https://www.duolingo.com/HebrewLearner

One interesting thing that I noticed about the Turkish Language

Hebrew and Turkish both come from the middle east ,so there are bound to be a few similarities and I happened to stumble upon one in lesson 1! I found out that in Turkish the word ve means and. In Hebrew, the prefix ו (pronounced ve) also means and! I wonder what similarities are next....

3/23/2015, 9:13:56 PM

42 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Selcen_Ozturk
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It is also in Arabic, and this is where Turkish borrowed it from.

3/23/2015, 9:20:09 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/MaxwellSchneider

In Arabic, it's "wa", no?

3/23/2015, 10:45:10 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Soroush94
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yes It's wa( = و )

3/23/2015, 11:05:14 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/OHGODIAMNO
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Indeed, but it is still the Arabic word. Turkish doesn't have a w in their language, so whenever they borrow a word that has w is becomes v. aywa-evet (the taa marbuta is always pronounced as t in Turkish)

Additionally, with only one k, every qaf becomes k. waraq/awraq - varak / evrak qadi - kadı

Gheyn becomes either k/g/ğ ghaugha - kavga

dhal dhad and dad all become z ramaDan - ramazan

tha becomes s masala (مثلا) - mesele

The last two rules are present in Egyptian dialect of Arabic, which a familiarity with would also help. Their word for "today" actually uses the Turkish locative! نهار=day/midday today= النهاردة the -da is the turkish locative, so it's 'at day'

fun stuff

3/24/2015, 6:27:04 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/HebrewLearner

Cool, I didn't know that

3/23/2015, 9:41:52 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/OHGODIAMNO
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Wait for that moment where you realize that the arabic aywa (ایوه) and the Turkish evet are the same word for yes. I only figured that out when studying Ottoman Turkish.

3/23/2015, 9:36:47 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Soroush94
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And "hayir" and the Persian "kheir" !

3/23/2015, 11:06:28 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/OHGODIAMNO
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and üste in Turkish and usted in Spanish all being from Persian for master! استاد

3/24/2015, 6:31:30 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/Soroush94
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Isn't it from Arabic "ustadh"?

3/24/2015, 6:57:24 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/OHGODIAMNO
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the Arabs got it from Persian, adopted it into their language through contact, and then as they spread spread it to Spain, so it was Persian filtered through Arabic.

A lot of Arabic words in Turkish are primarily filtered through Persian actually, since Turks entered the Abbasid caliphate for centuries before making their own long lasting empires. Much of the Turkish bureaucratic words that date from before the Tanzimat reforms in the mid 19th century stem largely from Persian.

Guckenberg, in the case of Arabic Persian and Turkish, these are all loan words and not root words. Arabic is a semitic language, Persian is indo European, and Turkish is Euro-altaic. As such, there are no common root words from a shared ancestral language. There are tons of common words though because after migrations, these languages were in contact for centuries, so people started using the same words. You will also see similar loanwords in languages like Greek, Serbian, Albanian, etc.

3/24/2015, 7:21:56 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/Soroush94
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Thanks for such a valuable information. have a lingot "استاد" :)

3/24/2015, 7:26:39 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/sambadojazz

I was watching a Turkish TV series with English subtitles on Netflix, and I kept hearing what sounded like Portuguese that fit the English translation of what the characters were saying. tá bom, então, and a few others. I thought I was imagining it. :)

2/16/2019, 1:19:48 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Guckenberger1
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Perhaps all may share what may be referred to, within certain English dialects, as a common "root" word. The theory of Darwinian evolution applied to language, yes!!!??

And, I gave you a "lingot!" Thank you for contributing!

3/24/2015, 7:14:13 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/Soroush94
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It is much more like the egg and the chicken dilemma to me and I love discovering these similarities! Thanks a lot!

3/24/2015, 7:23:29 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/TheYvdW
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The explanation about the etymology of the Turkish üste, could be true. I don't know.

But most Spanish dictionaries give a completely different, more convincing explanation for "usted". Usted is derived from "vuestra merced" meaning "your mercy", a formal way of addressing people that is also present in other Romance languages of the Iberian peninsula - most notably Portuguese "vossa mercê". "Vuestra merced" developed into "vusted" and later into "usted", "vossa mercê" into "você" in parallel making it unlikely it came from Persian via Arabic. Some sources (in Spanish), http://elies.rediris.es/elies22/cap73.htm (estudios de lingüística del español), http://lema.rae.es/dpd/?key=usted (real academía española).

A bit digging did yield results for the 'Persian' theory so to speak, but on the site of Instituto Cervantes they dismiss that.

1/18/2018, 10:33:23 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/-ZVEZDA-

it is not arabic look at this http://www.nisanyansozluk.com/?k=evet&x=0&y=0 it came from old turkic yemet→emet→evet there is a lot of sound similarities between languages and words but it doesn't mean they have the same origin

4/23/2015, 8:06:55 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/OHGODIAMNO
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Linguistic borrowing doesn't go only one way. The Arabs could have just as easily (and probably did) borrow it from the Turks. (The formal word for yes in FusHa, modern standard Arabic, is na'am. Aywa is concidered colloquial).

4/24/2015, 1:31:28 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/-ZVEZDA-

maybe you are right its probably borrowed from turkish to arabic

4/24/2015, 9:53:53 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Tvistnek

I assume that as a speaker of Serbian I will find a lot of loanwords from Turkish (and therefore also indirectly from Persian and Arabic) which will be familiar to me, no? I can think of quite a few everyday words which are certainly taken from Turkish (tašna, torba, dušek, burek).

3/23/2015, 10:09:16 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Alternia
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Turkish is also similar to Japanese in the way that verbs appear on the ends of the sentences.

3/23/2015, 9:41:50 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/AlexPolyglot
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I cant wait for hebrew, a really lovely language, hope to be adde soon to the duo's languages.

3/24/2015, 3:16:18 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/Hamzeee

And Arabic.

3/24/2015, 3:27:10 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/Ahmed2.15

I love Hebrew too :D

3/24/2015, 6:08:29 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/leonig01
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I don't expect too much similarities, as Turkish comes from turk language family, as opposed to semitic Hebrew. As a Hebrew speaker, who studied some Arabic at school, I can't wait until they add Arabic.

3/24/2015, 11:32:44 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/airelibre
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Anothere one - mühendis (engineer) - מהנס (mehandes)

3/24/2015, 6:36:05 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/iainsona
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... and 'va' is pretty common for 'and' in several other Middle Eastern languages ...

'adam' is probably the most well known one between Hebrew and Turkish ...

3/24/2015, 7:10:35 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Guckenberger1
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Cognates!? Wonderful! :D

3/24/2015, 7:10:40 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/airelibre
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Adam and אדם (adám) both mean man. Also, apparently tebrik is related to the root b-r-k, whence mabrook and ברוכים הבאים.

3/24/2015, 12:59:35 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Ahmed2.15

Semitic word, it is in Arabic too

3/24/2015, 6:09:54 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/CallumRoy
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Kitap 'book' is from Semitic origins too, right?

3/27/2015, 5:15:42 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Ahmed2.15

Yes it's Arabic "kitab", I don't know if it is in Hebrew or Syriac, Hebrew and Syriac are older than Arabic, Syriac is older than them, some people believe that Syriac is the first language spoken on earth, and it is still spoken in some places in syria.. I would love to learn Syriac it has a lovely script..

3/29/2015, 6:52:20 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/leonig01
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In Hebrew "book" = "sefer", yet the verb "katav" means "wrote", and is used to build many book-related meanings. So it definitely has semitic origins.

3/29/2015, 8:09:53 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/Ahmed2.15

yes we say sefer too but we don't use it for book, sefer is "Stone tablets" which are used for writing on them, we say "katab" instead of "katav", for example "yaktub" means "writes" kitab actually means "a written thing" if you want to say letter in old arabic vocab you can say "kitab".. interesting, I would love to know about syriac too..

3/29/2015, 10:42:32 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/leonig01
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I can't wait till Duo introduce arabic and hebrew here, will be interesting :)

3/29/2015, 11:33:46 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/Ahmed2.15

Actually, Hebrew is on its way.. check the incubator :D

4/1/2015, 4:10:39 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/BryanAJParry
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Turkish and Hebrew are not related. But they share some similarities due to being spoken in a similar-ish area.

3/23/2015, 10:39:30 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/no.name.42
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I don't think that the OP said that Turkish and Hebrew are related.

3/24/2015, 1:04:52 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/BryanAJParry
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I was merely clarifying. :)

3/24/2015, 9:22:55 AM

[deactivated user]

    It's cool that you noticed this as well! :) there seem to be a few similarities in vocabulary between the two.

    3/24/2015, 10:49:08 PM

    https://www.duolingo.com/alguy27
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    and what about "adam"?! that's so cool!!!

    אין כמו עברית!

    3/25/2015, 3:23:32 PM

    https://www.duolingo.com/flootzavut
    Plus
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    So far the ones I've noticed were ve for Hebrew (obviously both borrowed from the same place), chai for Russian (ditto, and I know I spelled it "wrong", because the Turkish spelling has yet to stick,but you know the word I mean, right?) and o for Hungarian (neither my Hungarian nor my Turkish is good enough to be confident they mean exactly the same thing, but it was familiar enough for me to be quite excited heheh).

    I love spotting cognates - real or just in my head ;p - it's really fun :D

    3/26/2015, 11:25:39 PM

    https://www.duolingo.com/mohammadba21657

    and also Maalesef = مع الاسف in arabic

    1/6/2017, 5:57:37 PM
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