"Let's drink more water."

Translation:Bebamos más agua.

3 years ago

82 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/ayoung101
ayoung101
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what's the difference between bebamos and bebemos? this entire section doesn't explain anything and is very difficult to understand.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jfGor
jfGor
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The difference is that bebamos is in the imperative mood (command) in this sentence. It's a nosotros command where the speaker is also in the command (let's or let us). The imperative is conjugated just like the subjunctive mood, present tense except the affirmative 'tú'.

http://www.studyspanish.com/lessons/noscomm.htm

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mamewolfe
mamewolfe
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and the negative "tu"?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kirakrakra

mamewolf it is like jGor says

no bebas, no beba, no bebamos, no bebáis, no beban

IMPERATIVE = PRESENT SUBJUNCTIVE except for affirmative II person commands: bebe (sing), bebed (pl)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JadeSteffe1

"Bebamos" is the subjunctive or imperative (command) nosotros form of beber. I believe in this sentence, it would be the imperative form.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jfGor
jfGor
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Yes it is the imperative mood and it is the gentle command where the speaker is included. 'Let's', and yes it is conjugated the same as the Subjunctive, present tense.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JodieLock

I think it is along the lines of we are drinking/we drink bebemos and we could drink future maybe bebamos

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ELTA651133
ELTA651133
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Bebemos= we drink ( present simple) Bebamos = let's drink (present, but we are going to do it in a few second )

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
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All Spanish present tenses can be used to express what is going to happen in the immediate future. The difference between bebemos and bebamos is the mood. There are three moods. Indicative, imperative and subjunctive. Bebemos is indicative mood. That is the most common mood. In talks about things that are true or real, or we believe them to be so. Babamos in this case is in the imperative mood. A sentence which begins let's in English is in the imperative mood. Remember that the imperative mood is not only used for what we recognize as a command, but also for simple invitations or suggestions like Have a drink/Let's have a drink or Sit down/Let's sit down. There is an exception to this with the phrasal future. The nosotros phrasal future is also translated as Let's. The verb ir does not change to the imperative form in this case. Bebamos can also be subjunctive since most verbs use the subjunctive form for all imperatives except the affirmative tú commands, although there are a few irregular imperatives. You can recognize the subjunctive in regular verbs because it makes AR verbs look like ER verbs and ER and IR verbs look like AR verbs because of the swapping of vowel in the ending. Of course the yo subjunctive form is like the third person form in the subjunctive. But if you remember the infinitive is beber you will always recognize bebemos as indicative and bebamos as subjunctive, just like hablamos is indicative and hablemos is subjunctive for the verb hablar.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rgonnering

"Bebemos más agua" is "we drink more water" and is present indicative. "Bebamos más agua" is "let's drink more water" and is imperative. It might also be "we might drink more water" which is present subjunctive. The imperative conjugation and present subjunctive are the same and the meanings are very similar.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
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Might is not a good translation for the subjunctive. Where you see might in English you will see some form of poder, most commonly podía because might is more conditional than subjunctive. The bottom line is this simple sentence is imperative. The imperative uses the subjunctive forms (mostly) because commands are just forceful requests. There is still some doubt (by Spanish standards) that the action will be taken. That's all the subjunctive can do, so there is no other subjunctive that it can be.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TiffanyEpiphany

What's wrong with vamanos a beber más agua?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jindr004
jindr004
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There is one thing wrong with it, and one weirdness.

What is wrong is that you framed it as a positive statement ("We will drink more water") rather than a suggestion/imperative (Let us drink more water).

The weirdness is that the usual verb for drink in this context is tomar not beber. Although beber is not exactly wrong, it is not how I would expect someone to phrase this statement.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
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It has been my impression that although beber means drink and tomar has more meanings, tomar is used most commonly for to drink. Is that true, or is it somehow situational? And just for reference, are you Spanish or Latin American?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jindr004
jindr004
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You are not wrong, but there is no perfect answer to this question because it is totally context driven. Maybe the best way to explain the difference is by doing what I am usually reluctant to do; let us make a comparison to English.

  • Beber is the verb that precisely describes the action; so in English it only means drink as in "They should drink water to avoid dehydration".
  • Tomar is a verb that indicates a "take/have" action; so in English this would best be understood as "Let's have some water".

So as in English the context defines the word choice. When speaking precisely or formally one would use beber, but among friends, especially when suggesting an action as in the lesson phrase and almost always when talking about drinking alcohol, you would use tomar. That was why I said that I would expect tomar here rather than beber.

Anyway, that is the usage in Mexico, Peru, El Salvador, and Spain northwest of Madrid and Andalusia.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alejandrocarmo

I thought "Vamos a beber más agua" but Duo. told wrong.

I'm Spanish and we can say it like this, but also we can say "tomar".

But in this instance perhaps is better the imperative "bebamos".

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Yleexot406

In Venezuela, I learned that "Vamos a" meant "let's". "Vamos a ver" = "Let's see", "Vamos a comer" = "Let's eat"., etc.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
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Vamos a beber/tomar is certainly a common way of saying Let's drink. But it isn't the only way to do so, and it doesn't illustrate the grammar feature that Duo is trying to teach here. Let's is the way we form the we imperative in English. The formal, "official" we imperative in Spanish uses the imperrative/subjunctive form of the root verb. The problem, for Duo's purposes, with the vamos a infinitive is two-fold. First ir is the ONLY verb that doesn't require the imperative in the nosotros form to be imperative. You will sometimes hear Vayamos, but not really in combination with other verbs. So, since Duo's sentences never have context, Vamos a beber/tomar is ambiguous. It could either be the informal imperative Let's drink or the standard phrasal future indicative we are going to drink. Duo liked to reserve it for the phrasal future. The second reason is that using only ir for either the we imperative or the phrasal future only provides practice for conjugating ir. Só you don't learn the conjugation of the future of other verbs or even the standard conjugation of the imperative due to the above mentioned exception. For some reason Duo seems to have occasionally strayed from its original practice of requiring the Spanish phrasal future in translation of the English phrasal future and the conjugated future in translation for the English formal future. They may also stray from this imperative distinction. But I actually would suggest to students who are trying to learn Spanish that they use these various clues to practice the various forms that are available, and will be sometimes used, in Spanish.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Yleexot406

Two points: 1> I'm doing Duo in order to improve my ability to communicate with others when I travel in a Spanish speaking country, so I'm not trying to be a grammarian (Estoy seguro de que yo conozco suficiente español para meterme en problemas. ¡La esperanza es aprender lo suficiente para salirme!) Spanish, like English, often has several ways to get the meaning across. 2> When I first started Duo a year or so ago, when you gave a translation (either from English to Spanish or from Spanish to English) Duo would give you an alternative translation, often the one they were hoping for that corresponded to the appropriate lesson. Too bad they quit doing that.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/elizadeux
elizadeux
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"Vamos a beber" is a correct translation for "Let's drink" and should be accepted. Reported April 2018.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ELTA651133
ELTA651133
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Actually you can say that and its correct, but the app its strict, vamonos, is used for the verb let's go And vamos its just for let's

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ELTA651133
ELTA651133
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Belive me, its the same Vamos a beber mas agua= bebamos mas agua Even its tge same =" vamonos a beber más agua"

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dansmisterdans

Everytime I hear "¡Vámonos!" I think of: (1) the bandits in The Treasure of the Sierra Madre and (2) my neighbour trying to get her family to get ready for church: ¡Levantaos, vámonos de aquí!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
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No. You have two different things being said there. Vamos a beber más agua is Let's drink more water. Babamos más aqua is indeed the same. But vámanos comes from the verb irse, which means to leave. So vámanos a beber más agua makes no sense.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kchang172

What's wrong with Vamos a tomar mas agua?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/wklem88

I would like to know also.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jfGor
jfGor
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I have seen that construction before, and I guess it means 'let's go drink more water. I am not sure that it is right either.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jeanniepq

Spanishdict.com gives 'vamos a beber mas agua' if you put in the original sentence in English.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jfGor
jfGor
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Yes I have learned that you are right. I'm no expert but if you look here http://www.wordreference.com/conj/ESverbs.aspx?v=ir and scroll down to the nosotros for the imperative and you will see that both vayamos and vamos can be used to mean 'let's go' for the affirmative. But I am assuming that one could you the nosotros imperative of the verb as well. Duo is teaching there are many ways to say the same thing. Your sentence also means 'let's go drink more more water, likely because ' We are going to drink more water' sounds harsh.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/riodelbanana

I think the sentence suggests the subjunctive mood, as in "I'd like us to drink more water", instead of "We are going to drink more water" which is more imperative.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jfGor
jfGor
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We are going to drink more water is phrasal future (Indicative mood). Imperative for nosotros is a command where the speaker is in the command (let's drink more water).

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jindr004
jindr004
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There is nothing wrong with it so long as you are trying to say "We are going to drink more water" as a factual statement of what will happen rather than proposing that your group drink more as a suggestion. The lesson phrase is a proposal.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rupanama
rupanama
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"Vamos a tomar mas agua." implies a future event that will happen, i.e. "We are going to drink more water." The subjunctive construction implies a suggestion, an event that may happen, or may not.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jfGor
jfGor
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It is the imperative mood not present subjunctive mood, although the conjugations are the same in this sentence. It is a gentle command for 'us'.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
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It is considered the nosotros imperative form. We have so many misconceptions about the imperative/command form based on always seeing exclamation points in discussions of the imperative but Let's is how you recognize the we imperative form in English and it is, as you say, basically a suggestion. But actually the most common uses of the imperative are suggestions or invitations (come in, sit down, have a drink, etx)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dansmisterdans

My old English teach called this the "hortatative" mood and would rattle off a string of war-time leader quotes to exemplify

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Santiago683730

Tomar is correct in mexican spanish, vamos a tomar más agua

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FieldsKaty

Vamos before the phrase does mean let's .... It is wrong to not give credit for this.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rob2042

"Vamos a beber más agua." should be accepted. Reported 9-9-2015.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Adam-Rabel

Agreed.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kelvin803946
Kelvin803946
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Vamos a beber mas agua still not accepted. 2/4/16

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/stevehaker

Same, 6/7/2016.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
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Vamos a beber más agua is not a correct translation for Let's drink more water. Your sentence is a simple declarative informal future statement. It is the translation for we are going to drink more water. At least in my experience, many English speakers think of the imperative only in the second person. In fact many don't recognize the.polite invitations and suggestions, like come in or help yourself as imperative. I don't know about third person imperative forms, but we do have have a first person plural imperative form. It is Let's. So let's translates to the first person plural imperative of the verb in Spanish, which is the same as the first person plural.subjunctive.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/stevehaker

I thought it was a strange translation too, but I see it quite often on Spanish learning sites, including Duolingo:

https://www.duolingo.com/comment/401769

and other places where the translation is "let's go ...", for example "Vamos a nadar a mi casa" is translated as "Let us go swim at my house."

https://www.duolingo.com/comment/1100642 https://www.duolingo.com/comment/932055 https://www.duolingo.com/comment/260220

Honestly though, I only tried this construction because I couldn't remember the past imperfect, i.e. the whole point of the lesson.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
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I was going to mention vamos as we go. I am not quite sure how much had to do with English and how much with the Spanish, but vamos and vayamos are both generally translated Let's go. I think that is.partially because we would generally not say we go, or even we are going at the times that a Spanish speaker might say vamos. But vamos and vayamos are mostly exceptions.

But this lesson (or at least this sentence) is NOT in the past imperfect. The past imperfect (which is often just called the imperfect) form of beber is bebíamos. The answer listed above is bebamos which is the imperative or subjunctive. As I say, it is signalled by the Let's.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Deborah720662

Same 7/30/2017

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RubyTu2

I understand the difference, but what is WRONG with "tomamos" instead of bebamos? Tomar is much more commonly used, in my experience.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jehannabra

Why Bebamos? I can't even find in in my verb book?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
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Bebamos is the first person plural imperative of the verb beber. Except for affirmative tú commands, the imperative uses the subjunctive form. For some reason,.many English.speakers think of the.imperative only as barked.orders. Actually, most invitations are in the imperative. Come in, sit down, have a drink are all imperatives. Let's is how you phrase these invitations for the we form. It can be a little confusing, though, because we would really never say a sentence like "We go" in English, although they do in Spanish. So you may see both vamos and vayamos translated as Let's go.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Duazido
Duazido
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what is wrong with vamos a beber más agua?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ZaneHuttinga

Is it incorrect to use tener here? I thought tener was sometimes used for "to drink."

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SimoneBa
SimoneBa
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You probably mean "tomar", NOT "tener".

"Tomemos más agua" should work.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ZaneHuttinga

Oh, you're right. That's what I was thinking of.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/supercalidocious

I thought at some point I learned that one uses 'que' + 'subjunctive verb' for "let's. . . " Is "Que tomemos más agua" just a construction of my imagination??

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jfGor
jfGor
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Let's drink is a soft imperative, and it is not in the Subjunctive mood but it is conjugated like the present subjunctive, but it is in the Imperative mood.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tessbee

I got this one wrong and Duo gave the "correct" solution as "Hay que beber más agua." I don't know what "Hay que" means in this sentence.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
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I am curious what your wrong answer was, only because Duo will try to give correct answers that are closer to what they Think you were trying to say. Sometimes this goes way off course, but this seems reasonable, although I would not call it a direct translation. Hay que is a way to express that something is necessary. It is not generally a requirement of a person or institution but of life or circumstances. So in this case it would translate to something like we need to drink more water. The exercise, I believe, was trying to get at the imperative Let's which is basically the subjunctive, so that is the answer listed at the top of this comment page.

Here is a link discussing tener que and hay que, which are quite similar, but not the same. http://www.studyspanish.com/lessons/tenque.htm

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tessbee

Thank you for a very quick reply, Lynette! I've never seen "hay que" before now so I have no idea what to make of it. Thanks for the link!

Yes, I understand how Duo tries to give correct answers that are close to the wrong ones entered, so I did think they gave me "hay que" because I entered "vamos a" which is just a statement (and I was in the imperative/subjunctive lesson, ha!)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PELA225133
PELA225133
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Could the following sentence be correct? "dejanos beber mas agua"

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kirakrakra

PELA, NO! you transfer a suggestion to a permission

dejamos de beber/ we permit drinking

nos dejamos de beber/ we allow us to drink are permissions

Duo has bebamos/ let us drink, a suggestion

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MikeWise2

I've heard natives say, "Tenemos mas agua." Why not here?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
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Tenemos más agua means we have more water. I don't see that as a suggestion or prescription to drink more water unless the person speaking thought the "if you would like some" was assumed. At any rate it is a different sentence.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JoseRaulGu6

in spanis "tomar = beber"

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dprbreck

Still not fixed. Vamos a beber should be accepted. With the exception of some tut-tut from a non-native speaker, native speakers have affirmed that indeed it means 'Let's drink more water'.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/snoblitt

¿Porque "Bebamos" no es correcto?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Deborah720662

The correct answer that came up for this on Duolingo was "Hay que beber mas agua." How does this sentence indicate the "we" in the English sentence?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
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That is probably an answer that got accepted and can therefore always come up as correct. Always look at the suggested answer at the top of the discussion to find the answer they currently prefer. Hay que is somewhat hard to translate into English. Spanishdict uses one must for some circumstances.

http://www.spanishdict.com/translate/hay%20que

I have always been against accepting answers because they mean about the same thing. I think for those who have little exposure to Spanish outside of Duo they can be too confusing. But if someone in a work meeting said Hay que completar el proyecto, I would consider it a stronger, albeit indirect, nosotros or ustedes command. But it is off theme if they are teaching the imperative.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ira_T

I wrote: Vamos a beber mas agua. Is that wrong?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
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Strictly speaking yes, although in coloquial speech it would definitely work. But Let's is the indicator of the English equivalent to the nosotros imperative form, so when you see Let's you know that Duo wants the imperative. Literally speaking what you said is we are going to drink. But the verb ir is often used in its indicative Form as an imperative. It is unique in that. And native speakers will often use vamos a as an imperative colloquially. But in its goal of teaching the imperative Duo uses let's as the signal for the nosotros imperative.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Vibekebryggen

Why is bebemos wrong

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
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The English Let's is the equivalent of the we imperative. All imperatives except for the affirmative Tú form use the subjunctive which in this case is babamos.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LizStace

I used the right word but I spelled it incorrectly!

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
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Computers don't know the difference if your misspelled word didn't match the criteria for being a typo. Duo's error messaging only has about four messages to choose from anyway. Watch the accents, you missed a word, you used the wrong word, or something that essentially says you used the wrong conjugation, but that one is generally the most confusing because it also can mean the wrong mood or tense. So matching those four messages with all the types of errors people make, you generally end up confused. And the suggested answer can be any accepted answer, so may include non core vocabulary and such. But comparing your answer with the one shown in this discussion section generally will let you diagnose your own problem, at least enough to ask questions.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LizStace

I also gave the correct answer as my second response!!

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mariia320623

What the difference between "tomar" and "beber"? I thought that we "bebemos agua", but "tomamos alcohol/té/café"

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
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Actually this sentence is in the we imperative so it really should be either babamos más agua or tomemos más agua. The terminal vowels swap in the subjunctive imperative forms. Tomar is indeed a more common word for to drink in conversational Spanish.

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Deborah720662

Nearly everyone here is discussing the difference between "vamos" and "babemos" but the answer Duo gave me today uses neither. Today the right answer is "Hay que beber mas agua." Sigh.

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
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No one is discussing vamos here as that isn't appropriate. Most of the discussion is on beber and tomar and the imperative forms. Hay que is sort of like a passive voice we imperative {I just made that up, so don't bother googling it} Duo can always show any accepted answer as correct, so occasionally you will get one based on something not really taught on Duo. The problem is that it tends to make people make an assumption about their answer which may or may not correctly identify the issue.

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Deborah720662

Oops. I don't know how to edit the comment I just made. Actually the answer today is "Hay que TOMAR mas agua."

8 months ago
Learn Spanish in just 5 minutes a day. For free.

Learn Spanish in just 5 minutes a day. For free.