"İç!"

Translation:Drink!

March 23, 2015

207 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rayslegend

hello everyone! welcome to turkish! first post!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Selcen_Ozturk

hello and welcome :) But please use the sentence discussion only for sentence related questions and answers in the future :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zfE96

Iwent to learn turkish


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BrianDavis648801

This is correct water


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ghanshyamp319086

विनोद कुमार


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ghanshyamp319086

ढथडक्षथ


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kai_E.

Interesting how it can also mean "inside" or "internal"... I wonder if the meaning "drink" is related to those, like ingesting a beverage.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/burak.duolingo

I think you may be on to something, Kai. If true, this would explain why we use "içmek" to refer to smoking as well as drinking. (In Turkish, we "drink" cigarettes, rather than "smoke" cigarettes). Maybe the people who came up with the word had a romantic idea of the smokes/fumes of the cigarette being "ingested" the same way water or other fluids are ingested.

Alternatively, it could be the way the word was borrowed from another language. Arabic, Gujarati, Urdu, Hindi also use "to drink" when referring to smoking. It's possible that we say "to drink" cigarettes simply because it's the way it was used in the language/culture we were influenced by.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Aneesa346164

I totally agree Burak! I am a native Hindi speaker and your theory sounds right to me! In fact, some words in Turkish are the same in Hindi/Urdu and that's what I love about Turkish! I'm sure those shared words come from Arabic or something. The pronounication and spelling is different sometimes, but the overall sound is the same. For example: duniya, insan, ask and ishq (hindi), selam etc.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ChiBegam

All of these are Persian also, Duniya=World , Insan=Human being , Ask, Isgh=Love , Selam=Hi , It looks likes these words works in this part of the world all together,


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Baselandroido

It is the other way around, all those words are of Arabic origins that might have affected both Turkish and Persian languages.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LelithLeli

World=Diyar, yeryüzü and alem Earth=Dunya(Not Duniya :D) Love=Sevgi Crush=Aşk(Not Isgh :D)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/janet_botanic

Hi. I am Turkish. World and earth both means dünya. Also: yeryüzü=world not. Yeryüzü=earth


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kate67478

I'm fully agree...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NaushadAhm878294

I agree with aneesa, even i love Turkish for the same


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pspai

In Marathi too we use "drink"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SyedMustyen

In bengali we also use the verb drink to say smoking cigarette.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VinoVirinoKanto

These comments are fascinating. I don't smoke, but it is amazing to think that another culture has a different conception of the very act of smoking , that I had no clue about before.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnahitaGupta

But then again drinking and eating have the same translation. Convenient for soup :p


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jesse523757

Why soup? Soup isn't even a turkish word (i think) so.......yeah, not so convienent. And it's not even the same translation though. So, yeah. Just forget this post. :-P


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/niss643858

No we say "i smoke"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Yougui5

يشرب سيجارة


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BaraaKhalaf

In Arabic also, we use "يشرب" "Yashrab" which means drink when we want to say "...smoking cigarettes."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GearGirlNani

I think of the hookah in referring to "drinking", because doesn't the hookah contain liquid?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/saliva7

Yeah, even in Korean "to inhale (a smoke/fume)" and "to drink" are the same


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Reiodex1000

In Arabic we also say "drink cigarettes" it confuses me too


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BartStif

Funny, in Italy there is an idiom saying "smoking like a Turkish" when someone smokes too much!:) so is funny to think this idiom could include iç in these two meanings, featuring an incorrect excess of smoking in Turkey! Btw I love Turkey soo muchh:))


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Eraj85598

In urdu also.. We use the word drink for smoking


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlexinNotTurkey

They are unrelated. One is a noun (that can also be used as a preposition), the other is the command form of the verb içmek


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Selcen_Ozturk

they might still share something though, you don't know how the words evolved :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/karrman

İç: v. drink; n. adj. inside.

İçmek: to drink.

I think 'içmek' was made up in the meaning of 'içe/içine almak' (to take in).

So I think you are right.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NoNameNoFace

Maybe it more literally means "put it inside you" haha


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/joefeyzullah

you may check www.nisanyansozluk.com or research dictionaries of andreas tietze


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/maryamfard1

When you drink something it goes "inside" your body.. so i guess this is why it is eused for the same meaning In all ligoes there are some words which have very different meanings.. it's not strange


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NealFisher

I suppose now would be a very good time to ask if there is a keyboard layout for typing in Turkish, or else an easier way to type characters like ç than using alt-numpad codes.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/somelauw

Currently I'm trying to use a compose key myself. The windows key on the right is a good option as you probably never use it anyway.

  • You can type ç by: compose, (comma), c
  • You can type ş by: compose, (comma), s
  • You can type ı by: compose, i, (dot)
  • You can type İ by: compose, I, (dot)

If you're on Windows, a compose key application can be found here.

Otherwise, just switch your keyboard layout to US-international, which let's you produce characters by AltGr combinations, but I don't know if it is complete.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ahnaqsh

Very nice. Thanks. :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BenWolski

If you're looking for a long-term solution, I recommend the Colemak keyboard layout. I had to practice for about a year to regain my QWERTY typing speed, but now it's very enjoyable. Colemak makes typing lots of international characters very easy: http://colemak.com/Multilingual


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bush6984

What I've done in the past with German, French, Yiddish/Hebrew, Spanish, and Polish, is set my Windows to have a Ctrl+Shift+[Number] as a keystroke for each language's keyboard layout. I use it to quickly toggle between whichever layout I want. I haven't (yet!) checked to see if there's a Turkish keyboard layout, but it may become my Ctrl+Shift+6 hotkey stroke.

Use "Keyboards" under I think it's "Region and Time" to check the settings to set your keystroke preferences to toggle.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FoghornJLeghorn

If your on your phone you can hold down the letter and drag your finger to the selected version of that letter it works with all my languages so far


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ant3hon3y

Go to your key board setting and add the layout. You will then have an abriviated form of the language tap to switch between the different layouts


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ulskie

On my phone, I use message ease keyboard where you can add different layouts and change them with one swipe.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tor_Heyerdal

Another solution besides the ones already offered here is to create a keyboard layout of your own. It's actually pretty simple with Microsoft Keyboard Layout Creator 1.4. Of course, if you go this route, you won't be able to use it on any computers that don't have your custom layout installed. Although I suppose you could always upload your created layout's installation files to Dropbox or something so that you can download it elsewhere.

https://www.microsoft.com/en-ca/download/details.aspx?id=22339


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/maryamfard1

Yes go to setting and go to the languages and type and choose turkish


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mohdabdula3

Download a turkish keyboard.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Icystrider

MNEMONIC for I.ç -- I had this terrible ICH in my throat, and I just had to make it better by DRINKING! ^_^


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/somelauw

My mnemonic is that it sounds similar to "eat" in English, so I remember that drink=ıç(eat) and eat=ye (yeah).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/karrman

You may want to use the word 'each' for better pronunciation. The word 'iç' sounds like the very short/quick pronunciation of the word 'each' like in the word 'it'.

So, it could be considered as a kind of mixture of 'each' & 'it'.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Icystrider

You're SO right.... sounds are important ... Thank you!! (^_^)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LelithLeli

Drink=İçmek eat=yemek :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BenWolski

ıç <-- what is the typo in this word? Perhaps the lack of capitalization or exclamation mark?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Selcen_Ozturk

ı and i are different letters in Turkish. we'll add a pronunciation guide soon.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BenWolski

Thanks! I understand now. One letter is distinguished by a dot, for both the lowercase and uppercase versions. This makes much more sense than English in which an uppercase "i" loses its dot.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

Yes, exactly! One letter is i İ, the other is ı I .


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bush6984

In many language courses, e.g French, Spanish, and Italian (I say those because I notice you've studied them) it'll count those as correct, but have the guide say "pay attention to the accents!"

From what you're explaining, are you saying that to a Turkish person comparing those two letters is akin to us comparing "a" vs "b" where there's absolutely no connection other than looking similar? I guess a better example might be "i" vs "j" because they both have a tittle.

Just trying to differentiate whether we're talking about accents or entirely, completely unrelated letters that just coincidentally look similar.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/johaquila

Obviously they are both vowels and not that different in pronunciation. But from what I have heard, distinguishing them is about as crucial as e.g. distinguishing e and i in English.

Confusing the two can have serious consequences: http://languagelog.ldc.upenn.edu/nll/?p=73


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bush6984

Wow! Sounds like it! Thanks for explaining, and for providing the U Penn reference!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

Perhaps like l vs. t?

After all, t is basically just l with a line through it, but they seem like completely different letters to English speakers.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/burak.duolingo

I and İ (or their lowercase counterparts, ı and i, respectively) are two separate letters in Turkish, and constitute two of the total of eight vowels found in the language. Despite the visual resemblance, these two letters are not accented versions of a single sound, nor do they sound that similar to one another.

The dotted İ/i is the same sound as the "i" in pin, win, sing, etc. Very straightforward.

The undotted I/ı is a sound that is not found in the English alphabet, but it is found in the pronunciation of certain English words. For example, if we were to write the word "Britain" the way it would be pronounced, but only using Turkish letters, it would be "Britın". Another example would be the verb "to pardon". Using Turkish letters to approximate the English pronunciation, this would be spelled "pardın". So the closest approximation is an "uh"-like sound. A last example would be the word "nation", which would become "neyşın". (It's tough to give examples without letting slip some other new material in. You'll notice that I also dropped in the new letter "ş", which has a "sh" sound, as found in "short", which in Turkish would become "şort")

As is the case with all Turkish letters, they are pronounced consistently, i.e. absolutely the same no matter where they appear in a word. This is in contrast to English, for example, where "i" can be "ee" as in "win", or "ai" as in "ireland", among others.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN

Careful: Sing does not sound like pin and win. "Sing" can have the "ee" sound, I have not heard "win" with that sound except from foreigners. http://englishspeaklikenative.com/resources/american-english-ipa/ https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/International_Phonetic_Alphabet_chart_for_English_dialects


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MarkBennett6

Which accent is this in? In British RP sing, win and pin have exactly the same vowel: /sɪŋ/ /wɪn/ /pɪn/


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlexinNotTurkey

That is definitely not that case in American English :) allintolearning is definitely representative of the English I speak.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN

Yes, my dictionary does indicate that these three words all have the short ' i ' sound, but there is often a slight difference in the words that end with 'ng' as opposed to the words that end in 'n'. I am from California. Try saying sin and add g then say sing and tell me if your vowel does not change at all. A good example is the word singe versus sing. Oddly singe has the short 'i' sound even though it ends with an 'e'.
http://forvo.com/word/sing/#en

http://forvo.com/search/pin%20win%20sing%20singe%20ring/


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

Phonemically, the words do indeed have the same vowel sound, but phonetically they are different.

Dictionaries usually write down the phonemes (distinctive sounds); slightly altered sounds caused automatically by their environment (e.g. a following -n versus a following -ng) are usually not marked as native speakers make those adjustment automatically and often unconciously.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tor_Heyerdal

In my dialect (I'm from Ontario, Canada; native English speaker), the words "Britain" and "pardon" do not have a vowel nucleus in the positions you indicate here: [ˈbɹɪt̚.ʔn̩] [ˈpaɹd̚.n̩]. And in my dialect, the word "nation" uses what you describe as Turkish's dotted-i vowel in this position: [ˈneɪ̯.ʃɪn]. This has the unfortunate consequence of rendering your explanation very ambiguous to me. lol. I'm sure your explanation was probably very helpful to some other people, though. Don't get me wrong.

Also, you say "where [English] "i" can be seen as "ee" as in "win"..."

I don't know of any English dialect that does that. Maybe somewhere in Scotland or something, but I'm pretty sure this is wrong for at least 90% of English dialects.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/S0R0USH

Is this strange looking "I" pronounced like "itch" or "each"?

Just need to make sure!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Andro0

i without the dot is like "uh"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alurianas

Say youuuuu continuosly and smile as hard as you can. That's ı. The ç is exact same of "tsch" in german.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MardiMonkey

Interesting! Thanks!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zht47

I have to say very good explanation.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ChiBegam

"I" pronounced like "itch"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JaggedToaster

is this commanding someone to drink?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NikAhmad

How can i type the character c in Ic?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MardiMonkey

It may have special characters below and if you press on those, they'll be part of the word. Hope this helps!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/david.oakford

Içmek also means to smoke, so my correct answer of 'Smoke!' was marked wrong.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlexinNotTurkey

Only if you include the o=word "sigara," "nargile" or various other smoke-able things in front of it. On its own, it will almost always be interpreted as "drink" :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/anastime

Esh is a half of Arabic word for drink: eshrub اشرب


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlexinNotTurkey

This word probably doesn't come from Arabic; however, some words involving drinking "şarab, meşrubat" do :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Strobro3

is this only when in the imperative mood?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SteffiBookworm

Important!
Please share a screenshot with me if your answer with İ was not accepted!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/New_Summer

I'm reviewing some of the basics, and would İç be the infinitive verb? I noticed there were other forms like içer.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Selcen_Ozturk

iç is so called the "stem" of the verb. infinitives are done by addition of -mek/mak. (içmek). Verbs are conjugated according to the person and the tense, please read tips and notes


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GeniusPolyglot

içer is an imperative form of the verb "içermek" to contain.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/YQes2

so is iç like a command like your telling someone to drink


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlexinNotTurkey

Yep :) And it is informal


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kucukorumcek

I translated with "Smoke!" and it told me I was incorrect :/ Is it?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlexinNotTurkey

Except in a few restricted contexts, "smoke' is "Sigara iç" (you can't drop sigara)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kucukorumcek

Thanks for your reply! :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MardiMonkey

Is it pronounced like "itch"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

Closer to "each", I'd say.

http://forvo.com/word/i%C3%A7/#tr has a pronunciation you can listen to.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MardiMonkey

Ah, thanks! Very helpful.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Winter606538

i thought it was icki


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

içki is a noun: an (alcoholic) drink.

iç! is a command, telling someone to "drink!".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ahmelq

i can't figure how to say it, is it like "ich" or "pitch" ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

Like "each", I would say.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SeyitKhamza

how Iç has inside mean ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

As a noun or adjective, means "inside" or "interior".

As a verb, içmek means "to drink" and iç! is the imperative or command form of that verb.

So you have two words that look the same: a noun and a verb.

Many languages have words that look the same even if they are not similar, e.g. "like" in English ("He sings like your cat" -- preposition; "We like your cat" -- verb).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HocineKentabli

please how to say drink water.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/danielingua

It feels like I'm being ordered around at dinner so far, "Ye! iç!"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/aabdurrauf

İ search in google translate, "iç" means "inner". So how can in this app "iç" means "drink"? Please tell me..


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lucaturilli

'İç(-)' means both inner and drink(stem of the verb). 'To drink' would be 'içmek'.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JuliaMVA

Içmek means the same? Whats the difference?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

içmek is the infinitive, the base form of the verb -- "to drink" or "drink". What you would look up in a dictionary, or the form used together with modal verbs such as "I want to ...".

iç! is the imperative or command form: "drink!"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SamanaAli1

what is the difference between iç and içer?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/joefeyzullah

iç is command and gerund. içer is singular 3rd person form.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sallystar27

I wish if there's a way on duo lingo to learn turkish from arabic❤. Teşekkür ederim!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sallystar27

Metci Gracias Tessekurler Thank you شكراً...=)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Laila510976

So "içmek" means "to drink" But "drink" is "iç" Just don't use the "mak" and "mek" Other examples: Yazmak- to writeYaz- write Oynamak- to playOyna- play Kesmek- to cut_Kes- cut If you wanna use it in a negative form use "me" or "ma" Okumak- to readOku- readOkuma- don't read Kaçmak- to runKaç- runKaçma- don't run Söylemek- to tellSöyle- tell___Söyleme- don't tell


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gullkhan2

I m a deaf person. I can't hear nor speak. So all speaking n hearing related tests i cant give.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sushinese

Is iç pronounced like the English word itch?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lucaturilli

Yes but 'i' is pronounced short.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AhmedKazem4

I think there are another word for "drink" which is içiyor. Is this right?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

içiyor means "(he/she/it) is drinking".

It's a different form of the same verb.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zht47

-yor makes continuous tense. iç-(i)-yor means He/She/It is drinking


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nick.simon

Its telling me to pay attention to accents. But im using ç is this the correct character?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Awesome74

Ye and iç - I like how they sound in English version of "yay" and "itch"

Btw, I'm new here, accidentally added on my course where I wanted to Japanese instead but sadly it's not loaded yet


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/joefeyzullah

Don't say that everywhere in Turkey as piç means bastard :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/saksham.an

In hindi too we use drink for ciggaretes also duniya is world insan is human and ishk is love in hindi


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JackMcCall15

when do you use ic/icersin/icerim/iceriz and any other words for drink


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/YasmineL8

Whats the difference between iç içer içeriz içersin içer and içerler???


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Abdinaasir12

I love TURKISH,may the ALMIGHTY ALLAH make easy for me......


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Reiodex1000

Why does Turkish contains more imperative sentences than other languages? Is it because Turkish people are so self-imposing?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/joefeyzullah

It's because imperitave and infinitive forms are same. And it can be distinguished by stressing for imperative and non-imperative in speech.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sharaschandra

I wrote 'Drink'. It was marked as wrong. The suggested correct answer was ' Drink'. Simply unfathomable!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Reza864683

It sounds like eat but means drink


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Eraj85598

I have tried to pronounce this word " iç " like 6 times but the app constantly showing that the pronunciation is wrong. It doesn't seem wrong to me then why?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SteffiBookworm

There is a bug that is currently being worked on. But every detail is still important. Which App do you use, which keyboard in case you do not use the system keyboard?
Can you share a screenshot when you get the error again?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Moody72536

عربي و النبي


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BbaTalarSvenska

In my very first lesson as a beginner, i get the following translation as the correct answer : Internal!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/_zxvqa_

Türkçe öğrenen Türkler kampı:)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Yaar593971

Ana dilim türkçe. Telaffuzumu kabul etmiyor. Akla ziyan bir şey.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KandemirEmre

çok kolay lan, hemen öğrendim


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HdrKara1

Ben aslında bir Türküm.Türk Türkçe öğreniyor :D Şakasına öğreniyorum


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alycia839219

Is it the verb drink, or an actual drink?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

Is it the verb drink, or an actual drink?

iç! "drink!" is the command form of the verb içmek "(to) drink".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ST.fanofjapan

Why does it sound like Itch?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/arsalansaidd

it is a command right?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/salma434685

Why is there an explanation mark at the end? Is it part of the word?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

No, it's not part of the word.

This is a sentence - a command. Such sentences are usually ended by an exclamation mark rather than a full stop.

"Eat! Read your books! Answer my questions! Drink your tea!" and so on.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/altagracia855605

Please, I need the sentences to be exact, for example words that are accompanied by I want an apple, I eat an apple. Thanks in advance!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jabraham0880

No puedo aprender turko en español así que estoy usando el poco inglés que sé para aprender algo


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Burhan427816

Whats the difference between iç and içer?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

Whats the difference between iç and içer?

Still the same as when SamanaAli1 asked this same question 2 years ago and received an answer. The language hasn't changed since then.

Please read all of the comments before asking a question.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/YasmineL8

Hi everybody love this app


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AminMamani

Yaşasin TiraxtuR


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/altagracia855605

Please, I need the sentences to be exact, for example words that are accompanied by I want an apple, I eat an apple.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tlh29

هاي ممكن نتعرف على لكل


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MerziyeHes1

Hello haw are you


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BeratcanDo

afferim size öğreneceksiniz gardass


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MaioySamyE

You must leaen alot of words


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SuadeBetl

I AM TURKİSH :) HELLO!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TikTok2.0

Can't do anything cause.little sis it is very annoying


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GiyL19

His own life of u


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LucyByrum

wow i'm so sorry must be hard.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/aasker59

No it is a easy


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ibrahim26508

qaqas pastfdhecgdggffhhugffggdfggg cat


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ReneMunoz16

tesukkkurederimadinizpostmal0neiniz ne?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Amirhosein49270

Hello guys, welcome to first turkish post


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Amirhosein49270

Hello guys, welcome to first turkish post

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