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  5. "Canım acıyor!"

"Canım acıyor!"

Translation:It hurts!

March 26, 2015

27 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/david.rolland

What is the difference between ağrıyor and acıyor?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlexinNotTurkey

ağrımak is for more consistent pain. acımak is for sharp, short pain. :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/david.rolland

Tamam, çok teşekkür ederim!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nestes

If I wanted to say 'It hurts, my dear' would it be "Canım canım acıyor"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Selcen_Ozturk

yes you can say that :) although I would rather place "dear canım" at the end; "canım acıyor, canım"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AneurinEE

How does the grammar work here?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlsEenPoffertje

I would like to know this as well. :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Selcen_Ozturk

you should learn it as a phrase, it means it hurts, i have a pain.

can is complicated to translate, we use it in many contexts, it is something like a soul. Although it is a Persian word, we use it even more extensively.

For example in this phrase we rather talk about physical pain. Literally we could say it is "my soul is hurting".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BobRadu

Yeah, I tried "my soul hurts" thinking it was poetic.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BenjaminHo5

Could you also say, "Canım ağrıyor" ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Selcen_Ozturk

no that's not possible


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/victordcn

How would you translate: 'my soul hurts'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hojinkie

Is it possible "acıyor" also means to burn in terms of a flesh wound as well as to feel sorry for?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlexinNotTurkey

Like if you touch a hot plate or something and it turns red? I am not sure if I understand your question


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hojinkie

Exactly like touching a hot pan or putting salt on a wound.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlexinNotTurkey

You can use it describe the pain from that, but you would normally use the verb "yakmak" to actually describe a physical burn. "a burning sensation" could be this though, although we may not include it to prevent confusion about the meaning

"I feel sorry" cannot be this. That would be "üzüldüm"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/UrfaliSueAnn

But aci also refers to sharp short pain as in the burning of hot peppers, right? Aci biberler


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlexinNotTurkey

Yep, it also means "bitter" :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/stargazza

How would you say; "I am aching"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mirage20

In Turkish there is a term "kırılıyorum" that literally translates as "I am breaking" and is used to describe the aching sensation often felt when one is sick. Otherwise, acıyor, sanciyor or ağrıyor would be used to describe aches and pains in various parts of the body. Eg. Dişim ağrıyor (I have a tooth ache) or Bileyimi kırdım, çok aciyor (I broke my wrist, it hurts a lot). I hope this helps answer your question.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/venatio

So this is the phrase I would use if I was ever "lucky" enough to get stung be a be, I guess? What would "I was stung by a bee/hornet." be in Turkish? :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SabineBergmann1

I think that ia stung from an insect is "sokma" - yılan sokması veya böcek sokması. I am not sure (learning myself), I think you could say "Yılan sokmasım aciyor".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KarinAngele

can also means heart, isn't it? so i'd translated it like "my heart aches". is that wrong?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/turkey1260

I translated similar to Karin Angele: my heart hurts. But it is wrong. WHY?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hannerfish

In Turkish, the figurative heart is more often yürek, not can. The literal heart is kalp. As Selcen said earlier, this is just a phrase we need to learn in Turkish. Some things can't be translated literally.

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