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  5. "Rica ederim!"

"Rica ederim!"

Translation:You are welcome!

March 24, 2015

55 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ARWATS

if Rica literally means "I beg you (to do)", then it is like the Arabic word "رجاء".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Aeminer3

ارجوكم is very formal in Arabic in my experience. So is rica ederim also very formal?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Aeminer3

Sorry about that. Question is -- is rica ederim used normally or only formally


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ARWATS

I think Rica ederim is formal


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/leilaattar2

There is not any option by the meaning of welcom


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MrHilmiNevzat

"Rica ederim!" Translation: You are welcome!

"Rica ederim", I am familiar with this term as my mother used to plead, beg my father not to hit me as a child when he was drunk. Sorry for the sad memories. I remembered it as a different meaning to Duo's. I do understand & like Duo's meaning.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JulieMorri9

I'm sorry to hear that.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jabramsohn

What does "rica" mean?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/orde90

it means 'very kind request'. You kindly request that he/she not even mention that.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/A1fie

"Rica ederim" literally means "I beg you (to do)". It is similar to French.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/skyline502

It's like "Prego!" (in Italian).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Danmoller

Is this an "answer to thank you" or a " you can come in"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlexinNotTurkey

it is an answer to "thank you." "You can come in" is almost always just "welcome" :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lallamaflamenca

Tebrik ederim = congratulations (lit. "I congratulate you") Teşekkur ederim = thank you (lit. "I thank you") Rica ederim = you're welcome (lit. "I ??? you")


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RyanGodley

I request. A little like "don't mention it" in English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kianoosh830737

It means : I beg you , I request you ...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kianoosh830737

I think it is parallel to Iranian expression : خواهش میکنم.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/WWIND07

its more close to the phrase تمنا دارم in formal Persian


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/linaaraki

Doesn't rica ederim also mean "please"? Example: Rica ederim gürültü etmeyin.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/A1fie

@lina: Yes it is used like that as well, but it's less common and slightly old-fashioned.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnkitM3

the correct translation for "please" would be "lütfen"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KhirouTaichi

Just like the German "Bitte"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnkitM3

For "Tessekur ederim" we also used "Tessekurler", do we have a similar alternative for Rica ederim too?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/A1fie

Yes, a few. The most common and more casual one is "Bir şey değil" or shortly "Bi'şey değil" which literally means "It is nothing."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/A1fie

The other options like "Ayıpsın" or "Ne demek" are too "street" and not necessary to learn at this level.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnkitM3

Thanks A1fie! That's a good alternative too. Also I happened to find another one word alternative to this: "Estağfurullah"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Selcen_Ozturk

actually it is not very normal to say "Estağfurullah" as a response to thank you. It is rather used when someone tells something good about you, or something bad about themselves.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/A1fie

Good one. However estağfurullah's main usage is to express humbleness.

-You are very clever!

-Estağfurullah (God forgive me [for vanity])

"Bi'şey değil" (it's nothing) is safer to use in any situation when someone says "thank you".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/milad62252

Estağfurullah is completely arabic ( استغفرالله) means " god bless " .


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Eyad133817

It is an arabic word, which is god forgive me


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Wengusflengus

Why does "rica" not respect vowel harmony? why is it not "rıca"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlexinNotTurkey

It is a loan word from Arabic. :) Many loanwords do not follow this pattern.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Wengusflengus

Are there any turks who hypercorrect and voluntarily mispronounce words to make them respect vowel harmony?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/luecke.carl

In English conversations, I often heard "not a problem" in this context. Is it correct as well? It has not been accepted (only "No problem" is). I suppose, that's a question about English rather than Turkish though.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ChiBegam

"Bir şey değil" is almost the same, as what you are mentioning...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Todd940413
  • I think it's safe to say that, in English, "You're welcome" is still the standard response to "Thank you." Yes, you might hear a variety of other responses, including (in descending order of formality, according to me, at least) "Don't mention it, "Any time," and "Not a problem." As with any language we're still learning, I think it's a good idea to go with the more standard and/or formal options when in doubt.
  • I'll also put in a plug here for contractions (e.g., "You're welcome" rather than "You are welcome"). They are extremely common in spoken English. In fact, it is quite rare for anyone to say "You are welcome." You might hear this from (i) someone who's taking extra time to enunciate this response with particular clarity, (ii) an English language learner, or (iii) a badly programmed robot. Accordingly, I hereby encourage Duolingo's content developers to consider including more contractions in the English content!

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NaairaU

I am confused on the pronunciation of "rica". The voice in the app says it too fast... Can someone please help me out?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Eyad133817

Rija as in g or j in jam


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/aguid

yeah my turkish grandfather says that this is a formal way of requesting something from someone rather than saying that "you are welcome." more along the lines of "would you please get me..."

he said it doesn't make sense to say this as "you're welcome"

can someone clarify?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SecretNumber

Is there more phrase to say you're welcome than Rica Ederim? Teşekkürler


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Todd940413

Evet. If you enter "You're welcome" on the English side of https://translate.google.com, the Turkish side will show a number of "matches," including "Bir şey değil!"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Truthxsaber

I wrote: I welcome you. Doesn't that mean the same thing as you're welcome?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/multilingt

I welcome you is like a greeting, like "I welcome you here" Whereas the intent here is to be graceful and accept an expression of gratitude or thanks.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sandervand6

Why is it written as rica, and pronounced as riça? I read it as 'rika' but that's clearly wrong.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Selcen_Ozturk

it is not pronounced as rika or riça. c in Turkish is always pronounced as g in general or j in jam.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zack244808

Why is "Your Welcome" wrong?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MrHilmiNevzat

"Rica ederim!" Translation: You are welcome!

Why is "Your Welcome" wrong?

Your is the second person possessive adjective, used to describe something as belonging to you. Your is always followed by a noun or gerund - a (verb) form acting as a noun.

"You are" & "you're" are correct words to use. Please try both as Duo may not accept the contracted version - (yet)

Very sorry Zack

Kind regards


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Anastasia_LL

OMG the languages finally messed up in my head and I was sure "Rica ederim" meant "I eat rice" ))


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MrHilmiNevzat

Anastasia773993

Hello

I eat rice - Pirinç yerim.

Nominative - pirinç

Definite accusative - pirinci

ç --> c Hard consonant to soft consonant for accusative case suffix "-i."

Pirinci yerim - I eat the rice.

Rica ederim! - You're welcome!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/marcosmacedo26

Thanks for mentioning this hard/soft consonant. I'm getting a bit confused about pronunciation, but now I know there's something else to learn.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Maryam393284

What does ederim mean?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MrHilmiNevzat

Maryam393284

Hello.

What does ederim mean? - "I am doing."

Derived from the (verb) - "etmek" meaning: "to do."

"You are" welcome.

Thank you.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Todd940413

Hi, Mango. It's an inflection of the verb etmek ; the full conjugation:
https://www.verbix.com/webverbix/go.php?D1=31&H1=131&T1=etmek
Here's another tool that can show the conjugations of many verbs: https://pharesdiego.github.io/konjush/ (thanks to Mariane for the tip!)

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