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"A friend just lost her job."

Translation:Une amie vient de perdre son emploi.

5 years ago

30 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/SteveKamyszek

Why is vient in this sentence?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lucy615
lucy615
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It's the recent past tense. It would be great if duo would give it a clear introduction! http://french.about.com/od/grammar/g/recentpast.htm

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/n6zs
n6zs
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As lucy says, "vient de" is one way of saying that the action happened in the recent past. It is the counterpart to the "near future" using aller + infinitive. Notice that in English, it is stated in the past tense, but preceded with the word "just". There are several ways to do this:

  • Je viens de perdre mon emploi = I just lost my job
  • Il vient juste de commencer l'école = He just started school
  • Elvis vient à peine de partir le bâtiment = Elvis just left the building
2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lukman.A
lukman.A
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[QUESTION]

Is it also correct to say, 'j'ai perdu juste mon emploi '?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/n6zs
n6zs
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The adverb "juste" would be placed immediately after the conjugated verb, so: J'ai juste perdu mon emploi. http://context.reverso.net/traduction/francais-anglais/juste+perdu

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nqmpdj
nqmpdj
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Je pense que ces phrases n'ont pas la même signification que la traduction "je viens juste de perdre mon emploi"où "juste" accentue l'idée que l'action s'est passée très récemment. Dans " j'ai juste perdu mon emploi" ( ou j'ai perdu juste), "juste" ici précise la nature de ce que j'ai déjà perdu: ici "seulement" mon emploi et rien d'autre.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/n6zs
n6zs
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Merci. The many examples shown on the Reverso site include both interpretations but mostly those of a recently past action. Could you take a look there and comment, please? [Edit: apparently the examples shown on Reverso Context are incorrect].

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nqmpdj
nqmpdj
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Hi n6zs, Honnêtement, je ne vois pas de phrase utilisant un verbe au passé composé accompagné de juste ( j'ai juste perdu...) pour traduire une action très récente. On peut par contre remplacer aisément dans ces phrases le mot "juste " par "seulement" ou "simplement" ou " je n'ai perdu que..." Le présent " je viens de" suggère déjà l'idée de l'action récente et le mot "juste" renforce encore la notion "très récente"

Attention, ceci est mon interprétation, je n'ai aucun diplôme de grammairien et je suis pas professeur de français non plus. Par contre, je vais demander l'avis de l'Académie française et vous tiendrai au courant de leur réponse..

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nqmpdj
nqmpdj
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OK, peut-être que les phrases anglaises citées signifient de façon évidente pour les anglophones que l'action vient de se passer, mais la traduction française donnée ne me paraît pas naturelle. Comment traduisez vous par exemple: "j'ai juste descendu une petite marche et je viens de me casser la jambe ?" qui signifie de façon évidente pour moi " je n'ai fait que descendre une petite marche et je viens de me casser une jambe". Ou encore " je viens de rater une marche mais j'ai juste été un peu déséquilibré ( j'ai été juste un peu déséquilibré). Qu'en pense Sitesurf ?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/n6zs
n6zs
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I understand the issue. Sometimes what appears on Reverso is not absolutely reliable. Merci, nqmpdj!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nqmpdj
nqmpdj
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Don.t mention it. I only hope you find my argument valid

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/n6zs
n6zs
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You are correct nqmpdj. I have consulted our "authority" who confirms that using "J'ai juste perdu...." would be interpreted as "just" in the sense of "only", not in the sense of a recent action. So the examples found on Reverso are not really correct. Thanks for bring this up for clarification!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/n6zs
n6zs
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Hello, lukman, I have been informed that "J'ai juste perdu...." is not correct so I must withdraw my comment. Although I found quite a few examples that used that expression to refer to recent past, it is apparently not right.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lukman.A
lukman.A
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Ok, I have also read the comments. Thank you sir, it is clearer to me now.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/paysrouges

Thank you for this elucidation, n6zs. I agree with Lucy615, DL should have introduced as a topic; I was indeed confused. I just wanted to add that in UK English we put in an extra verb to indicate recent past. So we would say, 'I've just lost my job', 'He's just started school' and 'Elvis has just left the building'. Without this, the meaning of the word 'just' might be mistaken for 'merely'.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/n6zs
n6zs
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And all of those variations are accepted (with "have/has" as appropriate).

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LINHARS
LINHARS
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Avoir + infinitive? You mean aller + infinitive? Je vais acheter la voiture = I am going to buy the car.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/n6zs
n6zs
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Of course, I must have been on automatic pilot there. I have edited my note.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LINHARS
LINHARS
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Nice to know that you are still here.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LINHARS
LINHARS
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'Venir de' means that something has just happened. Juste in this sentence cannot be right. The suggestion is 'juste' and 'venir de' is not mentioned. I have never seen this construcion in Duolingo before, and without any hint it was impossible to know that this was expected in the answer. I have been through all the French tree and I haven't seen it before here. I wrote 'Une amie a perdu son travail juste maintenant.' This was of course not accepted.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ariaflame
AriaflamePlus
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The suggestion I see here has vient juste de so it does have venir de, just with the juste in there, though the juste isn't strictly necessary.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kvargman
kvargman
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Could you say "Une amie a récemment perdu son boulot" ? This was marked as wrong.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CJ.Dennis
CJ.Dennis
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« Récemment » means "recently" which could be last week or last month. I wouldn't say someone had just lost their job if it was a month ago. I also wouldn't say "recently" if they lost their job today.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/eylemfr

Whay i can not use metier instead of emploi? Just want to know that Can i use that also?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nqmpdj
nqmpdj
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My job (mon travail, emploi) is to do what I have learnt to do (mon métier)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CJ.Dennis
CJ.Dennis
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Think of « métier » as meaning "profession", "speciality" or "trade".

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rkilberg

what's wrong with, "un copain vient de perdre son boulot"

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Xanderificus
Xanderificus
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Gender. (I just got it wrong because I brainfarted on "her"). You'd have to say "une copaine". I also used "boulot" but don't know if it would have accepted that.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Elaine1947

what was wrong with putting friend in the masculine?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CJ.Dennis
CJ.Dennis
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This is tricky and it caught me out the first few times I had this sentence too! It's "A friend just lost her job", so it has to be « Une amie vient de perdre son emploi ».

1 year ago