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"Neem je melk of sap?"

Translation:Are you taking milk or juice?

0
3 years ago

25 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/CrimsonRaven47

Is "Do" an essential part of the translation ?

3
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/34Dell17

It is grammatically correct, in english at least, to have it in questions where 'take you' (or similar inversions) do not make sense.

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Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CJ.Dennis
CJ.Dennis
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English requires the use of a modal verb such as "do" or "have" when forming questions, unless the main verb is "to be".

  • Is he happy?
  • Does he like juice?
  • Has he eaten already?
  • Must he sit there?
  • Where will he go?
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Reply7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Thorin96
Thorin96
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No one says "take" like this in English from my experience as a native speaker, so I really don't like the literal translation that is required here.

2
Reply7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/catnepeta
catnepeta
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It's used at about the same frequency as "are you having...?" in my experience. Perhaps it varies from region to region, but it is used.

1
Reply2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KurtusC
KurtusC
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So is the Dutch "neem" similar to the Spanish "toma," as in that it can mean to take AND to drink? Or is it entirely different in Dutch?

1
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hedi76
hedi76
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La traducción exacta es: ¿Tomas (quieres) leche o jugo? Tomar (beber) es drinken.

0
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/olia.bn
olia.bn
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Is "would you like milk or juice?" incorrect?

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Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/xMerrie
xMerrie
Mod
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Yes, that would be 'Wil je melk of sap?'.

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Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ShikerWolf

ok, this is the second time they asked me to translate this sentence. First time they corrected me saying that it was " are you talking milk or juice?" and now I try it and it doesn't work. Why?

1
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hedi76
hedi76
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"Are you taking milk or juice" would have been accepted.

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Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ShikerWolf

Oh!! I read it as talking not taking. Thanks

0
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hedi76
hedi76
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I really liked your sentece. Two new languages for Duolingo! ☺

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Reply11 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ShikerWolf

lol took me a few seconds to get that XD. I guess you were talking milk.

1
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/WafelJongen
WafelJongen
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This is quite an odd sentence for me; I'm not sure if I've ever heard anyone ask "Do you take..." in the context of asking what someone wants to drink. I think most people would just ask "What would you like to drink--milk or juice?" (I'm speaking as an American who's lived in California, the Midwest, and New England.)

Of course if it's a common phrase in Dutch then it's certainly worth learning.

1
Reply1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SeanMeaneyPL
SeanMeaneyPL
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That encapsulates my thought exactly. I take milk with (or in) tea, but I don't "take milk" full stop.That's not the idiom. But, of course, if the Dutch do, then so be it.

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Reply1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TobyBartels
TobyBartels
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Does this have the same idiomatic meaning as in English?

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Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Susande
Susande
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Edit: Correction, it can have either the literal meaning or the same idiomatic one. When someone you are visiting or someone buying you a drink asks this question, it will have the idiomatic meaning.

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Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TobyBartels
TobyBartels
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‘What do you take with your lunch, milk or juice?’. Or even more commonly: ‘What do you take with your coffee, milk or sugar?’. If you want it in the progressive aspect: ‘Yesterday you took milk with your coffee, but the day before you took sugar; what are you taking today?’.

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Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Susande
Susande
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I don't understand, what's the idiomatic meaning? I just read some choice between milk or juice and milk or sugar, no figurative meaning.

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TobyBartels
TobyBartels
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It's not very idiomatic, but you're not actually taking anything, it's just being put in there for you. I would normally use the word ‘get’ in that case, and ‘take’ gives a refined high-tea kind of quality to it. (That may have something to do with my being American.) And actually, in this question, I wouldn't even say ‘get’ but would probably say something like ‘want’.

If I were to translate these words ‘take’ and ‘get’ into German, they'd be ‘nehmen’ and ‘bekommen’ (but not ‘holen’). I don't know what the equivalent of ‘get’ is in Dutch, and for all I know Dutch doesn't distinguish these meanings as finely.

There's also an issue with tenses; this question is asked before you get anything, and so it shouldn't be in the present tense in English, yet it is. That may not be an issue in Dutch (it wouldn't be in German).

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Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Susande
Susande
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Ah got it, I didn't realise I do know the idiomatic meaning. :)

So a correction to my first remark: yes it can have either the literal or the same idiomatic meaning. (When one is visiting people it will usually be the idiomatic one.) Although I think doe je melk of suiker in je koffie? (similar idiomatic meaning) or especially wil je melk of suiker? are used more often, so similar to using want in English. Which form is used more often in Dutch probably also depends on the region.

Get in the meaning of receiving is krijgen (= bekommen), this is never used in these kind of sentences. FYI nehmen = nemen, holen = halen. I'm pretty sure usage of these 3 words is (almost?) identical in Dutch and German.

And indeed using the present tense before you get anything is not an issue in Dutch, in sentences like neem je melk of suiker?, it's even odd NOT to use simple present.

5
3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alec.slyter

This translation has more idiomatic similarities to British English in the same way you might say, "Do you take sugar with your tea?" Less frequently used these days in American English, but used more in some parts of the country.

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Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/perkyrainbow
perkyrainbow
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I keep using "jij" and "je" wrong. They sound the same to me on Duo. Are there rules to when which is used? I know they mean the same thing, and that one is more casual speech.

0
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/asafih3
asafih3
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I'm not sure, but I think you can always use both, and the reason Duolingo says you're wrong is because you had to type what you heard, and it said "je" and not "jij". Same thing happened for me.

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Reply2 years ago