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"¿A quién debería llamar?"

Translation:Whom should I call?

5 years ago

92 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/LICA98
LICA98
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Whom

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jar30pma23

Yes. Absolutely. Whom!!! This error drives me nuts!!!!!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alfalfa2

In contemporary English, "whom" is going the way of "shalt", "thou" and "thither." Prescriptive grammar is useless if it doesn't reflect current usage trends.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
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Not in my book alfalfa2? And thou is still used in many dialects including my own.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LilDawg730

¿de dónde eres? nunca he oido alguien decir "thou".

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AnthonyFlo627122

"Thau" y "thee" son palabras muy viejo. Nadie he hablado así desde ~1600AD. Aunque en aquellas dias ingles tenía mas formas por los pronombres. A veces, lo creo sobre ingles viejo para entender algunos cosas en español. Lo puede ser muy util para los que se hablan ingles.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Casiquire

I still use whom all the time. When appropriate, of course.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BishopLynx

"Who" may be an error but a convenient error that will never go away.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alfalfa2

You are probably right. I have worked as a copy editor, and agree with rogercchristie that the grammatical distinction between who and whom is simple and clear. When editing formal publications, I would certainly stick with his prescription. But like all living languages, spoken English is evolving. Scholarly descriptive grammars (e.g. Charles C. Fries' The Structure of English) document the gradual disappearance of the use of "whom". Some members of the Society of Friends (Quakers) and a few other sects still use terms such as "shalt," "thou," "thither" and the like, but that usage has all but disappeared. "Whom" is making the same transition. It hardly appears in modern plays and novels unless the author is trying to somehow characterize the speaker. This is happening even if rogercchristie and I would wish it not so.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vanw39
vanw39
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I, too, have worked as an editor (amongst other diverse endeavours) and, although I view much of the change in our language as devolution, I recognize that view as nothing more than opinion whilst your exposition on linguistic evolution is rife with facts, with which I cannot, in either good conscience or hope of success, disagree. (You're right. Sigh...)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
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Thank you for your kind words alfalfa2. Sorry I was a little blunt earlier. I was getting tired.

Yes, I think it is a backward step to lose "whom"; especially when "y'all" and "gotten" seem to be in the ascendency in some areas. But you're right, languages change despite our preferences otherwise.

Ah! The Quakers. I guess they are less fastidious about their English terms in my area. We do still have a lot of English dialect in the UK and some of the old words are hanging on. Still, some trends seem to be circular rather than linear, so I'm hopeful "whom" will make a comeback.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alfalfa2

Actually, until about 300 years ago, "gotten" was the preferred participle in British English. We colonists just kept it and you didn't I guess that makes us more linguistically conservative !? ;-)

Inflections tend to disappear from a language as word order takes over. Since English sentences usually start with the subject, we instinctively use the subjective form "who" at the beginning of a sentence like "Who did you give it to?" The same shift also occurs from time to time with sentence objects. Consider the exchange: "Knock, Knock. Who is it? It's me. Can I come in?" At least nine out of ten people wouldn't say "It's I." Nobody would say "I am it." (But they would in German!)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Texas1964

Okay, I think I agree with all of the above, rogerchristie. EXCEPT, while "gotten" is a word that doesn't seem to add anything to the English language, "y'all" is INCREDIBLY useful.

I grant you that it had its origins in the Deep South of the United States, which is considered "hick" often by the rest of the English-speaking world. Putting it politely, it rose out of a dialect, but don't all words? As a true Southerner, I shall defend it until the day I die.

There is no plural you of which I am aware, other than y'all currently in use in the English language. Like Ustedes or Vosotros, it conveys a non gender-specific plural form for you. (Or,it could also be considered as the contraction form for "all of you" which really does not trip off the tongue.) So in that case, it might be more like Uds. or Vos., but also orally. I will grant you, that some use y'all when referring to only one person; at these times I flinch.

So I hope that gives some clarification to "y'all." And to you, rogerchristie, who truly does speak the Queen's English, I wait for a response. And hope that I neither tease, nor doth protest, too much. This I shall enjoy, since I am whom one might call only a lowly plough boy. (I always have to pause to figure out whether to use "whom" or "who" and still mess up the dratted thing half the time.) Cheers!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jfGor
jfGor
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We in American English say 'have gotten'. I have heard that in British English it is 'have got'. Here 'gotten' is the past participle of 'to get'. As in I have gotten (or got) a dozen replies so far.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Texas1964

Lol

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/elizadeux
elizadeux
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Vaya! Vaya! I'm happy that they accepted "whom" (object) for "a quién."

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/peskaj

Ghostbusters probably

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/aryahmmr
aryahmmr
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I can't believe no one wrote this down earlier!!! YESSSSS!!!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tylerthehun

There's no reason for this to be marked wrong with he/she/you without further context. Also, why does it suggest "would should" and "would must" as definitions for deberia? These make zero sense.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FelipeMiranda09

"Debería" used in a question without context implies that you are talking about yourself.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mattnag
mattnag
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Speaking of further context, there's no reason for what to be marked wrong?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tylerthehun

"Who should I/she/he/you call?" It could be any of those, but only 'I' is accepted.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ge08ge
ge08ge
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"Who should you call" was accepted on October 22nd 2014

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jfGor
jfGor
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I got 'who shall I call?' 23/Aug/2015. I think it should be 'to whom shall I call?' or 'To whom should I call?' because it is using the conditional tense and I don't know why.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pneuros

This is confusing a lot of people (including me), but I think the problem is that there is a subtle distinction between:

"¿A quién llamaría?" = who would I call?

"¿A quién tendría que llamar?" = who would I have to call?

"¿A quién debo llamar?" = who (unconditionally) should I call?

"¿A quién debería llamar?" = who (conditionally) should I call (IF something happens).

I think that there's just no good way in English to say "I would should"/ "I [conditionally] should", and that "shall" probably isn't a perfect translation. I think it could just as appropriately be written as "should" in English with a contextual understanding that it's conditional.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lulularosa
lulularosa
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ought

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PinkyGreen

How do you know it's I and not you/he/she or it?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KyleBotten
KyleBotten
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Agreed. This is one frustrating thing about spanish. I don't see why this isn't just "who should call"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/marcy65brown
marcy65brown
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That would make "Who" the subject of the question. The "A" before "quién" makes it "whom," the object of the question. Who should call? = ¿Quién debería llamar? Whom should I call? = ¿A quién debería llamar?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DaveDingal

"Who would I/he/she/it call?" should be correct since deberia is conditional right?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AdrianBrink

But who ever is making the call, shouldn't it be whom?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DeanG6
DeanG6
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Yes it should be 'Whom'.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jamesw0906

I agree. Who shall I call is in the future tense and probably should be translated by A quién llamaré?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Emerb

I have a problem with trying to recognise whether it is "I, she, you, him". I wrote "Whom should you call?" and marked wrong.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/wazzie
wazzie
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I put "Whom should I call" and it was marked correct, so "Whom should you call" should also have been marked correct.
7Mar15

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NedWhite

I agree totally. Duolingo must be more precise in their translations from Spanish especially to learners like me - ¡Necesitamos instrucciones más precisás!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Warao1
Warao1
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Debería, deberías, debería,deberíamos, deberían

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HermanaFlo2

Ghostbusters!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Tarleton25

Man I'm so lost with this verb mood.... Why is it debería?? Where does that conjugation come from?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jfGor
jfGor
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I believe they are using the conditional tense incorrectly. "Shall' is first person future tense. Deberé is first person future tense for 'deber'

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pastorsteve99

Ghostbusters!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Pigslew
Pigslew
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"To whom should I call? not accepted. Okay without "to"!! P.S months later - still not accepted despite reporting long ago.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
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Still not accepted 9/15. It makes we distrust the Spanish when the English is so often wrong!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
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Actually I have had second thoughts here. If you say "To whom should I call?" you would be changing the verb to "call to". I was tempted to translate the A to "to" too, but A quién is actually a Spanish phrase that means "Whom" in English.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Scherri

"Debería" could refer to both yourself (1st person) and someone else (2nd person polite and 3rd person) right? So "Who shall I/you/he/she call" should all be correct?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AdrianBrink

Whom . . .

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SMAGringo

This is NOT how I learned to use the conditional tense: Who should I call, I think, translates as A quién debo llamar....I can see some context where the Who Shall I call is correct if the question is posed to myself and I am wondering which of my friends or family I should call about something, The conditional, as I learned it was for the "would", so it seems to me the correct translation is Who WOULD I call...if..... Happily I did not test out on this lesson, and caught the "should" in the drop down.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SyamkumarR
SyamkumarR
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Cant this be the conditional "Whom shall I call if something goes wrong"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/billj6
billj6
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Why not debo?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SD-77
SD-77
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It says "Who shall I call?"! But in the suggestions for debería it says "would must"! I am a native English speaker, and "would must does not make any sense to me. So I wrote "Who must I call?" and it says wrong. I don't understand.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SusanSchre1

I have what is clearly a stupid question. Isn't llamar the infinitive? If so, why?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/wazzie
wazzie
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Llamar is in the infinitive form.
This is because, you can't have two conjugated verbs in the same clause of a sentence. The first verb in a string of verbs is always the (only) one conjugated. In this case, deber (debería) is conjugated, so llamar must remain in its infinitive form.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/divaluisa
divaluisa
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This is simple future, how can "who shall I call" be correct. Whom would I have to call? No?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Majklo_Blic
Majklo_Blic
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This is the first sentence I've ever seen on here where using the lowercase has been marked as a typo. Up until now, Duo hasn't cared either way.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GringoSolo

my native Spanish teacher tells me that "Who should call" is also correct. I asked after duo told me i was wrong and that the phrase is "who shall i call"

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
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Your Spanish teacher is wrong. "Who should call?" is ¿Quién debe comer?.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/marcy65brown
marcy65brown
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Or "llamar." :-)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
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Oh yes! Thank you marcy. Now why did I say that? (Maybe it was teatime!)

I am surprised no-one else spotted it. (It's a good job I didn't say ""¿A quién debería comer?" --- I guess that means "Who shall I eat?"! :-o )

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
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Some of these comments (including some of mine) have confused matters.
I assumed that DL's English was correct, but now I'm wondering: When did the conditional tense change from "should call" to "shall call"? I now think "Whom shall I call?" is wrong.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Luckaaa
Luckaaa
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Why not "Who should I call to?" Makes more sense than "Who should I call."

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bobtackett

Why not "Who should call?"

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/olimo
olimo
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Because of the "a". "Quien" = "who", "A quien" = "whom".

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/brainyblackgirl
brainyblackgirl
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Just had my sentence rejected:"to whom should he call?" Why is it wrong to use "to" in this sentence?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SMAGringo

Because it is not good English...It would be Whom should he call. the "to whom" requires a different context (to whom should I send this, for example)...to test, turn the sentence around and make it declarative: He should call: whom or to whom....

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jfGor
jfGor
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I think you are right 'whom' can't be the subject pronoun, as it is used indirectly.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Maxwell776587

Whom****. Learn English, duo lingo

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MaryGilles

Language is fluid. That is why we don't sound like Shakespeare today.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/reissecup

ghostbusters

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Yoshyahu

It should say "whom shall I call," because the object of the verb is the person being asked about. "Who" refers to the subject.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HughB_au
HughB_au
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Maybe it's an Australian English thing, but I was surprised that 'who do I need to call' was marked as an incorrect answer. I would always use 'need to' rather than 'should', even if it was less a requirement and more a suggestion. And I personally wouldn't use 'whom' ;)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Stephanie95

Ghost busters

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/logotha
logotha
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To whom should i call..i wrote ...who should i call to? As it was the nearest i could get but it didnt accept it despite TO being the first word???

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/abigail.gi

Ghostbusters

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MontReyher

Al chapulín colorado (?)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sojournerbliss

I am curious why you all think it would be whom. In my knowledge - whom would only be used in cases like. To whom shall i give the mic. With whom will you dance tonight. But when the verb dirctly applies to the object of the sentence. Who seems more correct. Like in this case. Who shall I call? You should, Tony. Whom could be used in this case. Receptionist: to whom shall i send the call? Tony: You should send it to anyone other than me. Does this sound correct to anyone else?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RenHowlter

Miguel Angel Gomez Galvis, "aprendientes" ni siquiera es una palabra gramaticalmente correcta, mucho menos la traducción para "learners", primero aprende tu idioma antes de criticar sobre otro.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jen1442
jen1442
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WHOM!!!!!!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Elin10921
Elin10921
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Yes. It should be "Whom shall I call", not "who".

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/stachys

English grammar is wrong: whom!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Warao1
Warao1
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EKS5UH is code,please join club

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Warao1
Warao1
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Deberia simply refers to (should,shall)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Carolyn217
Carolyn217
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"Who should I call" is not accepted!! Why?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/violin1616

Though this is the literal translation, "who should I call?" makes much more common usage sense

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Gigi190411

I thought i was supposed to translate the word, or phrase...

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/iidah
iidah
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Well that depends; is there something strange in you neighbourhood? Or did you just meet someone, and it was crazy?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/WelcomeToMyName

Yes yes

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Benzy911
Benzy911
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Whom... to who...

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TobyBartels
TobyBartels
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I don't use ‘whom’ in casual speech, but it seems as if it ought to be used when next to ‘shall’, which I also don't use in casual speech.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NesutNeter

It drives me NUTS this guys dialect. Is there a way to isolate to the woman's voice?

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LX40d
LX40d
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Spell whomstve

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/martinlus
martinlus
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GHOST BUSTERS!

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lucalu4
lucalu4
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A mí me ha marcado como error "Who should I call to?" , pero no me fío mucho. ¿Algún nativo podría decirme algo al respecto? Gracias.

2 months ago