"Hoycomoconeljuez."

Translation:Today I eat with the judge.

6 years ago

85 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/lwscudder

Sounds like some corruption...

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/felix217

Sounds like south american judge

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/picklsmasterson

really? to me it sounds like my lawyer saing to me, "after we play golf hoy como con el juez and we'll talk about a deal."

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JackRoberts

Don't you just hate it when you retype the word in Spanish? I've missed so many that way.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/shirleydel

Shows just how good you're getting it! Claro? ;?D

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/warriorsfan30

I do that all the time---I thought I was the only one phew

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Chillyfish

no i do not hate it. "hate" is a word with great potent and can affect one's life drastically. try other words such as dislike.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BillOen

As a native English speaker (who has dined with judges once or twice), I would say, "Today, I'm eating with the judge", but this was marked incorrect. This sentence is in present tense and should be added to the acceptable translations.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LewisJ1

Not quite, your sentence is in the progressive present tense, which isn't really used in Spanish. I agree your translation is better though!

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/caiser
caiser
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That tense is used in Spanish, but only when the action is happening. The pharse given by Duo can be said in Spanish as:

  • Hoy como con el juez: I eat with...
  • Hoy voy a comer con el juez: I am going to eat...
  • Hoy comeré con el juez: I'll eat...

If I say: "Hoy, estoy comiendo con el juez" is a different sentence, in the precedent sentences I was talking about an action that it is going to happen in a near future. In the last one I'm talking about an action that is happening in the present.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dhyatt

The Spanish present tense can be translated as progressive present tense, Duolingo should allow for this. In this sentence, it is a better translation.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
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The issue here is that Duo has a tense for tense convention. It is the method that Duo uses to control the tense it wants to drill. In other languages which don't have progressive tenses like French or German, the English progressive is encouraged as a translation for the present as the progressive is essentially the default present tense for Action verbs in English. Spanish uses its progressive tenses much less frequently and only to emphasize that the action is taking place at the moment. But the only way to signal that they want to drill the Spanish progressive is to use the English progressive. There are a few cases on Duo where they have had to ignore the convention because it became too awkward, but that is what's going on.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JohBow

Other places on this site, though, as well as most dictionaries, say that the English present progressive indicative is translatable as the Spanish present indicative, and vice versa.

For instance, the sentences "Tomo vino" and "Bebo vino" can be translated as "I drink wine" or as "I'm drinking wine" depending on context, just as "Como el pan" can be translated as "I eat the bread" or as "I'm eating the bread." As they are here, the first example should translate as "I drink wine," while the second should translate as "I'm eating the bread."

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/THeNeeno

This sentence is Today I eat with the judge. This is most likely going to happen later today. It could be happening right now too. This tense is sometimes used in that manner, but it doesn't have to mean that nor does it literally translate to that.

There is a way to say “I am eating with the judge" if the speaker chooses to be that specific. In context, this could be used in some circumstances when an English speaker would be more inclined to use present progressive, but without context, it is safer to translate what is said, as this totally makes sense as spoken without adding additional interpretation.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jstarr37

"today i eat out the judge" well wow i don't even know what to say.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Daniel_Thomas

I clicked on this discussion to see if anyone else caught that...

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ericsamuel94
ericsamuel94
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If eating doesnt work out... Next time, it would be "Hoy duermo con el juez" Lol.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JT_____11
JT_____11
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i looked at the scentence and i though "huh? i eat the judge? :D

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jarjar420

What an honor!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lynne217088

el juez - the judge - but this was marked incorrect and the answer given as 'the referee'. I looked this up and referee is arbitro it says. Very confused. How do I know when el juez is not the judge?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/beej4484

Strange, my answer "i eat with the judge" was apparently wrong! I should have used referee!!??

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LeoMurphy5

I said "Today I eat with the referee." It says I am wrong but gives that as a translation for juez.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DrewTait

Juez = judge not referee

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Athalia2

I've noticed a lot of sentences lately add the personal "a" before a noun referring to a person, but this sentence uses none. Why not?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dhyatt

"a" is used before the direct object, e.g. I see the man = Veo al hombre. The judge is not the direct object, you aren't eating the judge, you're eating with him, so you use "con"

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jack.erz

I looked up 'spanish personal a' on google (before I didn't even know what it meant) and apparently it is not used for 'indefinite people' because it doesn't matter in this case who the judge was, it could be any judge. So while I'm not sure if this is correct, it seems reasonable.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EugeneTiffany

Not bad.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mrylander

"Today I dine with the judge" was wrong. WHY?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Athalia2

"Como" means "eat," not "dine," which is "cenar."

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Emily4970

Is juez masculine or feminine or both?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Teg2016

Just out of curiosity, what is the past tense of eat in Spanish?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/THeNeeno

You'll have to be more specific.

Yo comí, comía, había comido, hubiera comido...

Tu comiste, comias, habías comido, hubieras comido...

El/ella/usted... Nosotros... Vosotros... Ellos...

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Chillyfish

aten. your welcome buddy.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SamuelOrr

I answered "Today I am eating with the judge" because it seems to me that would, in most contexts, be the correct translation. My answer was considered correct. Perhaps the contraction "I'm" is what caused BillOen's translation to be rejected, or perhaps in the alternative feedback is working ?!?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LingLingEst

today is a good day for me :)

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/yuliyulili

juez no se pronuncia con s,sino con z de toda la vida

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Funstondog

¿El juez? Lo siento.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JLW326

Sometimes the English translation they ask for is weird English. Isn't this supposed to go both ways? I would say, "Today I am eating with the judge." Bum ba bum! Incorrect!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rlinman

As well, spanish present indicative can express near future events as well. This sentence can also be correctly translated (in real world) as Today I will eat with the judge.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Majklo_Blic
Majklo_BlicPlus
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...Y luego, duermo con los peces.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Deanosaurio

Who uses juez for judge????????????? Dont you use juzgado?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/caiser
caiser
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Judge is juez, juzgado is judged or court.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/abhijeetk90

I eat with the referee is also correct in this

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/VanessaJ101
VanessaJ101
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Tomorrow you sleep with the fish!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FrancisOba6

with a judge I would use dine (not eat at McDonalds)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Tyler81403

Sounds like something Mr. Malfoy would say... more like Minister.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ChonScott1

It did not accept judge

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kennedy100503

It always says type what you hear and when i do i get it wrong because i miss a word that i cant either spell or pronounce

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
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That is exactly what you are learning. Luckily Spanish spelling and pronunciation is extremely consistent. If you understand how to pronounce Spanish sounds, you will find that there are only a few cases where it would even be possible to spell a word a different way. That makes Spanish a great language to reinforce your vocabulary by writing it.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RobertGlom

Sure does, hold them in contempt.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RobertGlom

I really couldn't quite make out the last word in the phrase.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SlayerPlays

That today is out of nowhere.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
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You must have tested out of some lessons. You learn ayer, hoy and mañana long before you learn el juez on Duo. Or are you saying that you didn't hear it well.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/fernandoramires

It marked my answer "Today I eat with the REFEREE" as wrong, for the word referee, but it says the juez can be either judge or referee (like in Portuguese).

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EugeneTiffany

It is easy to stumble in DL. And not your fault. Just a trip hazard in the path.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Snoue

voice feedback pronounced juez like ques.........sighs..........got me on that one

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NeoMoonGoddess

Got me too. DL introduced el juez at the beginning of the lesson; fast-forward 5 questions later and I'd forgotten that it'd been taught. I heard "quez" and was like, "Whhhat?!!!" LOL! Learning spanish is difficult if you have a bad memory.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Snoue

lool, same reaction here. But its all good tho

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Chillyfish

learn to look at the question plz.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Chillyfish

dont worry, it didnt get me because im smarter than that tiny walnut you call a brain. the level of dumb you produced through that so called "feedback" gave me multiple strains of cancer. go back to watching dora if you cant do spanish.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EugeneTiffany

Whoes dora?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Chillyfish

Your madre

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EugeneTiffany

Okay, if you say so. Not going to fence with you.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/VigorMortis

Seems like a good way to lower your sentence :D

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LEERICHA

Like a boss ;) eating with the judge!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ENGLISHSPE233225

What is one thing do we learn about the corruption?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/wemersonfelix

Hoy yo como con el juez

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/OMichaelMageo

Mabye they are food judges, and you are a judge too, so hoy como con el juez.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NitinJacob

It also says referee as a translation so my answer is not wrong

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Chillyfish

this is blasphemy. as a spanish professor i can confirm it means"theres a snake in ma boot". clearly it is a mistake. lingo pls

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tomoala

"I eat with the judge today" is not correct English.

6 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/michisjourdi
michisjourdi
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"Today, I'll eat with the judge." or "Today, I'm going to eat with the judge." would probably be more commonplace but "I eat with the judge today." is acceptable English grammar. Remember, we are learning to understand the Spanish. Most of us, I assume, already know English.

6 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/daweshillroad

It's actually very important that a site that aspires to be a translation site be very accurate with their translations. These are inaccurate. When we have to accept literal translations of Spanish that don't match common English usage we are doing the objectives of the site a disservice. How will they get translations right down the road when the simplest present tense sentences are translated awkwardly? It's not uncommon for one language to use a different tense to express the same idea. These are cases like that and Duolingo needs us to tell them that so they can improve their translations and accuracy. Language is about nuance. These exercises are not nuanced and sometimes they are just plain incorrect.

An example from another language: in Norwegian, when someone wants to say that they like something, they do not use the present tense, they use the past tense. Instead of saying "Det er god" (that is good) they say "Det VAR god" (that WAS good). Duolingo is missing this kind of nuance, the specific variations that define the language.

6 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/froaz
froaz
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Yes, it should definitely allow for many variations that would be common in english to be accepted. With the "my answer should have been accepted" feedback button, over time I am sure this will iron itself out.

However, in this case there is nothing wrong with that translation as long as the others are accepted. People say sentences like this all the time. "Today I see my doctor." "Tonight I dine on turtle soup."

Also keep in mind that when you first learn a language, you are typically stuck in the present tense for a while building vocabulary and learning the basics of sentence structure etc. As such, you tend to create sentences and phrases that might not be as common. As you move on to more advanced verb tenses, you gain the nuance you are looking for. This isn't a problem with duolingo, just a reality of learning a language. You can't get used to translating one tense into a different tense because it sounds better in English. If you do, you'll learn to choose the wrong tenses when constructing your own thoughts and sentences in Spanish.

This progression is exactly how you learn in a classroom or from a text book. In reality, if you encountered this sentence, it would probably be in a different tense or a double verb like "voy a comer con el juez." We'll get there. If you notice in the real world translation sentences, this type of thing is only in the exercises while we have the training wheels on.

6 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/daweshillroad

This is a very good answer except for one thing: as I understand duolingo's goals, they aren't just to teach us Spanish. If they were, I would agree with you, but the goals here are to create a world wide translation site, which means that the translations need to work BOTH WAYS. I can honestly say I have never heard an English speaker say "Today I see my doctor". I HAVE however heard NON english speakers say this, which supports my point. If duolingo wants to develop accurate translations, they have to be accurate in both of the languages being used: english to spanish and spanish to english. Otherwise we end up with pidgin English/Spanish.

6 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EugeneTiffany

Translation site? How do you figure that? I have seen no means to trasnslate anything.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/michisjourdi
michisjourdi
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mgoatgibbs, that is an excellent point and very well worded!

6 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EugeneTiffany

In my view we should be learning in the past tense. And not the present tense. Conversations occure largely in the past tense (like in talking about what my dog did), and very little in the present tense. In learning in the past tense we could begin conversing with each other right off in Spanish. But this present tense knowledge is virtually useless.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/2ndshift

Isn't Duolingo using our translations of the web articles as the real objective of this website? I thought the lessons were simply a way to draw in a pool of volunteers for that task, but are not themselves actual web content being translated or in any way utilised by Duolingo for that purpose, except that as we all learn more Spanish we become better translators of the articles.

I am confused also by which translation approach you would prefer, "...common English usage..." or "Language is about nuance." It seems to be a contradiction. Should 't we--as beginners--stick to as close a transliteration as possible that still makes sense in translation. Nothing common, nothing fancy, just accurate. Certainly "Today I eat with the judge." is all that.

Finally, I think many people translate as if the sentence is to be spoken only, never considering the written page. In any language, spoken versus written can be very different in construction, formality, and vocabulary.

6 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/michisjourdi
michisjourdi
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You make an excellent point.

6 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/daweshillroad

Yes, this is getting frustrating. English speakers would say "today I'm eating with the judge" or "I'm eating with the judge today". It wouldn't be frustrating if the bad english grammar in the answers didn't make english speakers have to re-do exercises but this is happening with increasing frequency.

6 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/caiser
caiser
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I talk Spanish and I don't understand why that sentence is not correct English. Thinking a bit, perhaps because you say "I will be eating with the judge today"

6 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pingu632

"Today I eat with the judge" is proper English, just not very common. It would answer the question "With whom do you eat today?"

6 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/daweshillroad

Essential for duolingo to at least allow for a more common correct english answer. This english translation is really just a literal translation from spanish.

6 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Athalia2

pingu632 and michisjourdi are correct: the adverb "today" may appear at the beginning or end of the sentence it modifies. In the Midwestern U.S., at least, both locations sound normal. Note, however, that the part that comes first--the activity or the day--may indicate which one the speaker feels is most important.

For example, when I announce my plans for the day, I often start with "Today..." Yet, when I focus on the activity--especially if it concerns or excites me--I am more likely to state the activity first and end with "today." Thus, if I scheduled a tune-up at the mechanic's shop some time ago, I'm more likely to say, "Today I need to take my car to the mechanic." If my car has broken down, though, I'm more likely to say, "I need to take my car to the mechanic today." Do you see the slight difference in emphasis? The second version emphasizes the need for a mechanic more than the first did. However, the difference is so small that, in both situations, I could place "today" at the other end of the sentence, and most English-speakers would still consider it correct.

(This note about placement also applies to other adverbs and adverbial phrases related to time: "tomorrow," "in the morning," "later tonight," "next Thursday," and so on.)

5 years ago
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