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"Une petite émotion ?"

Translation:A slight emotion?

5 years ago

76 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/SuzanneNussbaum

A small emotion is meaningless in English; I would be happy to be told what the phrase means in French. (Is someone being teased about something, for example?)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jytou
jytou
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You would definitely say that after someone went over some little shock, excitement or fright.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Martyn731976
Martyn731976
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In English-English? I don't think so, Sir.

3 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mrbennet
mrbennet
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No, in French-French.

3 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Tanksalot

"A small fright " makes more sense than " A small feeling".

" A small feeling" is like saying "a little pregnant" or is anger a smaller feeling than shame?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/oyttb
oyttb
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A small feeling could refer to having a small feeling OF something, eg: "I get a small feeling of dread in the back of my mind every time I walk into that old house". I think it is perfectly sensible to say "a little pregnant" too, for example when describing someone's appearance: "Have you seen Elizabeth? She underwent IVF treatments and is now starting to look a little pregnant! I think the IVF worked!". Same goes with "very pregnant" and other such qualifiers: "My cat looks VERY pregnant, I think she will give birth any day now".

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LeValley1

Yes. But the key thing is that there's an OF after it. We would never just say: A small feeling. We would say A small feeling of SOMETHING (usually fear, dread, embarassment, shyness). Almost never a "small feeling of rage or a small feeling of love).

"A little pregnant" is a cutesy colloquialism that works in English because it is a kind of joke (sort of like what we're asked to learn in the Flirtation section).

At any rate, when translating (from or to English), an example like "a little pregnant" would mislead a language learner, just as this phrase does.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/oyttb
oyttb
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The "of" can be implied by the context. For example, imagine two people go into a shady neighborhood at night as they're walking home. One person might say "I have a bad feeling about this place", and the other one might look for some reassurance in asking "a small feeling?", in an attempt to gauge the first person's level of confidence that something bad might happen.

Another way this could be uttered is in terms of sensation. I can easily imagine a doctor doing a touch test on a person's foot in order to gauge whether their nerves are functioning correctly:

Doc: "do you feel anything here?" Patient: "no, nothing" Doc: "how about here?" Patient: "Yeah, I got a small feeling that time".

You might argue that the word "feeling" is not being used "properly" here (to be honest, I'm not entirely sure myself), but the point is that English speakers could easily utter that sentence. Much of what people say in real life isn't exactly "proper" or "correct" by certain standards, whether that's because they don't realize it's "proper" or because they were speaking off the cuff. In order to communicate in any language, you have to be able to understand how people actually use the language and not just how one particular group of people arbitrarily believe language should ideally be used. I think being exposed to phrases like "a little pregnant" or "I am an apple" is actually really important when learning a new language. It's very easy to get caught up in your own biases and start hearing what you think people SHOULD have meant instead of hearing what people are ACTUALLY saying, and that can lead to misunderstanding and confusion. Using unusual or uncommon phrases forces you to actually learn what the words mean instead of relying on preconceived notions or on imposing your own meaning on what is actually there.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Shaphee

"In order to communicate in any language, you have to be able to understand how people actually use the language and not just how one particular group of people arbitrarily believe language should ideally be used". <- gold!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JanetBerry2

As a sentence grab with no context it is not an English expression

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/effyleven
effyleven
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I agree. As it stands this phrase is pretty much without any real meaing in English. The course would be better without it...

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CJTilzey
CJTilzeyPlus
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I might say "a little feeling" in the doctor's office scenario, but I'd never say "a small feeling." Small and feeling just aren't collocated in English without something to follow.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ieXEZn2E

Yes oyttb, that all makes sense, but the important factor you are missing is when would a French person say this (if at all) - I am not trying to learn odd English phrases I need to know when I would need to say this to a French person and what they would understand it to mean. Even if I use it in the doctor patient scenario you suggest would the native French speaker think that sounded natural or would they understand what I meant but put my blunder down to being a non native speaker?

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jytou
jytou
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There are many scenarios where such a sentence could be uttered. You've just learned or lived something that could trigger some emotion.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/effyleven
effyleven
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Comment: "I have a bad feeling about this place." Natural response: "Really? How bad?"

3 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CJ.Dennis
CJ.Dennis
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The two of you are talking at cross purposes. One of you is right when talking about extremely formal "proper" English, the other is right when talking about informal day-to-day English. Until you agree what you're talking about, you'll continue to disagree about how it works.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Bill-Roca

I also had "a small fright" but it is marked wrong, even though 'fright' is one of the 2 drop down options. Reported.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DianaM

Folks, really, you need to stop believing those drop-down things. My dictionary puts "fright" at the end of a long list of more obvious translations for "émotion", additionally marking it "(negative)". I suspect the conditions under which one might use "émotion" to mean "fright" are very restricted.

Can a Francophone enlighten us here as to when "émotion" might mean "fright"?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LeValley1

Yes, but when we're confused because our other knowledge/general experience of French leads to "a small feeling," or "a small emotion" or "a little emotion", none of which make sense by themselves (unlike sentences that give context), then we tend to use the drop downs.

I just puzzled over this one. "A small feeling" is often translated, in English, as "a hunch" or "an intuition." I can count on one hand (minus four fingers or more) the number of times I have heard anyone in writing or out loud say they have a "A small feeling" or even "A little feeling."

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mrbennet
mrbennet
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The problem is, this is basically a French idiom that just isn't used at all in English, so there is no straightforward translation of it. 'Une petite émotion' could be a fright, a moment of anxiety (probably the most common usage in my experience) or even surprise, or it could be the feeling you get when you see something really moving and get a bit choked up. We don't have a nice catch-all phrase for these things in English. (I'm a native speaker of both, BTW.)

So this phrase is terrible for a translation exercise, but great for learning that semantic space can be very different between languages.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ieXEZn2E

Oh mrbennet! Thank you for that information. Now I can simply reply "a slight emotion" and move on, I will probably not utter those words but if a French person ever says them to me I will know I heard right

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Wanda655505

Well, we have a saying in my neck of the woods in the US. One usually says it when s/he comes away from a situation that made him/her feel uneasy, or bad and or confused, but definately not good. You can't quite put your finger on how it made you feel, you just know it was somewhat negative and you didn't like it, but you don't know why. It is, "that made me feel some sort of way," or "that made me feel some kind of way." It a little more than having a "sense" of something.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Iflana

Agreed. And emotion/feeling is a general term, where as fright is a very specific one. Others have mentioned many specific emotions, and I think they have other words in French do they not?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mrbennet
mrbennet
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I think this is exactly the sort of context where it could mean 'fright'. As in, 'did you get a little fright?'

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/OliviaScot4

Yet again the text cannot be litteraly translated into English, and the drop down suggestions were even more miss leading!!!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LeValley1

Thanks for reporting. Have a Lingot. I mean, seriously, for an English speaker that's the only possible (normal) answer.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Transitioning

I agree. It makes more sense to translate it as "A vague feeling".

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LeValley1

You are correct, that absent TONS of context, no one would say this in English. Maybe a song writer. No one else.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Carina90

I answered "a little emotion?" and got it correct. After Quelle horreur and Quelle émotion, all I could see was a theater teacher trying to work with a student. Something similar to "show me a little emotion"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KATEJ15

A little emotion going on here!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SeanMeaneyPL
SeanMeaneyPL
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The possible English translations given throughout the thread are all more-or-less contrived to try to make sense of something that can't really be made sense of. English speakers just don't say, "a slight emotion" and no amount of twisting will make it a sensible phrase to English ears. The nearest you'll get is (possibly) a bit emotional, a bit nervous, a bit jumpy, rather jolly - you would have to change the adjective to suit the situation. French perhaps has the advantage here. Although French can get by with a simple n'est-ce pas? just think of the contortions English has to go though to express this tag question. Isn't it? aren't you? didn't she? couldn't they? shan't we? - ad infinitum. A slight emotion here or there would be a relief. If we could feel one.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mrbennet
mrbennet
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Innit.

(By which I mean I wholeheartedly agree with your comment.)

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BJTEACH

The suggestion in vocabulary definition was fright and emotion. A small emotion is not a very good translation.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hornplyr
hornplyrPlus
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How does one define a small emotion? Is it one of those ennui-associated things where nothing really matters? :-)

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jrikhal
jrikhal
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In this case I understand the French sentence as a little fright?, without context.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SuzanneNussbaum

Maybe "a little excitement," "a little thrill," which make more sense than "a little / small feeling / emotion." My old dictionary says Parler avec émotion means "to speak feelingly," and that Ressentir une vive émotion is "to be greatly moved" or "to be thrilled."

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nictheman
nictheman
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I just had a male voice for the first time ever. Anybody else experience this?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/007woofwoof

My cousin , Jean Jacques!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lokaltmonster

What does this mean in practice?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jan515759

I do wish dl would explain some of these very odd phrases...where would you hear such an expression? If the translation is obviously not ever used in english (this course is for anglophones after all) then use another phrase or, if it is a common french one, explain it a little for us. .Thanks

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Wanda655505

To them, the phrases are not odd, and perhaps they don't know all that is odd to us.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Cynthia160

I so agree. I enjoy Duolingo, but there are several phrases that when translated into English, don't make much sense.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Gomer_Pyle
Gomer_Pyle
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Sounds like something Kirk would say when Spock is showing his human side.

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JohnEd38
JohnEd38
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Suggestion: put this question in "idioms" and discuss it as long as you like. I know what you're trying to say, but the translation(s) are too argumentative.

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RICHARDBER583347
RICHARDBER583347
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"A little feeling" was not accepted. My thinking was along the lines of something like an acting direction: "Say it with a little feeling". Even the DL translation offers "feeling" as a possibility. What was the problem? Is this a "faux ami"?

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Marguerite496140

a little feeling means something in English as someone who has some sensitivity about an issue or towards another.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tani17
tani17
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is "emotion" always negative? In English love and joy are emotions as well as fear.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Hokusai_1
Hokusai_1
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My answer was"A little bit emotional?" , I don't know if one can say this in English, I am from Belgium, anyway tonight is a soccer match and I have really "a small feeling". Belgium-Italie, Belgique, le meilleur, VIVA les diables rouges! à demain.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Randonneur3
Randonneur3
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'A (little) bit emotional' is certainly the common English phrase, and perhaps the best translation. But not for Duo.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PeriMaison

It's a big help going through Duo long after most of these commenters. The idioms and drop down translations seem a lot better now than they were. But this one is really awkward to translate. I have gotten used to making up scenarios to provide context for some of these phrases but "a small feeling" really requires a lot of twisting.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LesAussi

Surely "A slight feeling?" should be acceptable!

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RosemarySp
RosemarySp
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Why is “a small feeling” not correct?

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Martyn731976
Martyn731976
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Is this actually translatable and in such a simplistic manner?

3 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/galais

why not "thrill"

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/n6zs
n6zs
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Larousse suggests that the plural "les émotions" refers to "fright." I don't know if the singular form is used that way. http://www.larousse.com/en/dictionaries/french-english/%C3%A9motion/28701?q=emotion

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ariaflame
AriaflamePlus
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Actually they suggest that it's des émotions that indicates fright. It was des in all the examples, and it wasn't suggested as a fright in the singular at all.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Janus8536
Janus8536
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Would 'A petty emotion' also be correct?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/brock_keller
brock_keller
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Why is this not "Une petite d'emotion? would that be referring to amount instead of size? In that case would the sentence be "Un peu d'emotion?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/chinjanja
chinjanja
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a little feeling makes sense. Small is usually quantifiable

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LeQuangHoang

anyone has the idea of "a light emotion" ?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/daughterofAlbion
daughterofAlbion
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Is this what you would ask someone who seems a bit upset?
i.e. is it equivalent to: "Are you feeling a bit emotional?"

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Callidryas

Would this be roughly the equivalent of the (very idiomatic) English expression, "Having a moment?" (Which is a way of asking if some -- undefined -- emotion or feeling is distracting you, currently.)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/stefanovic123

This is a useless phrase

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Danielle562695

Context?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CJTilzey
CJTilzeyPlus
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Here's a link to Oxford's collocation dictionary, and you'll see therein that "small" isn't found with "emotion." http://oxforddictionary.so8848.com/search?word=emotion

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CJTilzey
CJTilzeyPlus
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1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HaroldWonh
HaroldWonh
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This is totally meaningless!

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PhilMacK

There are contexts in which one would say in English that someone showed little emotion, or little feeling. “He showed little emotion when he heard the awful news.” Is this a similar idea here?

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mrbennet
mrbennet
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No, that would be 'peu d'émotion', with the connotation that it's less emotion than would normally be expected. This doesn't have that negative connotation.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PhilMacK

I suspected as much. Thanks for the clarification.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/amharris1962

"A small feeling" was not accepted. Why not?

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jytou
jytou
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Although it is not as simple as that in real life with context, Duo seems to stick with:

“feeling” = « sentiment » (or « sensation » if it's physical)

“emotion” = « émotion »

It does make sense though as these strongly correlate in general.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/effyleven
effyleven
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I agree. "A slight emotion," means nothing in English. Which leaves us wondering what it might mean in French.. ?

3 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/effyleven
effyleven
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Is ".. slight feeling" accepted" ?? It is in the hints.

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/effyleven
effyleven
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"I have a slight feeling." "Really? How slight do you feel? I have lost some weight myself, just lately."

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/effyleven
effyleven
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I just tried "A little feeling." No go, I'm afraid.. This one is hopeless, and not likely to be corrected because all complaints are ignored..

Never mind. The best thing to do is to move on. Just put, "A slight emotion" every time it comes up, and ignore the fact it is without any real meaning in English.

1 week ago