"Él ayuda al maestro."

Translation:He helps the teacher.

5 years ago

50 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Bisade

When should 'al' be used?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Royraju

When we have "a el", we use the contraction "al". In this case "Él ayuda a el maestro" = "El ayuda al maestro".

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/trunketti

Makes sense to me. Thanks.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GaelBraxton

so the sentence reads; he helps to the teacher? And 'to the' becomes 'al'?????

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/espanola_amanda

But in this case, the "a" doesn't have a corresponding word in English, because the "personal a" is only a Spanish construction. So, it doesn't translate to "He helps to the teacher", it is just "He helps the teacher", but in Spanish, "él ayuda al maestro". Sometimes "a" does mean "to", but not here.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gmorneau

I think of it as 'gives help' so I can remember to use the 'a'. So in my mind it reads more like: He gives help to the teacher. Hopefully, this trick might 'give help' to someone else too. :-)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Royraju

Yes, "to the" = "a el" = "al".

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Bethany_Lang

so just like when you say it's instead of it is ?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Royraju

A little difference: English contractions are optional, but they are required in Spanish.

However, we don't make the contraction when the EL is a part of a name (a city, for instance).

http://www.studyspanish.com/lessons/contr.htm

http://www.dummies.com/how-to/content/creating-contractions-with-articles-in-spanish.html

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/wendy535599

Thank you very much. As when we have de el we use del.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/THeNeeno

Al is a+el. You need the 'a' here because a person is the direct object.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JaxKandu

Stop talking about the personal "a" in this example. That is not why you need the "a". You are confusing the issue. Here is the answer: http://www.elearnspanishlanguage.com/grammar/verb/verbswithprep-a.html

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/espanola_amanda

Actually, this sentence is definitely an example of the personal "a" (Spanish teacher here). The link you provided notes verbs which require an "a" if the "verb + a" is followed by an infinitive. "Ayudar" is one of these. So, if I wanted to say "She helps clean the room", I would say "Ella ayuda a limpiar el cuarto". If the verb "ayudar" is not followed by an infinitive, it usually still needs the "a" after it, but that is the personal "a", because normally, when you speak of helping, you help a person. That is shown in this sentence, "él ayuda al maestro".

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AramPirjan

Wish this had more votes

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ElliottofRivia

I guess as a German learner, it makes sense to me to use 'a' because "to help" in German takes an indirect object, and is thought of as "give help to" or "render assistance to". Got it. Ayudar a = jmdm. helfen.

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
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Actually you have it wrong. This isn't a dative or indirect object issue. The à here is something that is pretty unique to Spanish in my experience, at least it doesn't exist in English, German, French, Italian or Portuguese. It is called the personal a. In Spanish when the DIRECT object is a person or a pet, it is always preceeded by an a. Well when I say always, I mean always according to the listed rules and exceptions. It doesn't happen with the verb tener or any tense of haber meaning there is or there are. And it isn't used with an indefinite person. This link will explain it better. But you do have to be aware of it because it does make the direct object seem to be an indirect object and that can throw off the whole meaning sometimes.

https://studyspanish.com/grammar/lessons/persa

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ImpInTraining

Thank you. A gives direction. He helps. Whom does he give his help? TO the teacher.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HaroldGarry

Thank you for accurate information.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sandeepa2
sandeepa2
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Muchas gracias

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/zereoue20

Why would this not be "Él ayuda el maestro?" I don't remember seeing exactly why we use a+el= al as opposed to just el.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Royraju

We always say "ayudar + a", so you need "al" in this case; "el" is wrong".

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/zereoue20

Ok, thanks. That's very helpful, Royraju

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Royraju

De nada, Zereoue. :)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/karthur

In most cases, when the direct object is a noun or personal pronoun describing a person, or an animal we care about, then the word "a" is used between the verb (e.g. "ayuda") and the direct object (e.g. "el maestro") .

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ttbaby9
ttbaby9
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This is the clearest explanation I've encountered. Thanks so much! (I don't know how to give lingots, sorry!)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Eddie225252

Is the same true for a noun ending in "a"? For instance, would it be correct to say 'él ayuda a la profesora" or is it still "al" profesora?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Royraju

Él ayuda al profesor.

Él ayuda a la profesora.

"al" = only for "a el", there is no contraction with "a la".

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rjraven135

Teachers pet.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Angelina196588

Ikr i was gonna say that lmao

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hortie

What is the difference between "helps" and "assists"? My dictionary lists "assists" under ayudar!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lucky101man

'Ayudante' means assistant.. So I expected ayuda to mean assists but its not accepted as of oct/14 but reported.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hanboning
hanboning
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ayudar ~ "aid", "adjutant"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/katydekitty

Think of ayuda as aid to remember the word

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NicHunter11

It is so clear now thanks so much

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/__Dominika__

In my opinion, the translation of this word can also be 'maestro' . As I checked, such word exists in English language. Because of that 'mistake' that isn't actually a mistake I have to do all revision once again.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/brucethegirl

I first read it as "He helps himself to the teacher" because of the english translation hints.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ash473779
Ash473779
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Is ayuda pronounced 'A-yu-tha' ?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LucasFreem2

what does gender masculine mean?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ellie19981998

We say '' El ayuda a su madre '' according to some other example , then why not say '' El ayuda a maestro '' and say '' El ayuda al maestro '' ? I'm confused !

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Andreaja69
Andreaja69
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'El ayuda a maestro' would mean, 'He helps teacher', which is not good English. Here it is, 'He helps the teacher', 'Él ayuda al maestro.'

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/J.C.Fink
J.C.Fink
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Aha! I was able to successfully guess the meaning of "ayuda". Back in the 70's my family spent a summer in Rome. The daughters, 5 and 8, learned a bit of Italian. We sublet an apartment down in the city center whose bathroom had one of those old-fashioned water closets up near the ceiling to give a gravity assist to the flush. A handle was suspended below it on a chain. The 5-year-old was too short to reach the handle, so she would come out and call, "Aiuto, per favore!" - "help, please". ayuda - aiuto - yep, it worked.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dushyant522668

Ayuda= AYUrveDA.. it helps healing fast

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KittyKattyCutie5

omg thats funny am I the only one who understood that?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KittyKattyCutie5

Why did they use "al" instead of "y" or "e"?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
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You seem to have misunderstood this sentence. Your suggestions of y or e both mean and. There is no and on this sentence. Al is the required contraction of a + el. The a is the personal a which is required whenever the direct object is any person or a beloved pet. El maestro is the direct object of the verb ayudar, to help.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lacy200740

I'm pretty new at this and just to help myself I put "He helps the male teacher". I recognize you wouldn't really translate it this way but why is it wrong? I think that technically it is correct

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
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It is not incorrect, but it certainly does not meet Duo's common for common convention. In English we would say the male teacher to add some information that would help identify which teacher he helped. So that would assume that there was more than one in question. In Spanish it would be an error to call a female teacher à maestro just as it would be wrong to call a male teacher à maestra. This grouping of people by their gender impacts so many expressions we don't even think about in English. If you have all daughters, you cannot talk about your children without specifying that they are girls, and if you say mis hijos to someone who doesn't know you you may have to specify whether you are talking about all your children or just your sons if you have at least one daughter. A teacher cannot just say come with a parent because parents is padres, so they would have to say uno de tus padres. Similarly a child could say that they had two mothers, but not easily that they have two fathers. It is therefore not a good translation for the normal sentence to underline a distinction that cannot be absent in the Spanish sentence but would only be added for clarity in the English one.

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Nicolas253024

Lingot now!

7 months ago
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