"Het meisje, wiens tas ik ook heb, spreekt heel langzaam."

Translation:The girl, whose bag I also have, speaks very slowly.

3 years ago

27 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Delamont
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Technically speaking, using 'wiens' (masculine & neutral) with 'het meisje' (neutral in linguistic gender though feminine in natural gender) would be considered wrong. Use 'wier' instead. A handy tool to remind yourself of the difference (but even natives are blatantly ignorant about this): 'wiens' is a portmanteau of 'wie zijns' (therefore masculine & neutral) and 'wier' a portmanteau of either 'wie haar' (feminine) or 'wie hunner' (plural).

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/_Odin_
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If you would use wier you would get weird looks since nobody uses that anymore. Technically you're right but it's advisable to not use wier and instead use wiens.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Delamont
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Even so, Odin and Torsby, I would still consider it wrong if I read this mistake, however colloquially common nowadays, in say poetry, a formal letter or an academic piece. I think this exemplifies one of those points where you can tell the difference between being fluent in a language and actually mastering a language (which is another thing entirely).

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tbs_
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Mastering a language means digging up archaic grammar laws that nobody cares about?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hagemeijerhans

No, just "van wie"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Torsby

Except that the difference between wiens and wier is never made anymore. Sadly enough :/

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PaulineStinson
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Not true at all. Although "wier" is virtually extinct, many (hopefully most) Dutch people will never use "wiens" for females, but always "van wie". By the way, "wiens" is pretty old-fashioned as well. "Van wie" is grammatically correct and can be used in all circumstances.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Deningrad

Must langzaam be translated into "Slowly" or can this sentence afford to use "Slow" instead?.... oh English... :(

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AStudyInRose
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I find that colloquially people often say things like "She speaks very slow," but technically this isn't correct because adverbs (ie. slowly) must describe verbs (ie. speaks). That's the general rule. This sometimes sucks when you realise that the adverb of "fast" is, indeed, "fast" though :P This obviously isn't the translation of the above sentence, but one could say that "her speech is slow" because "speech" is a noun. Hope this is what you were looking for, and good luck :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jskovgard1

I have the same question.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JoWillison

English speakers know what you mean if you forget to add the "-ly". And Americans drop it all the time!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Klgregonis
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Can tas also mean purse ( in the sense of handbag?)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/El2theK
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Handbag = handtas, I suppose it could refer to a handbag but then it could also refer to any other type of bag.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sanne393364

Yes

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Hamborg

could 'van wie' be used directly as the same meaning (and place in the sentence) as 'wiens'/'wier' here? Or is this 'wiens' because it refers to an ownership to the follwing?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hagemeijerhans

yes, on the same place in the sentence

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/El2theK
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But the sentence would change to: van wie ik de tas ook heb. Hence, while van wie is in the same place in the sentence it requires a bit more explanation than that.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Torsby

Refereert wiens niet echt specifiek naar die ene tas die dat meisje zelf heeft en is het daarom niet per definitie uitgesloten dat de ik-persoon die tas ook heeft? 'Het meisje, als wie ik de zelfde tas heb... " klinkt op de een of andere manier natuurlijker voor mij...

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hagemeijerhans

No, "wiens" tells us only to whom that bag belongs

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dctiel
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doesn't 'tas' also mean 'purse'

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Capisco_
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I'm pretty sure it does

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/El2theK
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It does not mean tas, it rather refers to a specific type namely a handtas, at least in US English:

  • Br English - purse = portemonee
  • US English - purse = handtas
3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RedaNoaimy1

I DON'T GET IT

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hagemeijerhans

Reda: the sentence is a bit "odd" "het meisje van wie ik de tas OOK heb" The question could be, what do we have more besides that bag, but forget WIENS and WIER {when it changed in 1932 I was too young to be interested)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jaco24977
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It could have been a customs official who has her passport as well...

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jaco24977
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Can a tas not also refer to a suitcase?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Petergies
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No suitcase is 'koffer'.

1 year ago
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