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"O, şarabı içer."

Translation:He drinks the wine.

3 years ago

32 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/jsmitten
jsmitten
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Why is there a comma?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Selcen_Ozturk
Selcen_Ozturk
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When we say "O şarabı içer" there is an ambiguity, "o" could mean that ("o şarap" - that wine) or the personal pronoun. Therefore we need a comma to indicate it is the personal pronoun.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mathcore
mathcore
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and this explains why "that wine" wasn't accepted. thanks! here's a lingot to show my appreciation.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/xemaa8
xemaa8
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When you speak, do you have to make an oral pause because of the comma?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Selcen_Ozturk
Selcen_Ozturk
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no, we never do it

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sky770696

Why is "she drinks the wine" not accepted. How do we know if "o, " is he or she?

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JamesTWils
JamesTWils
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We don't. There is no difference. Report it.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AnCatDubh
AnCatDubh
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Interesting. The Arabic word for ‘drink’ (or, more accurately, ‘[he] drank’, the base form of Arabic verbs) is ‘sharaba’. Similarly, the English word ‘beer’ comes from Latin ‘bebere’ (to drink). It’s funny how Turkish (spoken in a Muslim country, and alcohol is prohibited in Islam) associates drinking with wine like English does with beer (similarly to a bunch of other languages).

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Selcen_Ozturk
Selcen_Ozturk
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just another small correction, Turkey is a secular country with a Muslim majority and people can drink wine as much as they want.

In old Turkish, "mey" [the Persian word for wine] was used more commonly instead of wine. I am curious whether a Turkic word exists for wine.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AneurinEE
AneurinEEPlus
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Ok, I got really curious about your second question and so I went and looked it up. Basically, I think there probably isn't a Turkic word (at least not an old one - I'm sure the language commission dreamt up something in the 1930s).

According to Nişanyan Sözlük, the Arabic noun šarāb initially just means a drink (not necessarily an alcoholic one), and then there's another form, šarrāb, which means "heavy drinker, drunkard" and is first attested in the 11th century. When the word first comes into Turkish in the 12th-13th century, it is as şarāb and equates in meaning (and spelling) to the Arabic šarāb ("su, her çeşit içecek"). Turkish is pretty accurate in transliterating Arabic, so if it had meant "alcoholic drink" from the start I think we would have seen şarrāb. I would therefore guess that the association of şarap* specifically with wine is probably a much later one.

In any case, they did not need another word for wine at this point, since they already had mey, which as you note means "wine and/or a fermented beverage" in both Persian and Turkish and comes into Turkish at the same time as şarāb (the 12th-13th century). The only other Turkish word for wine I can find is bade, which is also Persian and is first attested in the early 15th century. Given that medieval Turks borrow not one but two terms for wine from Persian, it seems likely that there wasn't a Turkic word for it (and, I suppose, why would there be one when Turks probably did not enounter wine-growing regions before the 11th century and did not consistently rule over the major wine-growing areas of the Levant and coastal Anatolia until the 13th-14th century?).

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Selcen_Ozturk
Selcen_Ozturk
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That's actually what I thought, probably there was no wine in central Asia.

more to arabic "ş-r-b", meşrubat also exists in Turkish (although being used less and less) which means any kind of drink (especially non-alcoholic)

There is also şurup, which is like English syrup, which I believe comes from the same Arabic root. And şerbet.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JamesTWils
JamesTWils
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According to Hungarian etymological dictionaries, the Hungarian word for wine, bor, derives from Old Turkic and the word can be found in Uyghur (the medieval language, I think, not the modern one), Kipchak, and Cuman, so there was a word for wine in older Turkic languages. Of course, wine was cultivated in the Caucasus, in Crimea, and I think for quite a long time in Iran, and there was a brisk trade in it throughout Central Asia, so I would have been surprised if they did not have such a word.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sXJaimeXs

You are right

1 day ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DyedBison
DyedBison
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A little off-topic, but I got curious: it appears Persian "mey" and English "mead" have a common ancestor -- https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/Appendix:Proto-Indo-European/m%C3%A9d%CA%B0u

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AnCatDubh
AnCatDubh
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Would Erdogan and his voters agree? :Þ

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Selcen_Ozturk
Selcen_Ozturk
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everyone has to officially agree with the current constitution :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Gntu9
Gntu9
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of thug life veru hu veru hu veru huud at

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JoannaKilanska

The vast majority of Turks, including the most of observant Muslims, are more than happy to live in a secular state. They have seen what happened to Iran, Iraq and Syria when religious preachers got too much influence and power.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ahnaqsh
Ahnaqsh
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Yes, interesting. :)

A small note, though: The word "sharab" means "a drink" in Arabic. The Arabic word for "he drank" is "shariba"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AnCatDubh
AnCatDubh
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Right! My Arabic is rusty... I majored in it in high school (I’m from Israel), but that was years ago...

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Hsn626796
Hsn626796
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The common term to indicate an alcoholic beverage in arabic is "mashrūb". However, "sharāb" usually refers to any regular liquid you might drink.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/andjre

I answered "They drink the wine"....why is it wrong?? O means he/she/it/THAT?? Içer refers to he/she/it drinks and they drink?? I m confused now with O!! I though that=şu ?? and O=he/she/it

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ChiBegam

he/she/it=O

BUT

They=Onlar

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JamesTWils
JamesTWils
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The comma is used to specify that it must be he/she/it here.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JaMaTaBa

Just a small question, how do you know whether it is a he or a she? Is it indicated by the comma or can it be referred to as anything.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Selcen_Ozturk
Selcen_Ozturk
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you don't, Turkish has no grammatical gender.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Gntu9
Gntu9
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kanser etti beni ne the sı ya

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/myriam853975

Why ekmek is written ekmeği not ekmeki?

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ahmed685708

(The) doesn't come with food!!! Why there is (the) everywhere!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JamesTWils
JamesTWils
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Yes, in English, we use "the" when referring to a particular dish. Thus, I might very well say "Please pass the wine," meaning the specific bottle of wine we have at the table, though I would say "Will you buy wine for dinner," not specifying a particular wine. This is true of every other food as well, e.g. "Do you like the rice?" "My wife baked the chicken, but I poached the fish," etc. Apparently, this definite sense is achieved in Turkish, only for the object of a verb, with this definite object ending.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/_zuzu_fit

Why is there a comma after the 'he'?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/obado
obadoPlus
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Read the first 2 posts

2 years ago