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"¡Ya basta!"

Translation:Enough already!

5 years ago

20 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/babatabita
babatabita
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I guess, another acceptable English translation would be "enough now". Also, the dictionary hints for 'ya' list "now" as a possible translation.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jdabell
jdabell
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How can 'enough already' be correct and 'already enough' be wrong?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Luis
LuisPlus
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Thanks. We'll fix this soon. By the way, for such issues, it is best to report the problem using the feedback form instead of the discussion.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MicahHerstand
MicahHerstand
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I don't know any English speakers who would say "Already enough!" But I know plenty who would say "Enough already!". The former may be used within a longer sentence ("What you've done for us is already enough.") but not as its own colloquial phrase as this translation implies.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/taina05

Totally agree.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Daniel-in-BC

Agreed. As an exclamation, it's "Enough already!" "Already enough!" is just unnatural: I would never say it and I've never heard it.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kowal5ki

I don't think "Already enough" should be accepted? I can't think of a context in which it would be used.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ComicOzzie

Because "already enough" makes no sense.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Charley-Farley

Just to add to the discussion from an English point of view - I agree with Roger Burke that it makes me think of a stereotypical Jew. No one I know in England would use that phrase - except as parody

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Skully

Why is this sentence in the section about Verbs Present III ?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/integra1
integra1
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because bastar is a verb....

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
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¿Verdad?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ranchers1

Bastar= verb "to be enough". i.e. "We need another fighter" "Yo basto" I am enough "Tú bastas" You are enough, etc.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/klaakan

My VOX Everyday Span/Eng dictionary lists "That's enough" as another way to translate this phrase, but DL will probably not accept it.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Luis
LuisPlus
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It is accepted :)

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/klaakan

Gracias, Luis! I'm so glad to know that a REAL Person from DL is involved! It makes it feel like there is a living teacher behind the computer robot! I know I get so frustrated at times, trying to predict what the computer will accept. Thank you for being there!

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Roger_Burke

There is a problem with "Enough already." It is not a Standard English in its construction. When I hear "Enough Already" I begin thinking I have been teleported to a Jewish community in New York. Picture a Jewish mother speaking to a recalcitrant child, "First you tell me you didn't eat your chicken soup, then you loose your kipah. Enough already! You are going to be the death of me." I suspect the phrase is fine in Spanish, but in English it might be taken as making fun of an ethnic group. On the other hand, Jews flourished in Spain during the times of Arab governance and were only expelled, burned at the stake, or forced underground under Catholic monarchs. So it is possible that the "Enough already!" may directly descend directly from Spanish history.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cquark
cquark
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Enough already is standard American English, and I've definitely heard the phrase used outside New York City. In Alabama, even. According to Google it's also the name of a show on the Oprah channel hosted by Peter Walsh, who is Australian-American; a political group in Wisconsin upset about gambling; used in several news articles to complain about government/taxes/various cultural issues/spending too much time with Theon's character on Game of Thrones; a drug/alcohol recovery group; some 1998 movie I've never heard of, and a lot more. It's definitely more common/broader in use that you're suggesting.

5 years ago