"Andeartháir."

Translation:The brother.

3 years ago

11 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Fingolfin1346

The etymology of this word may help people to remember it. Deartháir comes from Old Irish derbráthair, from derb (“certain”) + bráthair (“brother”). The derbfine ("certain kin") was a kin group of four generations.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JarodKerney

i've done this lesson dozens of times, and can't ever hear audio for this word, or for deirfiúr either, for that matter, and several others as well. i know what the words mean but it would be nice to be able to hear them spoken so i know i can get the right pronunciation. Anyone help?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/galaxyrocker

Not every word has audio. That's because they used a real (albeit awful) speaker. Here is deartháir in all three dialects and sadly deirfiúr isn't added there yet.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/anfeardathuil

Here's a forvo link for deirfiúr: http://www.forvo.com/word/deirfi%C3%BAr/#ga Bit more of a gamble dialect-wise because it's crowdsourced, but it's there.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/roh1990
roh1990
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Thank you!! It's impossible trying to learn these words without a pronunciation, and it's not like it's easy to work out with Irish.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/galaxyrocker

Actually, it is quite regular once you learn the rules. I suggest reading through this article to get familiar with Irish orthography rules.

Also, you don't generally want to trust the speaker here on Duolingo; she is quite incompetent.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/roh1990
roh1990
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I'm getting that impression!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CatMcCat
CatMcCat
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I think what I find frustrating about trying to figure out pronunciation from the way a word is spelled, is that "deirfiúr" really sounds like "druffer" or "dre-fooor" in all the versions on forvo. (The /r/ coming right after the /d/ and the vowels coming after.) "Deartháir" sounds the way I'd expect it to in the Ulster version on teanglann, but the other two dialects also sound like the /r/ comes right after the /d/. I do need to re-read the orthography rules (many times!) but I'm not convinced the pronunciation is all that easy to figure out. Anyway, this is probably minor compared to the wonkiness of English, but I like to try to sound them out first (in Irish, that is) and then check against a site like teanglann or forvo to see if I'm even close.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/galaxyrocker

It's likely because when the spelling was standardized they took out 'superfluous' letters that actually weren't 'superfluous'. driofúr is a non-standard spelling of it, however.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/grf1426
grf1426
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What about abair.ie ?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JarodKerney

Go raibh maith agat!

3 years ago
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