Duolingo is the most popular way to learn languages in the world. Best of all, it's 100% free!

"Biz bu adamı tanıyoruz."

Translation:We know this man.

3 years ago

47 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/adamyoung97
adamyoung97
  • 15
  • 15
  • 15
  • 14
  • 13
  • 13
  • 12
  • 10
  • 9
  • 8
  • 8

Does adam take the suffix because of bu (and would it if şu were used)?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/asdzxvasd

yea you got it :D also if o was used.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rkvance5
rkvance5
  • 13
  • 12
  • 12
  • 11
  • 11
  • 9
  • 9
  • 9
  • 8
  • 8
  • 8
  • 8
  • 8
  • 7
  • 7
  • 7
  • 6
  • 6
  • 6
  • 5
  • 4
  • 3
  • 3
  • 3

Yes, bu makes the noun definite. Extra definite actually.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/johaquila
johaquila
  • 16
  • 16
  • 15
  • 15
  • 14
  • 14
  • 12
  • 10
  • 8

Yes and no:

  • Biz bu adamı tanıyoruz. - We know this man.
  • Biz şu adamı tanıyoruz. - We know that man.
  • Biz o adamı tanıyoruz. - We know that man.
  • Biz adamı tanıyoruz. - We know the man.
  • Biz adam tanıyoruz. - We know a man. / We know men.

To make it explicit: Because of bu, adam is necessarily definite in this sentence. Since adam is definite, it is put in the accusative when it is the direct object. Without bu (or something equivalent), adam could be definite or indefinite depending on context. Unlike in European languages that have cases, the accusative is not used with indefinite direct objects.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Light_Aura

what if we put "bu" without "ı", "biz bu adam tanıyoruz", isnt "bu" enough (sufficient) to specify whom we are talking about ?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AlexinNotTurkey
AlexinNotTurkey
Mod
  • 25
  • 23
  • 21
  • 18
  • 14
  • 14
  • 13
  • 13
  • 12
  • 10
  • 9
  • 8
  • 7
  • 7
  • 6
  • 5
  • 4
  • 3
  • 2
  • 393

It requires the accusative case to be correct, otherwise you will sound like you are speaking broken Turkish.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo
mizinamo
  • 20
  • 17
  • 16
  • 14
  • 14
  • 14
  • 13
  • 11
  • 10
  • 10
  • 9
  • 8
  • 8
  • 7
  • 6
  • 6
  • 4
  • 4
  • 4
  • 3
  • 2

That's a bit like asking, What if we put "five" without "s", "I have five apple", isn't "five" enough (sufficient) to specify that there are more than one apple?

Which is perfectly good logic from the point view of a Turk or Hungarian... but English simply doesn't work that way.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jwild94
Jwild94
  • 12
  • 10
  • 9
  • 5

And perfectly good enough logic from the point of view of a Persian (Iranian/Afghan/Tajik) as well. (just my two cents).

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AmbeRenee
AmbeRenee
  • 11
  • 10
  • 6
  • 5

Whats the difference between taniyor and biliyor?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lucaturilli

'tanımak' is knowing someone, recognizing a person while 'bilmek' is knowing information, have knowledge of something. They are similar to 'conoscere' and 'sapere' in Italian.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Quattrostelle

In Italian you use 'conoscere' for places too. In Turkish, do you use tanımak for places ("Istanbul'u tanıyorum")? Would there be a difference between "Istanbul'u tanıyorum" and "Istanbul'u biliyorum"?

Also, if I wanted to say "I know Istanbul well" would I use the aorist or the present continuous?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ilknr1
ilknr1
  • 12
  • 10
  • 2

No, we do not say "İstanbul'u/İzmir'i/Çanakkale'yi etc. tanıyorum." and secondly, you can say both "İstanbul'u iyi bilirim" /"İstanbul'u iyi biliyorum."

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mal876365
mal876365
  • 19
  • 16
  • 9
  • 3
  • 111

like in spanish conocer y saber

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AmbeRenee
AmbeRenee
  • 11
  • 10
  • 6
  • 5

Thank you!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lucaturilli

you're welcome

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GershTri

I thought the Turkish present was like the English continuous (yazıyorum = I am writing) and the Turkish aorist like the English simple present (yazırım = I write), the latter being used to express regular behavior, habits, etc. But you would never say "We are knowing this man." in English, so I'm a little confused. Is there a rule for when the Turkish present continuous is used to describe behaviors and states that actually exist outside of the immediate circumstances, i.e. where the aorist would intuitively seem more appropriate for an English speaker?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/aucunLien
aucunLien
  • 18
  • 15
  • 10
  • 7

As a non native speaker of english, i will tell you that your language use of simple vs. continuous present isn't always intuitive either. I think for both languages, there will just be a few verbs - i'd say mostly very common ones - for which you just have to remember that one tense is used rather than the other.

So to know=tanımak > continuous present even though i agree, aorist seems to make more sense as it is hard to imagine how forgetting a person is a likely enough outcome to acknowledge. (Another way to look at it though, that i'm infering form google translate, is that it means 'to recognize'/'to identify' rather than 'to know', in which case present continuous seems a better fit and still, one can imagine how switching to "to know" will yield a better translation into english.)

The other way around, there is to see=görmek, for which turkish uses continuous while english uses simple present ("I see it") - the continuous present choice makes a lot more sense to me...

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vvsey
vvsey
  • 25
  • 25
  • 23
  • 20
  • 14
  • 9
  • 6
  • 4
  • 3
  • 3
  • 2
  • 2
  • 46

I am agreeing with you. And I am seeing this person. And I am wanting to eat something, right now, because I am hungry. All the above are sounding strange, or they mean something other than they "should"; their literal meaning may be much closer to the truth but they took up some other meanıing instead. But this is just how languages are; they have irregularities that can't be described by rules.

"Ben onu görüyorum" - can't be translated as "I am seeing him/her", even though the rules would dictate that.

We have to live with it. Better yet: embrace it. The good news is, I think Turkish is much more regulated than English is.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/frankenstein724
frankenstein724
  • 17
  • 13
  • 12
  • 9
  • 6
  • 5
  • 4
  • 4
  • 2

He's right, though, about the intuitiveness of it from an outsider's perspective. Apparently it is more common than not outside of English for the continuous to be used in this way.

As another example, I took a "field methods" class which is a linguistic class about studying (relatively) undocumented languages, and learning the process for doing that. We had, as our consultant, a native speaker of Shi (a bantu language). The way this worked is that we would give him a sentence in English and he would tell us the sentence in Shi, and we would transcribe it on the board. Anyway, we quickly learned that we had to specify the duration of the event. If we simply said "I see you", the form of the verb in the translation he gave, we found out, inherently implies habitual, English's "I see you", in Shi, implies "(from time to time) I see you". Conversely, of course, when we told him that we want to know how to say "I see you (as in, right now you are in my vision)", the verb form was equivalent to saying "I am seeing you" which, of course, in English, sounds weird.

Whether or not it sounds "weird" in English (which, I agree, it would sound very weird to say "I am seeing you"), it actually does make a lot more sense to me for it to be this other way in so many languages. So, yes, languages have inherent differences that should be embraced/celebrated/etc, but it's not so much that something like this difference can't be explained by a "rule", it's that, between the language pair, the rule doesn't so much matter, if that makes sense. The "rules" do -not- dictate that you should translate "Ben onu görüyorum" as "I am seeing you", but they -do- dictate that you translate "I see you" as "Ben onu görüyorum", and it's a matter of what is going on cognitively based on the language. :-P

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Eclectic1234

Just to throw my two cents into the conversation, the use of the continuous in English can be idiomatic. For instance, "I am seeing someone" can mean that I am dating someone, but "I am seeing a doctor about that" means that I have seen and will continue to see a doctor about it. In the future, you can say "I'll be seeing you" as well as "I'll see you." "Love" is generally not used used in the continuous, but as the McDonald's campaign ("I'm lovin' it") showed, there is a colloquial usage that means "I am really enjoying this right now (or these days). " I might say it of a book that I'm reading; I won't know until I finish if I love it or not, but right now I'm loving it.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GershTri

I appreciate the discussion, but just for the record, I wasn't trying to claim that some languages are more intuitive than others. I was just asking if there is a rule that might confirm, or contradict, my intuitions "as an English speaker". There seems to be a great deal of overlap between English and Turkish continuous forms, I was just trying to find out how far that similarity goes.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vvsey
vvsey
  • 25
  • 25
  • 23
  • 20
  • 14
  • 9
  • 6
  • 4
  • 3
  • 3
  • 2
  • 2
  • 46

It stops right here. :) Seriously, I think Turkish uses the "present continuous" more freely, and perhaps more logically in some cases, than English.

Let's take the "see" example again. "I am seeing you". Hadn't it acquired a different meaning over time, it should logically imply that you are currently in my field of vision. But it doesn't because it shifted to mean something else. So we say "There you are! I can see you now!" as a way of expressing that you are in our field of vision. Logically speaking, "I see you", "I date you", "We are in a relationsip" etc. would be better choices of describing the situation. But language doesn't necessarily care about logic. So, back to the point.

Let's take a few of these verbs that English likes to use in the simple present: "see", "know", "want", "understand", "think". I propose that when we say these in a normal situation in the simple present, we usually mean the right now, current present situation that could be more logically expressed by the present continuous.

I (can) see the tree. - happening right now, it's in my vision

What time is it? I don't know. - I usually know it, I knew it yesterday when I looked at the clock, but currently, right now, I don't know.

I want to go home. - happening right now.

I understand. - somebody just told me something and I get it. I mean, I am getting it. Right now.

I think so. What do you think? - right now

See what I mean? If so, and if you agree with my logic, in these situations you can safely bet that Turkish uses the continuous form.

This is by no means a rule, just a general guideline I use. Also, in Turkish, I think you can easily get away with using the continuous form almost anywhere you want to use the present. Even in describing habitual, usual situations. Her gün saat altıda kalkıyorum. Perfect. People will understand. And they will be very understanding.

Again, this is not a rule, just an observation.

For the usage on general verbs (simple tense), let me quote my favorite book, Elementary Turkish:

"The general verb forms express what is always true and hence timeless" Like "Mice like cheese. Children will fight. The postman comes each day." "The general verb forms express general validity, and habitual and customary action. Since what is always true will also be true in the future, the general also may be used as a future tense. It may also be used to express an intention on the speaker's part, a promise of sorts."

Two more thoughts:

  • Teşekkür ederim. I wonder why this is the most common form. Perhaps because it is already way too much of a mouthful, without the "iyor" part.

  • A man sits in a bar in Istanbul, drinking. His Turkish friend walks up to him and asks: "Ne içiyorsun?" - What are you drinking? Then the bartender walks up to them and asks the new arrival: "Ne içersiniz?" - What do you want/intend to drink? This latter drinking is not happening yet, but is about to happen. That's the intention, the very close future. Hopefully.

Enough of me. Teşekkür ediyorum.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/luisetxe
luisetxe
  • 15
  • 10
  • 8
  • 7

In my case, I am a Spanish native speaker.

In Spanish, ALL verbs can be used with either Present Continuous or Present Simple; the former to emphasize that the action is actually happening right now.

Regardless that some cases make more or less sense when used, it is not a syntactic error and all verbs can use both forms. Is it the same case in Turkish? or it is truly an error to use certain verbs in certain modes? Thanks

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/orde90
orde90
  • 11
  • 10

For spanish speakers, the aorist is more like the verb soler and the future tense.

Yürürüm.. - Suelo caminar. or Caminaré. (also for guessing) or Camino (written language)

Yürüyorum. - Camino. or Estoy caminando.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AymanAlMal

Can we say "Biz bu adamı biliyoruz" for the same meaning?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ilknr1
ilknr1
  • 12
  • 10
  • 2

Yes , that is possible.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/belma332

I think tanıyoruz is better for people. :-D

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TalhaKhan5

I know = biliyorum I don't = bilmiyorum Can 'Tanmiyorum' be used like this too?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo
mizinamo
  • 20
  • 17
  • 16
  • 14
  • 14
  • 14
  • 13
  • 11
  • 10
  • 10
  • 9
  • 8
  • 8
  • 7
  • 6
  • 6
  • 4
  • 4
  • 4
  • 3
  • 2

Nearly - it's tanımıyorum, with ı because of vowel harmony and with an ı before the m as well, since the root is tanı-, i.e. it ends in a vowel, as opposed to bil-, which ends in a consonant.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/michalisl
michalisl
  • 25
  • 25
  • 22
  • 21
  • 19
  • 15
  • 14
  • 629

what is the difference between taniyorum and biliyorum? Thanks, Michael

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo
mizinamo
  • 20
  • 17
  • 16
  • 14
  • 14
  • 14
  • 13
  • 11
  • 10
  • 10
  • 9
  • 8
  • 8
  • 7
  • 6
  • 6
  • 4
  • 4
  • 4
  • 3
  • 2

More or less like the difference between conoscere/conocer/kennen/γνωρίζω and sapere/saber/wissen/ξέρω.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AlexinNotTurkey
AlexinNotTurkey
Mod
  • 25
  • 23
  • 21
  • 18
  • 14
  • 14
  • 13
  • 13
  • 12
  • 10
  • 9
  • 8
  • 7
  • 7
  • 6
  • 5
  • 4
  • 3
  • 2
  • 393

Be careful though...this is only mostly true (at least for kennen/wissen...this is an easy way to tell if a Turk grew up in Germany)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo
mizinamo
  • 20
  • 17
  • 16
  • 14
  • 14
  • 14
  • 13
  • 11
  • 10
  • 10
  • 9
  • 8
  • 8
  • 7
  • 6
  • 6
  • 4
  • 4
  • 4
  • 3
  • 2

I see, thank you!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/michalisl
michalisl
  • 25
  • 25
  • 22
  • 21
  • 19
  • 15
  • 14
  • 629

Thank you very much dear friend, vielen herzlichen Dank, jetzt kenne ich genau den Unterschied, Michael

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JoaoDSouza
JoaoDSouza
  • 15
  • 14
  • 13
  • 11
  • 11
  • 11
  • 11
  • 11
  • 10
  • 10
  • 9
  • 9
  • 8
  • 8
  • 7
  • 7
  • 6
  • 6
  • 6
  • 5
  • 4

Is it like French? Bilmek is savoir and Tanımak is connaître?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lucaturilli

Basically. But i should warn you about scope differences.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lidorlerden

If i say adam and not adami it will be mestake?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo
mizinamo
  • 20
  • 17
  • 16
  • 14
  • 14
  • 14
  • 13
  • 11
  • 10
  • 10
  • 9
  • 8
  • 8
  • 7
  • 6
  • 6
  • 4
  • 4
  • 4
  • 3
  • 2

Yes.

"adam" is the object here, and it is definite because it has "bu" in front of it. Definite objects take the accusative case, so it must be adamı here.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gazafek
gazafek
  • 25
  • 20
  • 11
  • 10
  • 8
  • 8
  • 7
  • 4
  • 3
  • 3
  • 3
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2

Is it common to say Biz biliyoruz bu adamı?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MuhammadSRashed
MuhammadSRashed
  • 23
  • 16
  • 16
  • 12
  • 11
  • 7
  • 6
  • 6
  • 6
  • 6
  • 5
  • 5
  • 5
  • 4
  • 3
  • 3
  • 3
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 1244

The verb has to come at the end, especially in written language!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CuteKench1

Konu present continuous niye böyle oldu ki

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Marie392547
Marie392547
  • 22
  • 11
  • 10
  • 8
  • 251

Please, how do you pronounce "tanıyoruz". Does the "ı" nearly fade when pronouncing this verb? I am not really able to understand well the audition.

Thank you for replying! :)

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/acxnxr

it fades a bit

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Marie392547
Marie392547
  • 22
  • 11
  • 10
  • 8
  • 251

Thank you! :)

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/David1277

Could it not be :We are meeting that man?

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Eclectic1234

No. If you look up "tanımak," you can see the different meanings. Here it translates as "We know this man" because we don't use "know" in the present continuous in English. ("We are knowing this man" sounds funny.) Depending on context, it might also mean "We are getting to know this man" or "We are becoming acquainted...." If you want to say "We are meeting this man," you could use "tanışmak" or "görüşmek" or "buluşmak." Biz bu adamı buluşuyoruz. Biz bu adamı tanışıyoruz.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/saleem337375

I think there is some of weakpoint in Dulingo which is : you can't get the full Rule for everything .. you just hear , Read , and try to extract the Rule by your own understanding and maybe you go wrong with that ..for example: 70 % of Turkish learners who are in advanced stages here have no Idea about : the ketchup Rule or festuk şehap Rule or the phonetic Rule for o ö u ü a ä at the end of each word etc .. please keep it in consideration

1 year ago