marked wrong, of course.

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