https://www.duolingo.com/Emmers_1n1d

Sombrero, salsa, queso?

So I've always been told that sombrero is a type of hat, salsa a type of sauce, and queso a type of cheese dip.

If that didn't make sense, it's like this- calling all sauces Ranch or something like that.

So is sombrero a type of hat or spanish for just "hat" Is salsa spanish for "sauce" or a type of sauce? Same goes for queso but I think I'm understanding that one now.

Please help! Thanks

3 years ago

17 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/El_Gusano
El_Gusano
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Well the problem is that those words and their meanings in your head have been gringoized. Sombrero just means hat. It's English speakers that decided that Sombrero meant the type of wide brimmed hat that is typical in Mexican stores. But it doesn't. Salsa has always meant sauce. It's English speakers that decided that salsa means Mexican hot sauce with tomatoes, garlic, peppers, etc. But it doesn't. And queso has always meant cheese. It's English speakers that decided that queso is only a type of dip. But it isn't.

Hope that clears it up!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Aero02
Aero02
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Very true, it's applicable to a lot of others cultures..

&

(It's mainly a lack of knowledge on the matter)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/superdaisy

Great response. Do you--or anyone else!--know of equivalents in English? What gets used in an overly-specific way abroad when it's a general term in America, or the UK, Australia, etc?

This is an interesting article about "authentic" vs "American" salsa that gets at the distinction being asked.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lizsue
lizsue
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I know that "spaghetti" in English is a loan word from Italian for a particular kind of noodle, and "spaghetti" in Italian is less specific about exactly which noodles it includes (it even appears on some Chinese food menus in Italy).

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/superdaisy

Ooh, good example.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lizsue
lizsue
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Thanks! :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Cruise2525

There are so many different types of pasta with different names. Do the different names reflect the ingredients or consistency?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lizsue
lizsue
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Good question! I know that example, but I don't know the language myself. Maybe you could ask at https://www.duolingo.com/topic/519 (the discussions for the Italian for English speakers course)? :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AlejoPF
AlejoPF
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In Spanish "spolier" is used meaning "information that you are given about what is going to happen in a film/movie, television series, etc. before it is shown to the public". But as far as I know, it's got more meanings in English.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lizsue
lizsue
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You're right, "spoiler" has more meanings in English - see https://www.wordnik.com/words/spoiler . :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dcarl1
Dcarl1
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Just because the US calls a particular style of saucy dip "salsa" doesn't mean that is the only thing called "salsa". "Salsa" means (any kind of) sauce. "Sombrero" means (any kind of) hat. Our Mexican-influenced cultural overlay doesn't change the totality of the Spanish language.

PS - When I was in Spain last month I often saw "salsa" and "queso" on menus referring in no way to the Tex-Mex meaning of "salsa" or "queso." I saw clothing shops offering "sombreros" that were beanies, fedoras, berets, and the like.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MaggiePye
MaggiePye
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Are you speaking English or Spanish? Because the English word "sombrero" (which is obviously a loan word from Spanish) refers to a specific type of hat, but the Spanish word "sombrero" is the Spanish word meaning "hat." Same thing with "salsa" and "queso." As Spanish loanwords in English, they have narrower meanings, generally "the type of [thing they mean in Spanish] that English speakers associate with a Spanish-speaking [usually Mexican, for US English] culture."

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lizsue
lizsue
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Likewise, maybe "peynirli" in Greek is the name of a particular cheese pastry that Greek speakers associate with Turkey?

In the comments on https://www.duolingo.com/comment/7710403 OHGODIAMNO says "...And as these words spread over space and time, they often adapt different usages. Whereas peynirli means cheesey in Turkish, in Greek in means only one very particular cheese pastry."

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/chaered
chaered
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This (borrowing in a restricted sense) happens a lot with English technical (e.g. computer) jargon. It can cause confusion when a non-native speaker then uses one of those terms in English, without context or qualifiers, expecting it to have that specific meaning only.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TatianaBoshenka

What???? Salsa isn't salsa and sombreros aren't sombreros? Next you'll tell me Nachos are a nickname for Ignatio! =D

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pabos95
pabos95
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Another case is "cafeteria", in spanish is a place that people attend during the coffe hours and take a lunch.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Emmers_1n1d

Thank you everyone for your answers!

3 years ago
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