"Çay"

Translation:Tea

March 24, 2015

72 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/avalynnevvu

omg sounds like the chinese word for tea #coincidence i think not


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bbaggins8286

Also Russian and Hindi, all from Le Chinois ;)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/avalynnevvu

Romance languages be like "nooope not influenced by you muhahaahha" XDD


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnUnicorn

Although I have heard that some Brits refer to tea as "cha", and it's now a thing in America due to chai lattes at Starbucks...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Strapster

more often char than cha in Britain, I'd say, and quite old fashioned


[deactivated user]

    Except Portuguese which has chá :)


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JonEnMiljon

    And Romanian "ceai" (pronounced like chai)


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/epingchris

    Romance languages are influenced by the Min languages via thevsea route instead xD


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/water_color

    No-no, in Romanian it is "ceai" and sounds the same


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nicxjo

    Also like Persian! I love to see Persian words in Turkish, I already know them :)


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SunFlyingKite

    it is a Chinese word, not a Persian one.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Grokford

    Pretty much every word for tea comes from on of two Chinese words, Chai and Ta if I'm not mistaken


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlexinNotTurkey

    And then there is Polish ;) The word for it in Polish is "herbata"


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jozho

    Indeed, Polish and Belarusian are the only two slavic languages, in which tea is herbata, resp. гарбата. In all the others, this includes Bulgarian, Czech, Macedonian, Russian, Serbian/Croatian, Slovak, Slovenian, Ukrainian it is always чай, čaj, чаj or similar spelling, all based on the same "chai" pronunciation. To the large extent, afaik, the term is used both for tea and for herbal infusion.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chrigugegl

    Is that for tea or infusion (herbal tea)?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Isharaa

    Polish 'herbata' comes from Latin 'herba thea' so it's actually also comes from Ta ;) It means both the specific herb and infusion from different herbs and dried fruits. In the second case you often specify which herb/fruit ('herbata owocowa, malinowa, miętowa'). Also when you're talking about infusion from herb you can omit 'herbata' and just say the herb name ('mięta' - mint or infusion from mint).


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sal213540

    Lol in lithuanian it's "arbata"


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Andrew-Lin

    The words "tea" in many languages mainly come from two branches of Chinese language, one is "cha," which is used in Mandarin; and the other one is "tê," which is used in Minnan (Sothern-Min) language nowadays. I live in Taiwan and I speak both these language. For example, Turkish "çay," Russian "чай," japanese "(o)chya" are borrowed from "cha", while English "tea," French "thé" and German "Tee" are borrowed from "tê." Feel free to correct me if I am wrong :)


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Akash_Polyglot

    You forget to mention about India

    In India its too "chay"


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Joe264823

    I heard that too. Though I thought it was from Cantonese.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tareksaffa7

    In Arabic it's Shai instead of Chai !! they came from the same origin


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tomzn2

    In Arabic there is no letter or sound for what in Turkish is "ç" (in English mostly written as "ch") That's why Persian, Ottoman Turkish and other languages, that took over the Arabic alphabet, added the letter "چ", on the other hand in words with the the sound "ç" from other languages that entered into Arabic, the sound (and letter) is replaced by ش. E.g. in the case of شاي, which probably came via the Persian چای.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MarkNeberg

    That's what I thought.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Waqas.Shah

    It's in Urdu too, in Pakistan.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Berto29441

    ...and Japanese too


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Robert440119

    most important word in turkey


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnUnicorn

    Surely that would be kahve. :P


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlexinNotTurkey

    Turks definitely drink much more tea than coffee :D


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dieprinzessin

    Shouldn't the pronunciation include some 'i' sound in the end like 'tchai' ? Here I only hear 'tcha'


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/onurgur1

    The 'y' sound in the audio is omitted for some reason. So your pronunciation 'chai' is the correct one.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Joe264823

    True all Turkish people I know always say Chai, so I came here wondering. Thx for the post


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AngelSh1

    Iraqi people and Khaliji people say Chai


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ruqaya16

    Yeah that's right


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IrodaRustamova

    I'm uzbek and we say "choy". There isn't too much difference between Uzbek and Turkish language. So it's easy to me learn Turkish .


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Akash_Polyglot

    Thankyou can you tell me another basic differnce between turkiah and Uzbek in terms of language ?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SunFlyingKite

    Turkish and Uzbek are very closely related. As are Azeri and Turkmen and Kazakh. No doubt they all came from the same ancestor language. Look up Turkic languages. A fluent turkic speaker can easily learn all the other Turkic languages. They are all basically dialects of each other.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JuanRodrig736919

    Uzbek? Where is that spoken?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AkramShayzadag

    Sounds like urdu and hindi for tea


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Berto29441

    I read: "TEA:1650s, tay, also in early spellings thea, tey, tee and at first pronounced so as to rhyme with obey; the modern pronunciation predominates from mid-18c. But earlier in English as chaa (1590s), also cha, tcha, chia, cia. The two forms of the word reflect two paths of transmission: chaa is from Portuguese cha, attested in Portuguese from 1550s, via Macao, from Mandarin (Chinese) ch'a. The later form, which became Modern English tea, is via Dutch, from Malay teh and directly from Chinese (Amoy dialect) t'e, which corresponds to Mandarin ch'a. "


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/amarahdoc

    In Urdu, tea is also called "chai"


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ruqaya16

    Is there lessons to learn the turkeish letters ?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlexinNotTurkey

    Nope, we kind of expect it to come naturally for those who already speak English. If you go to the Top Posts in the Forum, you can find a pronunciation guide, or you could click Here


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/legendarynarwhal

    I've been using the Wikipedia page on the Turkish alphabet to aid in pronunciation ("c" and "ğ" trip me up a lot.)


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/anghely777

    My turkish club is NSJVWR


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ibra531117

    جاي او شاي in arabic language


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IsynaIzzal

    In Indonesian it's called Teh


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/samisdiri5

    Like شاي (shay) in arabic!


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lucaszchu

    Tea means it was introduced from the sea, the maritime silk road, while cha means it was introduced from the land, the regular silk road. It is interesting that the Poles use herbata, if they use cza, it would sound exactly the same as Mandarin, Polish cz is the same as Mandarin ch.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SunFlyingKite

    The ancient Silk Road ran through the heart of the Turkish (Turkic) regions in Central Asia. Thus the chinese derived word çay would have been in common use very early on in Turkish. Probably long before the Turks entered Anatolia and present day Turkey.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Aljanahser

    Also in arabic its شاي chay


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tati790359

    In catalan xai (sounds çay) is lamb


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mary91317

    Listening for me not working ! Plz help


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Amna50468

    it's sounds like punjabi


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RaviRamesh10

    The truth is the whole world uses only two variants of the word tea - one is tea/tee and chai/cha. The influence of colonialism really was the reason behind it.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FoghornJLeghorn

    So is çay from the sourh Asian chai and if so did the Turkish get it from the Mughal empire or Hindustan.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlexinNotTurkey

    I believe this word ultimately entered all of these languages from Chinese actually :)


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnUnicorn

    Yep! Typically, if the country was exposed to it by overland trade from northern China, or from the Portuguese conquest of Macau, the language ended up with a word derived from Cantonese chà (cf. Turkish çay, Russian чай, Arabic شاي (shay), Japanese おちゃ ocha, and Hindi चाय ‎(chaay) which shows up in English as "chai (masala)", a variety of black tea with a blend of spices, and British slang "char," both borrowings from Colonial India.)

    If they got it from the Min Chinese who lived on the southern China coast and did a lot of sea trade, or from the Dutch who traded with the Min, they ended up something derived from Min (cf. English "tea", Dutch thee, French thé, German Tee.)

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tea#Etymology


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HeidiAlexa8

    You shouldn't link anything

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