"Siete proprio fortunati."

Translation:You are really lucky.

September 2, 2013

28 Comments
This discussion is locked.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/queenzatana

How do I know when "proprio" means 'just', 'truly', or 'quite'? It's very confusing..


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Viaggiatore

It means all those things and more. http://www.wordreference.com/iten/proprio Are you losing hearts for choosing the wrong one?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/queenzatana

Yeah, it keeps happening =T For this particular question, I put, "You are just lucky," but in hindsight, I suppose that was kind of a dumb answer, haha.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/t_s_c

@queen, are you saying this cannot be "you are just lucky"? I looked at viaggatore's link, but still don't get the difference.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jjjmindless

"you are just lucky" still doesn't work


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ab987

I put 'you really are lucky' and it was wrong. How would you say my sentence in Italian?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HaroldWonh

It's a perfect translation into English - and probably more natural than the one DL insist on.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bev78710

'You are all really lucky' not accepted when in previous exercises the formal/plural 'you' of the verb essere has been translated by DL as 'you all'. You just can't win!!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KatrinaKett

siete davvero fortunati - another option, no?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/K2mission

I'd like to know as well. Is there a difference between using either davvero or proprio?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JoshuaKnic

I think that would be more like "you (all) are truly lucky/fortunate," but that still seems like a perfectly acceptable translation to me.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IOK-1

I translated "Siete proprio fortunati" as "You really are lucky". This was rejected even though I think this really is acceptable English. My Italian/English dictionary tells me that "proprio" only means "really" when used as an adverb, not as an adjective. Is my dictionary wrong? Reported 2019-01-06


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Midtoad

In this situation could I use davvero?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mangoHero1

Yes, you could


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SteveKillick

What is wrong with you are all really lucky when siete is being used and lucky is in the plural?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mico_di_Ostia

fortunati = fortunate (among other synonyms)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CjRM2u

Can "proprio" be replaced with 'veramente'?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mangoHero1

Yep, that's basically what proprio means in this case.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MaryBethCoates

Common DL, it's natural to say "Youreally are lucky". - please accept


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MichaelASm314026

when do you use "siete" rather than "sei" for "you are"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JoshuaKnic

Sei - you (singular) are

Siete - you (plural) are


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MichaelASm314026

Grazie! I should have realized that "fortunati" implies plural.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/m_cos

Can't I translate this as "you're so fortunate?" Or is that too colloquial?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DavideSp60

Anche voi siete va bene!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EricHarris778606

And "you are all really fortunate" doesn't work


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ingeborg483858

Why only" lucky" not" happy"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ernestohor11

You are so lucky


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chris928950

My long dead grandmother would say 'you're proper lucky'. I now see that maybe that North English dialect is actually based on Latin too.

Learn Italian in just 5 minutes a day. For free.