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  5. "Tu manges mon déjeuner !"

"Tu manges mon déjeuner !"

Translation:You are eating my lunch!

December 17, 2012

70 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pjmeach

HOW DARE YOU, YOU EAT MY LUNCH!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/juancamilog

Well, I didn't know! It was there, it looked delicious and I was hungry... Sorry!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/extremeblueness

EXTERMINATE! EXTERMINATE!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FuzzyPanda-SK

Would you like some butter on that?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Crimson_Aelch

Would you like butter or bread?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EmperorTheo

It's fine, I never liked Surströmming anyways.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/8yghuyfrbjhf

This is French, not Swedish, lol


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DuoLogue

I left some crumbs for you...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mac747116

Oh come on, it was only the dog.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mac747116

Calm down, it was only the dog. He was hungry.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/enwired

In English, "To eat someones lunch" can mean "to defeat someone" or "to get the better of someone". Does it have that idiomatic meaning in French?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zzyss

I came here to ask precisely this!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TheTastyWord

Huh, I didn't know that idiom, but it apparently exists: http://idioms.thefreedictionary.com/eat+lunch

Thanks, enwired, I learned something new (apart from Duo's lessons, that is) today. Merci bien ! :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/WillowTan

I've never known that this saying exists... that could be, however, if you don't think of the idiom it's good comic relief (so random). For some reason I doubt this because this is the Dates and time skill. It should be in the Idioms and proverbs bonus skill, so I bet it's just qualified for the skill because of the word "dejeuner".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KBS826

merci pour l'idiome :) :):)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Wall1989

"Dinner" means "lunch" in northern England - I wrote "dinner" and it got marked wrong


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lesliewilman

At least half the people in England eat their "dinner" at midday. Only the middle classes upwards talk of "lunch". The standard expression for meals served in school at midday is "School Dinner". However, lots of children eat a "packed lunch" instead.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/YvetteFox

I put dinner too as we have breakfast, dinner and tea in our family! We also have snap boxes and snap bags as we sometimes have 'snap' instead of dinner! Came on here to see what others were saying.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AmyBirch01

We also have 'breakfast', 'dinner' and 'tea'. So 'dinner' really should be accepted as it is a more correct term for mid-day meal.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nikitakimba

You should probably avoid synonyms. The drop-down menu didn't suggest "dinner"

"Dinner" in France (or some parts of it) is the evening meal.

In Australia, for example, "dinner" is the main meal served in the evening, but some Aussies prefer to refer to that meal as "tea". Other parts of the world call the evening meal "supper."

I guess I'm saying that you can't expect Duo to accept all regional differences within the English-speaking community, or where usage of that word causes a conflict with their own definitions.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gempaw

I still think dinner should be accepted as 'déjeuner' does mean 'dinner' in English. If there are various words we use like 'lunch' and 'dinner' (that is only two really), they should both be acceptable.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/extremeblueness

But for Americans, dinner means the evening/night meal. Americans have breakfast when they wake up, lunch at midday, and dinner at the end of the day.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hud214

Thanksgiving dinner at 2:00pm, maybe even noon!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/madamebutterfly5

The drip down menues are totally unreliable, they can give a word and then mark it wrong


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tachy90

I'm not suggesting that Duo should offer it as a suggested translation, but it really does frustrate me that these questions never accept "dinner" as an answer, even though it's not really incorrect. Whenever I get one of these questions, my first impulse is always to write "dinner": it's the word i would ordinarily use in day to day speech (the evening meal is "tea"), and furthermore, it looks a lot like "déjeuner". This nearly always trips me up, especially in the timed exercises when i don't have time to think 'oh, but Duo expects me to call it "lunch"', and yet i know the meaning of the French word.

I guess i could keep losing points and hitting "my answer should be accepted", but i think it would be ignored, so i'm just kinda venting here.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AmyBirch01

dinner is also lunch in the midlands of England. I did the exact same thing and it was also rejected. :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/i-lumos

Then translation lists both breakfast and lunch; which one is it, and how can I tell which one is meant in a sentence?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/z7niko7z

I believe that usually "déjeuner" is used for lunch and "petit-déjeuner" for breakfast. so a little lunch would be a breakfast, rather odd logic if you ask me!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ExoticMatter

Outside of France, "déjeuner" is breakfast; in Belgium, Canada, Switzerland, and Congo, "dîner" is lunch; and in the first three countries, "souper" is supper. In France, "dîner" is an evening meal and the main meal of the day, and "souper" is a light meal eaten at night (later than dîner). The more you know.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/castguy

You are correct. I live in Quebec and I almost entered breakfast for my answer!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Maeii

That is correct. While déjeuner means lunch, petit-déjeuner means breakfast.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lilygilder

My teacher said this is because the French don't usually eat a heavy breakfast. It's more of a snack than a real meal. -> http://www.healthguidance.org/entry/15260/1/What-Is-a-Traditional-French-Breakfast.html


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/arutopiah

I thought it means "breakfast" since it sounds like "desayuno" in spanish.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mdupree

I confuse it as well with this all the time.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TeaAndSmileDip

True, but isnt breakfast supposed to be ''the most important meal of the day''? XD


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sonjarose

I want my heart back! how is a correct answer "You eat my luncheon!"...who the hell would say that


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AmyBirch01

Luncheon is the term that was used in Tudor England and has more historically been used among aristocracy within the UK. It is still used today though usage has decreased somewhat. However I have known it to be spoken sometimes as a mock to the upper classes and other times just because. It is said by many people still today though more commonly the mid-day meal is known as 'dinner' or in colloquial English, 'lunch'.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hud214

I don't know who the hell would say "You eat my luncheon!". A "luncheon" is a group of ladies having lunch together at somebody's house for some reason. There has to be some reason. You can't just have a "luncheon". Perhaps your wife's bible studygroup might have a "luncheon" Don't ask me what they do there. I have no idea!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AmyBirch01

Technically no one would say "You eat my luncheon", you would have to say "You are eating my luncheon". In addition, the word "luncheon" actually saw a slight peak around 2010 though this was not as high as the middle of the first half of the 20th century. I have known it to be used several times and as a GCSE student I can quite safely say that none of those occurrences have been to do with "a group of ladies having lunch together at somebody's house for some reason" plus that is rather sexist in our modern day equal society. In society generally luncheon is actually used less rarely than you may think.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tachy90

I find "luncheon" sorta funny. Like it's not wrong, but, if you're gonna say it, you have to put on your daintiest posh person voice and stick out your little finger while sipping your piping hot Darjeeling.

It's right that Duo accepts quirky synonyms like this. Who knows, maybe the queen will take this course, i'm sure she'd be frightfully put out if it wasn't accepted, what!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PeaceJoyPancakes

Personally I think of a luncheon as the event (a formal gathering over lunch) rather than the meal itself, though others might apply the word to the meal itself too.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/girly43

LOL I will store that in my mind for later


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/wildlyglam

what would the sentence be for- "you ATE my lunch"? What would the difference be?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NeilCockling

"Tu as mangé mon déjeuner." But the course has only taught us the present tense so far.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EmeraldBear

In Canadian french déjeuner is breakfast so that word always confuses me on this site.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kimi857086

Yeah, in french 'petit déjeuner' means breakfast


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CheyenneKelp

In Belgium dejeuner means lunch :/ and that's where I learned French


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PeaceJoyPancakes

I drink your milkshake.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/butters900

what happened! breakfast is an acceptable word.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TobyBartels

It's accepted now.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/faraston3001

why is ''you are having my lunch'' not correct?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SummerYLWong

It's because the word for eat ( manges ) is in that sentence. You are having my lunch would be, Vous avez mon déjeuner.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CraigBotha

@Wall1989, most of the English speaking world have theri dinner at night i.e. supper. @enwired, don't you mean that having someone for luch is to defeat them? as in "I will eat you for lunch!"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hud214

how can "you are eating my lunch" be an interesting sentence and "he finishes her meal" isn't?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/extremeblueness

Because if someone finishes your meal, you probably gave them permission to.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DuoLogue

It didn't accept, "You ate my lunch!" Why is that? Is 'ate' not appropriate?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kimi857086

'Ate' is past tense, duo hasnt covered that yet.... but it would be 'Tu as mangé mon dejeuner'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TommayJ

I DRINK YOUR MILKSHAKE! I DRINK IT UP!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SamashyX

Why isn't ate my lunch??


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NeilCockling

That would be past tense.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/waverlyexrp

i said "you're eating my breakfast" and it said i was wrong.. SORRY BUT I'M CANADIAN


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rachel145537

I said you eat my lunch-isn't that supposed to be right?

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