1. Forum
  2. >
  3. Topic: Turkish
  4. >
  5. "İyi geceler, görüşürüz!"

"İyi geceler, görüşürüz!"

Translation:Good night, see you!

March 23, 2015

37 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zamlet

It sounds very much like the speaker is saying "gecelar", not "geceler". Is it common for this word to be pronounced this way?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Selcen_Ozturk

it sounds correct, and I hear "geceler" :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zamlet

But you're a native speaker (I presume) and know what the word is supposed to be! :)

Pretend you don't speak Turkish and listen to the recording again. It sounds like the word ends in -ar rather than -er. That might be normal (and probably is), but it doesn't sound exactly like it's spelled to someone who isn't sure how the word is supposed to be spelled.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JohnWycliffe

To me (new to Turkish) it sounds more like gecelär/gecelehr than a full on gecelar. I can see the confusion, though.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/araruney

Ahh,a Swedish learner.I had some troubles learning Swedish,sometimes it sounds ˝ar˝ when it's ˝er˝ or vice versa,and can never guess whether it is ˝e/a/ä˝ in new words :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gypsybird

Selcen, have you ever noticed that sometimes, the "e" in Turkish sounds a little bit like the "ә" in Azerbaijani? I mean that it sometimes sounds more like an /æ/. In English, this sound is similar to the "a" in "cat". But of course, in Turkish, if you write the letter "a", it has a very different sound. I think the person was trying to say it sounds more like gecelær.

There is an interesting Wikipedia page on Turkish phonology (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Turkish_phonology)... The section on vowels shows that the "e" has slightly different qualities...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GilbertoRa168225

I was living in turkey and that was very confusing to me, my name is daniel, and they always pronounce it danial, its very hard to explain that to a native Turkish speaker. But i know what that person means, for a non native speaker the sound is "gecelar"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/aucunLien

Having been exposed to native speakers quite a lot now (without really learning much because they were all bilingual) I can tell you that this doesn't go away. The vowels are a bit different, as i guess they always are when you move to a new language, and it takes some time to adjust.

Words ending in -er or -ar, in particular, usually sound funny to my ear. I also usually hear a very faint "h" at the end of such words, but never got a native speaker to agree with me that hat is a real thing...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gypsybird

When you say you hear a faint "h" at the end of words that end in "-er" or "-ar", do you mean it sounds as if the "r" has a fricative quality? If so, it's normal. Look at this page http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Turkish_phonology#Consonants


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mahabln

The /e/ is a very open [ɛ], but it is not yet /a/


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PauloSanto801520

I once ha d along discussion with a native Turkish speaker about the word "defter" he claimed that both Es have the same sound, but for me the second E is almost an A.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Truthxsaber

Doesn't see you mean the same thing as bye? I wrote good night, bye!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlexinNotTurkey

"see you" implies that you will be seeing each other again :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/woolleypenguin

Not quite. They are interchangable but different


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/staplesnout

What is literally, word-by-word translation of "görüşürüz"? I suppose it is the verb "görüşmek" (to meet, to see each other) with 1st person plural ending? Without literally translations it is so hard to learn this "phrases" section. I hate to learn by heart things which I don't understand exactly.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Maryam344437

Geceler means nights , but in translation comes good night .What is the reason?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jordy
  • 1072

It's just idiomatic. Compare to "congratulations" vs. "congratulation" in English. :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/XMVZiron

Holy mother of Umlauts


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/esalesky

Would you use iyi geceler earlier in the evening than iyi akşamlar? Is that the difference?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlexinNotTurkey

İyi geceler means good night. It is said when parting with someone at night time or when you are going to bed


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/.Storr.

Maybe it's just me, but somehow I had problems with understanding the TTS pronunciation of görüşürüz. Here are some samples of how real people pronounce it: http://de.forvo.com/word/g%C3%B6r%C3%BC%C5%9F%C3%BCr%C3%BCz/#tr


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ricardo.aprende

görüşürüz is the coolest turkish word i've learned so far! :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/isa--c

Does see you basically mean see you later


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlexinNotTurkey

Yep :) They are interchangeable


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/darkdynamite

How can we grammatically decompose the word "görüşürüz". Does it writed as a noun or a verb, and what does concretely mean the suffix ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Waterip0

Nice the lesson ends with this


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nico.Porti

In İyi the y sounds like /j/ as in "you" in English and the c in geceler sounds like /dʒ/ as in "jet"? Am I right?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/victork06

Yes. You are quite right.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Aya666038

Turkish is very nice I love it so But the pronounciation is hard


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Fiorella222267

gece means nite so geceler nights... iyi geceler good nite i am not sure why is wrongthen?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jordy
  • 1072

"Nite" is not an accepted spelling in standard English. Try using "night" instead.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/qixyl
  • 1212

ru: "Спокойной ночи, до встречи!"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hsn626796

Is geceler .. plural ? nights ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JohnWycliffe

Yes, it technically means "the nights" since it's the definite plural form. I don't know why.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JuergenZirak

If it is common/usual/the only possibility in Turkish to actually wish good nights/days/mornings (the plural form), then I wonder how you emphasize something like "have a few good days (in your holiday, for instance)"? By adding an indefinite quantifyer like in the English example?

Learn Turkish in just 5 minutes a day. For free.