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  5. "Altmışın yarısı otuz."

"Altmışın yarısı otuz."

Translation:Half of sixty is thirty.

March 28, 2015

22 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hikaroto

I wrote "The half of sixty is thirty" why is it wrong!?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/edurup

Same question.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Todd940413

Probably just because "the half of [something]" is a pretty rare construction in English. "Half" is more often used without the definite article. (There is the expression "You don't know the half of it," used to express consternation or amazement at some situation that the speaker may then go on to describe animatedly.) I really can't think of many other cases where the expression "half of" has "the" before it. ("We gave them half of the melon" is a typical use.) But the story is different if an adjective like "first" or "second" precedes "half"; it's very common to hear "the first half of the game," "the second half of the movie," etc. Sorry if too much information!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DarcX

That was a hard one to translate. I like the construction of "sixty's half" though! :D


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/YK777

Thirty is the half of sixty... why wrong?!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Youssef.tsun

Altmış = 60, altmış(ın) yarisi = half of 60.

Precisely: sixty's half. Deal with the suffix -ın as 's If am not wrong...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gabejosh

I translated "Altmışın yarısı otuz." as "the half of sixty is thirty" and was marked wrong. How would that be in Turkish then?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Laulea149

I had the same and it was marked wrong..


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OlavSurlan

Probably the "the" in front is wrong. Even though I am not a native English speaker, "the half of sixty" SOUNDS wrong, "half of sixty" SOUNDS right. Just imagine your math teacher asking the students questions: "What is two thirds of sixty?", "What is three times sixty?", "What is half of sixty?" Sounds right.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BenShaw49503

I am a native English speaker and can confirm that it is not correct to say "the half of sixty is thirty". Sorry I can't give you an exact answer as to why! Maybe because half of sixty will ALWAYS be thirty so there is no need for an article.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PianoMasterGueri

Duolingo doesn't allow you to say 'the'.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/joklomo

Could someone might explain this? Is this because it is possessive?

Sixty (possessor > genitive case -(n)in), half (posses sees) =it > - (s)i??

What is nomative case of yarisi , yarim?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shahrazad26

Why did the m of yarim disappear?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SedatKlc

yarım is usually used as an adjective and yarı is both as an adjective and noun. so yarı is used in this case. and it takes possesive suffix ı with buffer s


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shamshoomi

Why is "sixty's half is thirty" not accepted? It is the closest translation to the Turkish sentence!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Todd940413

True, but it's really not very idiomatic English. "Half of [X] is [X/2]" is just the way it's normally said in English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Polishlear17

Is there a difference between 'yarım' and 'yarı' or are they synonyms? Can we say 'almışın yarımı'?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BronwenJon6

There's something wrong with the listening exercise, it's incredibly difficult to get it to recognise "Altmışın."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SonoZara

Altmış => 60 Altmış+ın (possessive ending) Yarı=> half Yarı+sı (possessive ending) Altmışın yarısı => half of sixty Otuzun yarısı => half of thirty Yetmişi yarısı otuz beş => half of 70 is 35


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sergeks2

Why not " thirty is a half ...etc"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lassi492061

What is the etymology of the Turkish words for 20, 30, 40, and 50? It seems odd as they do not resemble the words for 2, 3, 4, and 5.

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