"Jag vill bada."

Translation:I want to swim.

March 28, 2015

22 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/jerrethMobil

So Bada can mean Swim and Bathe but Simma can only mean Swim right? Is there a certain reason or circumstance to use Bada for Swim instead of Simma

March 28, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Zmrzlina

Yes, that is right.

Bada means to be in the water, be it in a pool or the sea.

Simma is to propel oneself through the water.

All swimmers bathe, but not not all bathers swim.

March 28, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/P-Funkel

Wow, that really cleared things up; have another Lingot!

February 9, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/ishouldbesolucke

I think it might be my imagination, but when I played "bada" by itself, the TTS sounded like it was saying "bäda". But when I played the whole sentence, it sounded like "bada".

December 9, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/AnCatDubh

Not your imagination. I heard it too.

December 16, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Zmrzlina

As do I. That is really strange. Shouldn't be that way.

December 16, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/bex42

Me too. It sounds like that when I play it slowly, but normal if I play it at full speed.

December 22, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/SCMT1089

+1

April 16, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Stallya

It's like French "se baigner" :)

March 24, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Zmrzlina

Oui, c'est une bonne comparaison. Bada = baigner, mais simma = nager.

March 24, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Stallya

Nice French!

March 24, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Zmrzlina

Hopefully I got it right. :p

March 24, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Stallya

Yup, can confirm :)

March 25, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/leemonday

so is this used for to take a shower?

June 11, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/devalanteriel

Nope, that's duscha. And for taking a bath in a bathtub, it's more common to say ta ett bad rather than bada, although both are just as correct.

June 23, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Fergal_

Yet, "I want to bath" is not a correct answer. Any reason why?

August 24, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/devalanteriel

"bath" as a verb is transitive and means to wash somebody in a bath. But for other senses, like the one here, the verb is "bathe", which we do accept. We also accept "I wasnt to take/have a bath".

August 24, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Fergal_

Ha! Thanks! I did not know that! I thought "to bath" could be intransitive, meaning "to have/take a bath", as opposed to "to bathe" meaning "to put oneself into water" (for recreational purpose). Could it be a BE/AE difference? (note: I'm not a native english speaker)

August 25, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/devalanteriel

No, I don't think it is - but I do know that quite a lot of natives make the same mistake. It wouldn't surprise me if the word eventually changed spelling. :)

August 25, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Segwyne

After learning the difference between simma and bada, I translated this as "I want to go swimming", which sounds to me closer to what is intended. In New England, if one wants to swim, they are wanting to practice laps in the pool or something like that. If we want to hang out at the beach, we want to go swimming. Writing it out makes it sound kind of weird. My kids never want to swim, but they always want to go swimming.

June 14, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/devalanteriel

I agree, this is a bit tricky... Swedish also uses jag vill gå/åka och bada, and to some extent, this is preferable to just jag vill bada. Then again, both are certainly in use. I'll add "I want to go swimming", but I'm not overly happy with the pedagogics of it. :)

June 14, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/Segwyne

I totally understand. I suppose it is somewhat of an idiomatic difference. Thank you.

June 14, 2019
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