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"Onu bırakmalıydınız."

Translation:You should have quit it.

3 years ago

26 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/firatciftci

This sentence isn't really clear. It can be used as "to stop doing something" or "quitting something", but to a native speaker it sounds more like "releasing someone", as in releasing a hostage.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/upstean
upstean
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you are right. i think the right solution is "onu yapmayı bırakmalıydınız" for this translation

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LadyNurington

I think it will be clear to a learner on Duolingo who does not know the other meanings that could imply a hostage situation. I mean, what is a native speaker doing on Turkish for English speakers? :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/firatciftci

I feel proud to have my native language on Duolingo, so I'm just looking at the questions. :P The sentence just sounds weird to me, that's all.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LadyNurington

Oh, I didn't mean that you don't belong on this course. I'm glad you're going through it.

However, don't forget that you have a lot more depth of knowledge in a course that is for beginners. They wouldn't know the implied meanings you mention. On a literal translation case Onu bırakmalıydınız is correct for You should have quit it. I hope this thread of comments won't confuse non-native learners!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/spikypsyche
spikypsyche
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As a beginner, I'd like to say that without fciftci's note I would have thought "bir şey bırakmak" was a correct idiom for "to quit something" and would therefore have been mislead.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/modene1

Agreed. Regardless of our understanding, we should be learning the correct meaning - not what we mistakenly understand something to be. Imagine if we used this in real life. The Turks would think we are nuts.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/modene1

I do both trees. Turkish and English. It's quit insightful.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AyaA2
AyaA2
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teşekkürler :)))

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AyaA2
AyaA2
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What about : you had to "leave" him, her, it ??

:)))..

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/firatciftci

You had to leave him/her/it would translate to "Onu terk etmeliydin." in Turkish.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AyaA2
AyaA2
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But bırakmak also means to leave. Like: bırak beni = leave me. Isn't it??

Thanks :)))..

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/firatciftci

Well technically yes, but it doesn't really sound right. For example, "leave me alone" would be "beni rahat bırak". However, "he/she left me" would be "o beni terk etti". What I'm trying to say is that leave can translate to different words in different sentences.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AyaA2
AyaA2
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(((: Thank you fciftci :)))..

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/reenozkan

it does sound right.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/spikypsyche
spikypsyche
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Tense question - if -malıydı is "should have", what is "had to" as in "You had to quit it"?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/firatciftci

"had to" would be -malıydın.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gerbil67

now ın negatıves requiring "dı"... why do you need the personal tenses conjunctive "y" on the end of "malı" "y-ım" "y-ız" etc ıf the following letter is "d" and a consonant not a vowel... let alone have ıt put before the negative and not next to the personal tense.... have i got the reason for it the other way round?

Where would confusıon take place ıf you left out the "y" as its much easier to say the word without the y. Is it because if it was "meli" ıt sounds like "meliy"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SheridanZhoy

It shows up in other places too... If you're going somewhere by car, that's araba-y-la, but if you're sitting in a car, that's araba-da. I'm also a little confused about when the 'y' shows up.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/firatciftci

That would probably be because "araba-da" contains the "availability addition": "da". This addition means you are available in something, which in this context is the car. However, in the other example, "araba-y-la", the word "araba" is connected with another word "ile". In this context, "ile" means "with". It doesn't matter if you say "araba ile" or "arabayla", it's just a matter of how fast you speak really. To conclude, that's why there's a "y" in that word. I hope I made this clear.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/utavli542

"You should have stopped him." no accept

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/daadaadaaren
daadaadaarenPlus
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how would you say “you had to quit it” as opposed to “you should have quit it”

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AlexinNotTurkey
AlexinNotTurkey
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"bırakmak zorundaydın"

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/el_kousy

What is the difference between the two sentences

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jdonk
jdonk
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Can this mean 'you had to stop that'?

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Vijaya242162

Since 'onu' can mean he, she or it, why is "you should have stopped him" wrong?

1 month ago