https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FarnworthPatrick

German Beyond Duolingo

I'm approaching the end of the german skill tree for duolingo. I do intend to keep practising my german and strengthening it on a daily basis, but I would like to continue broadening my horizons and learning. Is there anything I can move on to as a next step. I hope to get a german pen pal soon so that will help but what else can I do?

Thanks in advance,

Patrick

March 26, 2015

17 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Briskrisk

Read a few short stories in German. Skype or other means of talking with a native speaker. Watch youtube videos, movies, etc in german (subtitles help.

P.S. Doing the reverse tree is another option.

March 26, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FarnworthPatrick

Reverse tree?

March 26, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Briskrisk

Say you originally took the course German for English speakers the reverse tree would be English for German speakers.

March 26, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FarnworthPatrick

That's an interesting idea. I might give that a go.

March 26, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/izzitty

That's a great idea, Briskrisk. I'm gonna try that when I finish my German tree. Danke.

March 27, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Briskrisk

Gern Geschehen :)

March 27, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/guitarluehe

My mother tongue is German. But I made the French and Spanish Tree and half of the Italian tree from English. Now I have switched to Spanish fo do the spanish and Italian tree.

I do like podcasts very much. You should check the "deutsche Welle" for material.

here a very easy sitcom for leaners: http://www.planet-schule.de/wissenspool/extra/inhalt/extra-deutsch.html#

March 26, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lorel90

You are going to do Spanish from Spanish?

March 26, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/guitarluehe

Oh sorry I meant French and Italian

March 27, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GregHullender

Read.

Try online newspapers. Use an online dictonary, as required. If it's hard, don't try more than a paragraph a day or so at first. News is easier than editorials. But read every day and work your way up.

Do Duolingo's Immersion, but don't obsess over the point system. Translate from scratch, don't other other translations, and try to learn from it if someone corrects you.

When newspaper articles are easy to read, try reading novels on a Kindle. This will advance your ability in all skills (even listening and conversation) more than you'd believe. Reading is the only kind of immersion most of us can do without travelling somewhere.

http://gregreflects.blogspot.com/2014/09/how-to-read-foreign-novel-on-kindle.html

March 27, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lorel90

I am also about tho finish the German tree (1 more skill to go). I am also wondering what to do next, a tutor is one of my ideas as well as another class. I already read and watch German TV.

March 26, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Slydiad

I'm a big fan of German-learning podcasts. Deutsche-Welle's "Deutsch, warum nicht" will start out really easy if you're already most of the way through the tree, but I appreciated going through all of it. Even when you already know the concept they're teaching that lesson, the listening exercises are really good. After that, I like DaZPod, which is a similar format, but both the listening exercises and the explanations are in German. I definitely do still need explanations of dialogues involving German words I don't know, but it's nice to know I'm good enough at German not to need them in English.

March 28, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sfbaydawg

Check out "Langsam Gesprochene Nachrichten" on Deutsche Welle. You can subscribe to their RSS feed. It will take some time for you to warm up to the type of words that are used in a news broadcast, but if you are patient, it will serve as a great vocabulary builder. In addition, since news are always reported using the Subjunctive Mood (type 1) along with the passive voice, this will reinforce some grammar too. Maintain a spreadsheet of new words you encounter. There are flashcard apps that allow you to import Google Docs spreadsheets. Google Translate allows you to store your translations in the cloud. In addition keep a good offline dictionary handy. I personally use dict.cc (the paid version) on my android devices.

March 28, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FarnworthPatrick

Only now do I find out I can use a spreadsheet. I spent a week putting together a really complicated java program that works as a flash card type thing! Oh well... I can program now.

April 26, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Satyanaray217508

Hi Patrick, I am Satya from India and have reached learning aggregates of 58%. I still feel there is plenty of scope in doing it again and again to reach a level of 70% in order to be moderately confident to venture into speaking. Post this, to get a germanic accent will take a little more time of learning, observing and understanding. I also feel that its time to have someone with who I can try speaking. Its going to be very difficult but its worth the try. Thanks and kind regards.....

June 12, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rontaya

What is the advantage to doing the reverse tree? You hear the audio in English and the lessons are to learn English grammar?

July 4, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Pietzsche

It's harder to be given a sentence in your native language, and to come up with a translation into a foreign language, than just to recognize familiar foreign words and translate them into your native language. The way duolingo is structured, many exercises involve identifying/recognizing foreign words and sentences, and then writing the native language equivalent. If you do the reverse tree, you are more frequently challenged to produce foreign translations for your native language. It's a way of exercising the language at a deeper level (but you also have to do a bunch of exercises that do test just English, so that's a drag.)

December 18, 2017
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