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"Usted me muestra su coche."

Translation:You show me your car.

5 years ago

30 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Naypam
Naypam
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I don't think I'd have gotten this one unless it'd turned up 100 times doing one of the other lessons that I find particularly difficult!

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mitcorb

Don't feel lonely. This is a section in the program that is more difficult for me to grasp. Take a moment to read the Tips. The rules of usage are available to read there.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/seanb276

Agreed, it is by far the hardest so far.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MartinCo

Duolingo often translates the simple present of Spanish into the simple present of English. There is some overlap in the meaning, but it is a little odd. English uses the simple present to talk about habitual actions. I EAT eggs for breakfast [everyday]. Spanish can do that, too. But to talk about a current action, English uses the present progressive form. You are showing me your car. This is another use of the simple present tense in Spanish.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/enoksrd

esta parte me fue dificíl :D

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mattmoran

Is this a command or a statement?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
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I think for the imperative 3rd person singular, would need MUESTRE. Que is added often, according to my text. So I think it's "!Que me muestre su coche!" Like something law enforcement may say?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/droma
droma
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it is a statement.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/amagsino

what is the root verb for muestra? is it muestrar? (and what is the meaning?)

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/enoksrd

Here is a mnemonic for the meaning: "muestrar" sounds similar to "demonstrate" in English.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/twinsocks
twinsocks
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mostrar, not "muestrar". It's like dormir and duerme

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Naypam
Naypam
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"Mostrar".

"Muestra" is the irregular 3rd person singular.

It means "to show".

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
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MOSTRAR to show, to point out, to display: Present indicative-- muestro, muestras, muestra, mostramos, muestran

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pcunix

In English, if I just wanted to see your car, I'd say "Show me your car", not "You show me your car" as this says. I might say something like "You show me your car and I'll tell you what it is worth", but even then I'd probably leave off the implied "you" most of the time.

So why does it mark "Show me your car" as wrong? Excessively literal again?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/twinsocks
twinsocks
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Not at all, you are thinking of the command "Show me your car", but you have not learnt how to make commands yet. The translation of this is "You show me your car" as a statement, not a command. It's like "I call you up, you buy me dinner, you show me your car, I am quite impressed, I walk over to you, we exchange Pokémon cards"...

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/telemetry
telemetry
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I think 'show me your car' would really be an imperative (a command), which would be 'usted me muestre su coche' I think? Since this is 'muestrA' it's the usual 'he/she/usted does a thing' form.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/percyflage

you show me your car...y yo te muestro el mio! Hmm? Is that anywhere near correct?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
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Yes, excessively literal. I don't think they had a native English speaker Beta test the entire program. Regardless, as a beginner I find it useful because of the audio portion alone. I am trying to develop my Spanish ear, so when I hear "ella" I immediately feel/see/think "SHE" instead of thinking somone is about to get sick.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pcunix

It makes me wonder about the accuracy of the Spanish here also. I mean in general, not specifically this phrase. Unfortunately, I have no way to check: you can't trust Google translate and asking someone who speaks Spanish depends upon how well they know Spanish or how well they understand English!

I suppose it really doesn't matter. My daughter (who majored in Spanish) says that, unlike the French, Spanish speakers usually are delighted that you have made any effort at all and will cheerfully accept your errors..

I do run things by her, but I hate bothering her. Last week she visited and we spent an hour together while I did Duolingo - that was really wonderful, but it was a rare opportunity!

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rajtik

And how would be than "You show me his car."? Shouldn't that be also correct answer?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bluemarimba

Based on native speakers' comments elsewhere, in that case, since the assumption would be ''your'', they would clarify by saying "Usted me muestra el coche de él''.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SD-77
SD-77
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Now you are a car dealer.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/melike.iscan

I really didn't get it. It is "El le lee un libro a ella" but not "Usted me muestra su coche a yo". Why not? It says "le" is necessary for the first sentence because it emphasizes that "ella" is the one to whom he reads. But here again "yo" is the one "usted" shows his/her car. I am not sure if i clarified my question, this topic is too damn difficult!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/telemetry
telemetry
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You need to say a mí, not a yo. Yo is a subject pronoun, which you use when you're the subject of the sentence. In this case you're an object, because someone else is showing the car to you. It's like the difference between I and me in English - you wouldn't say 'you show the car to I', you need to use the object form instead.

There's more here if you like http://www.studyspanish.com/lessons/oppro.htm

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/melike.iscan

Ah! I totally forgot that "ella" has the same form at subject & object pronoun. Thank you.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tbarasmussen

No. On English you use 2 cases: Nominative and Accusative. Nominative is used for subject, and Accusative is used for object, indirect object or after a preposition. On Spanish you use Dative for indirect object (not acc.), and you use Prepositional after a preposition.

ella (nom), la (acc), le (dat), ella (pre) = she (nom), her (acc), her (acc), her (acc)

Hope you understand

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/attis765
attis765
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So basically "para me" equals "me"? Because in the earlier lessons this sentence would have been like this: "Usted muestra su coche para me". Does it mean the very same thing? Anyone?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/telemetry
telemetry
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Para has a lot of meanings, often it means 'for' but there are other situations. This video is pretty good:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_cBJoq479NM

But if you want to say "for me" it would be para mí:
http://www.studyspanish.com/lessons/oppro.htm

It's worth going over that site, especially covering the pronoun stuff. What might be confusing you here is the translation of this sentence - as far as I can tell (someone correct me if I'm wrong) the me in this sentence is an indirect object pronoun.
The literal translation is "you (subject pronoun) show your car (direct object pronoun) to me (indirect object pronoun)". The translation is fairly informal so it's dropping that implied to that you get with an indirect object, that might be what's throwing you off.
http://www.studyspanish.com/lessons/iopro1.htm

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/attis765
attis765
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I think it's time to look for a grammar book. I'm not fond of it, but I need some guidance and explanations.

4 years ago