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https://www.duolingo.com/Shortwayz

La madrugada

Duolingo insists on calling "La madrugada" dawn! However it is not! La madrugada are "the very small hours", the hours (roughly) between midnight and dawn. Or am I mistaken?

3 years ago

12 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/rocko2012
rocko2012
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A google image search of "la madrugada" will gives some images that do look like they are before dawn and some that look like dawn. And http://www.spanishdict.com/translate/madrugada suggest madrugada has both meanings. "las tres de la madrugada" = "three in the morning"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Denfisksson

Madrugar = To wake up early.

For some people this will mean to wake up at 5, for others to wake up at 9. So it's a bit subjective.

Madrugada (For me) = The period of time between 1-2AM until the hour you'd wake up the following day.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nicoqk
nicoqk
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Madrugada = 01:00hs a 05:59hs

Mañana = 06:00hs a 11:59hs

MEDIODIA= 12:00hs a 12:59hs

Tarde = 13:00hs a 19:59hs

Noche = 20:00hs a 23:39hs

MEDIANOCHE: 00:00hs a 00:59hs

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AlejoPF
AlejoPF
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I thought Spaniards were the only ones who said 7 de la tarde (even sometimes it's 8 de la tarde)... Assuming you're from Argentina (because of your Boca Juniors picture), this is due to seasons, right?

Here in Colombia (I thought in the rest of LatAm as well) the noche starts at 19:00hs.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nicoqk
nicoqk
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Hola Alejo.

Efectivamente, estoy en Argentina. Y si, aquí decimos "las 7 de la tarde", para referirnos a las 19:00hs. En cualquiera de las cuatro estaciones del año. La noche comienza a las 20:00 (aunque durante gran parte del verano a esa hora aun haya sol..)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Klgregonis
Klgregonis
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I love this word. The wee small hours or 0 dark 30 are the best translations I can come up with in English. Does anyone have others? I first encountered it when talking about daily schedules in my ESL class - someone wanted to know if we had a word for a person who got up before dawn, and gave me madrugador as the Spanish word they wanted to have translated.

Edit - I'd like to add another word I love - trasnochar - which is to stay up all night. It has trasnochador, trasnochada, etc. just like madruga/madrugar does.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Adina_atl

The wee hours is how I usually think of it, but "0 dark 30" is another good one. For a person who gets up really early: early bird, morning person.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/remoonline
remoonline
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Now, I know two things.

  • I am definitely not a madrugador
  • Trasnochador, now that's more like it :)
3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/m.tastic
m.tastic
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Yo también. :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CatherineJenny

Me gusta porque hablas como un poeta

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Adina_atl

I've seen madrugada used a number of times in the Costa Rican online newspaper crhoy.com and it's almost always been an accident, volcanic eruption, or earthquake between about 1AM and 5AM. It seems to be used primarily to avoid the ambiguity that English has when you speak of "Tuesday night at 2AM"--do you mean the 2AM before Tuesday's noon, or the 2AM after Tuesday noon?

At least in Costa Rica, at least in this one newspaper, 8PM to midnight is "noche", midnight to 1AM is "shortly after midnight", 1AM to 5AM is "madrugada", 5AM to noon is "mañana."

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Shortwayz

Thanks everyone for the response! This for me indeed confirms that it is not dawn, not sunrise, but the period before that.

Muchas gracias a todos

Edwin

3 years ago

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