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  5. "Rica ederim."

"Rica ederim."

Translation:You are welcome.

March 23, 2015

30 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnCatDubh

Wait, what does ‘rica’ mean?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/burak.duolingo

"Ederim" comes from the root "et", meaning "to make happen".

Remember "içerim" (I drink) from the previous lessons? It is constructed as iç+er+im, with the iç being the root, -er making simple present and -im making first person singular.

Same here. Et+er+im (I make happen). Note that the hard "t" became a soft "d". This is a rule/lesson you'll learn later.

Now, back to the word at hand.

"Rica" means "request".

"Rica ederim", thus means "I [hereby] make [my] request happen". In more understandable terms, it's "I request".

What is it exactly that you're requesting? It's that the person you've helped not make a big deal out of your assistance. So it's short version of "I request [that you don't make a big deal of this]. It was my pleasure".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/staplesnout

It is an ideal explanation, thank you! If all phrases in this lesson had similar explanations and not only English translations which are often so far from the real meaning, it would be waaay easier to learn them. But, thank God, the comments section exists.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mus615010

That's what i call «an explanation» thanks


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Aisha860304

Nicely explained.. Teşekkürler


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mutotemiz

"rica" means "request". "rica ederim" can be translated as "I request", literally. But, this is the shortened version of "I request you not to mention it". So, it is a phrase for "no problem", "you are welcome", etc. And it is both polite and common in daily language. So you can use it everywhere.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zylbath

So, somehow like in German 'Ich bitte dich...'. 'I ask you...' (not to thank me for that)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rrlear

So "Rica ederim" wouldn't be used by a gracious host saying "Come in! You are welcome!" but more in response to a "Thank you for doing me a favor"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Selcen_Ozturk

yes. For welcoming people to your house use "Hoş geldin(iz)"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jrikhal

Hi,

Is it my ears or the first word is pronounced quite different between slow and normal audio?
Someone could confirm that the normal speed has the correct pronunciation?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Selcen_Ozturk

in the slow audio the first e in ederim is too long, so yes the normal audio is better


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jrikhal

Thx!
So my pb with first word's pronunciation comes from me. Good to know. ;)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Vortarulo

I didn't recognize the first word in slow speech, actually. It sounded almost like "jca" to me (IPA [ʒʤɑ]), while in the fast version I heard it as "rica", with an actual [i] sound. Weird.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jocelyn.Willi

What does Rica mean on its own?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Andro0

I only ever heard "bir şey değil" while I was in Turkey. Or maybe I did hear this and didnt know the meaning lol :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Selcen_Ozturk

"rica ederim" is just much more polite (not too formal though, you could say it to your friends)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/multilingt

That means "no problem or it is not a problem or not at all or it is nothing". In english we use them the same. Rica Ederim is a more formal "you are welcome" than, bir şey değil


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ataoldotcom

ederim seems to make things formal no? and in return, the preceding word is shortened. teşekküler vs teşekkür ederim


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mutotemiz

not necessarily. "etmek" (to do), "yapmak" (to make) and "olmak" (to become) are verbs which are used to derive more verbs from nominal words. They are some sort of "helping verbs" in these situations.

  • araştırma yapmak: to research
  • kaybetmek (kayıp+etmek): to lose
  • yemek yapmak: to cook
  • hissetmek (his+etmek): to feel etc...

so, "etmek" does not make things formal.

rica etmek: to request

and that is the short version of "I request you not to mention it". You simply say "I request..." and the other person understands what you request without you saying it.

in case of "teşekkürler" and "teşekkür ederim", it is very similar to "thanks" and "thank you" in english.

I hope that clears some things up. :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/burak.duolingo

"Bir şey değil" literally translates to "a thing not [is]", i.e, "this wasn't a thing at all". So perhaps the closest English equivalents are "it's nothing" and "not at all".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MarinaPhil1

"Ederim" - im - it is ending of Ben ( I am ) yes? Why we translate "You are welcome"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlexinNotTurkey

This is just a set phrase. It is better to just memorize this one :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MadihaMK

why is the a in Rica pronounced as an english i? It sounds like Riciy or ricai.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HikaRoto

i put "welcome" and it is wrong, it says that it sould be "please" what tha heek? i don´t understand...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alexandria094

I wrote "Rica ederim" and it still didn't accept my answer. Why?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alexandria094

How do I post a pic of this site not accepting my answers when they are correct? It's happened more than once and I have proof of it. Who do I send it to? Clearly The "Report" option isn't doing anything.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/1948PIERRE

???? Bug? Good answer and Duo says wrong


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jastam

Can I reply with " Rica ederim" to someone who says "teşekkürler" to me? Or is it just a reply to " teşekkür ederim"?

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