1. Forum
  2. >
  3. Topic: French
  4. >
  5. "Je suis devant la boulangeri…

"Je suis devant la boulangerie."

Translation:I am in front of the bakery.

March 27, 2015

18 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mcdongers

Why do many English speakers expect rules for the English language to apply to the French language? Why not just try to learn French by understanding its rules?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/elDubl

In Australia, you'll commonly hear people refering to being 'out the front/out front' of somewhere as in 'I'm out the front of the bakery'. I've reported this for all the Aussies on DL.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Anthony317702

Yeah this one just got me too haha


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lsmith-wd

I answered in front of the baker's. Why was this wrong?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tyler-Jeanette

Because the word in the phrase was "la boulangerie" (bakery). A baker is "un boulanger". If you wanted to translate that more literally, perhaps you could say "chez le boulanger" (the baker's place). But that seems to be long-winded.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lsmith-wd

Thank you for that clear and concise explanation.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Janus8536

Noted in passing: According to Longman's online Dictionary of Contemporary English '(the) baker's' is BrE and means the same as '(the) bakery'. http://www.ldoceonline.com/dictionary/bakery


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Perseph1955

American English would also be fine with saying "the baker's" for "bakery." It's just not the translation of the French given here.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sitesurf

Legally you cannot claim your shop is "une boulangerie" if the bread is not made on the spot by a "boulanger" (owner or employee).

A shop selling bread made elsewhere is "un dépôt de pain".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Janus8536

To Sitesurf: Seriously? Given that both 'the bakery' and 'the baker's' can here only mean the place/shop where bread is baked and sold (la boulangerie), would a native speaker really use such a decidedly less “elegant” – albeit grammatically correct – construct to say the same thing in French?

(PS: Although my question in response to Perseph's comment was meant to make a point rather than to elicit an answer, it's always nice to see you checking in on these forums, for which I thank you.)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sitesurf

What I meant is that "devant chez" (2 propositions in a row) sounds less fluid.
Any of "devant la boulangerie" and "devant chez le boulanger" are commonly used anyway.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sitesurf

"je suis devant chez le boulanger" (not very elegant)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DarinkaZa

Can you also say «devant de la boulangerie»?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/georgeoftruth

The "de" is not necessary. The preposition "devant" already means "in front of."

http://www.larousse.fr/dictionnaires/francais-anglais/devant/24821


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sitesurf

"sur le devant de" = on the front of


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Libellule808

This is so my life! That's where I always am.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/The_Mutant

what's the difference between avant and devant?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sitesurf

"Avant" is temporal and "devant" is spacial.

Learn French in just 5 minutes a day. For free.