"Çoğunluküçmilyon."

Translation:The majority is three million.

3 years ago

20 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Janos
Janos
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what is this supposed to mean?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kensax

I agree. The sentence makes no sense to me in English.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AlexinNotTurkey
AlexinNotTurkey
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It is perfect English. There is a majority and that majority consists of three million people. :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kensax

Sorry, it still makes no semantic sense. It's equivalent to saying "more than 50% is three million" ;) "Majority" is a range of fractions, not a number. "Three million is a majority" would make sense. Or "Three million voted aye, which is the majority of voters". Or, at a stretch, "The majority is more than three million" (but that sounds a bit odd to say). It may be ok in informal, spoken language, but not as an independent clause in formal writing.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AlexinNotTurkey
AlexinNotTurkey
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Ah, we may have found a difference in some people' Englishes. As long as you have some context salient group (let's say the US Senate), you can refer to the majority of that group as "the majority." In this case, the majority is fifty-one.

Basically, in my English, there are lot of things that can be understood underlyingly here. Turkish behaves the same. I would have never thought that people may differ here :D

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/johaquila
johaquila
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Yup. I think in the best case that's a specifically American English colloquial usage that resulted from a specific style of media reporting related to thresholds required to pass laws in Senate and Congress.

As a speaker of British English I was totally puzzled at first, even after your first explanation. Note that everything would have been clear to me given the appropriate context, as in "The majority is sixty-one seats".

The underlying issue here is a mathematical one, and I am not even sure it's correct in American English, either. The majority of something is primarily not a discrete number but a range. By way of normal linguistic extension, in appropriate contexts the majority of a discrete set can be identified with its smallest value (e.g. 61 of 120 seats). However, once you start counting large populations, they cannot be treated as discrete. "The majority is three million" would mean that 3,000,000 counts as a majority but 2,999,999 doesn't. This is so unlikely that even in the event that someone technically/legally defines a majority in this way, they would use more precise language such as "The majority is defined as three million."

(In case you don't see why: If you are not actually speaking about the majority to this level precision, then use of the word majority would be blocked by the applicability of the word half.)

I cannot comment on the Turkish sentence, but I suspect it has similar issues.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vvsey
vvsey
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Here's another context. The majority of viewers likes the show. How many people is that? Currently, the majority is three million people.

Anyway, there is an error up there, the translation should say million, not millions

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lisa4duolingo
lisa4duolingo
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In formal writing, I don't think you would just write "The majority is three million," but a New York businessman interested in doing some advertising, might ask an advertising executive something like, "What is the average price for a Times Square billboard?" The answer might be, "The majority (of them) are 3 million (dollars)."

Still, an ad exec would probably answer back with "average" rather than "majority" in such a situation but both work. In the example I gave, I think all native speakers would understand both the question and the answer with ease, but the answer is a bit deficient due to word choice. It isn't precise because what we're really saying here is that "The majority (of them)(cost) 3 million (dollars). A bit of an odd scenario, I realize, but my knowledge of majorities equating to 3 million is a bit limited. If nothing else, I hope this helped.

I also came upon a web page from someone's grammar blog that explains things in a pretty clear and straightforward way. The link to it is below:

Majority Rules

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/londoncallling

But does that mean that 3 million people are in the majority group? Or that there are 3 million more people in the majority group than in the minority group? This sentence is not a natural way of expressing either fact, at least where I'm from.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/macellan

As a native Turkish speaker I failed this one. It does not make sense to me.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Babevski
Babevski
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Can it be "Majority of three million"?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Simon427206

sounds better to me

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Siobhan009
Siobhan009
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Just to say that I don't have a problem with the English here. I understood this translation as the equivalent of "there is a majority and that majority is three million strong". In other words, there's been an election/vote etc and the winning side have three million more votes than the losing side. I'm a native speaker of English from Britain.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/johaquila
johaquila
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That precise meaning would never have occurred to me, and I actually worked for British university once as a mathematician. For me the sentence barely makes sense, but to the extent that it does I agree with AlexNotInTurkey's earlier interpretation, which is totally different from yours.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Siobhan009
Siobhan009
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I'm no good at maths myself (I wish I were), being a language teacher and translator, but in the political context, which is how I interpreted it, the meaning of the English version would be as I said above. (In fact, that is how I understood AlexNotInTurkey's interpretation too.) For example, if there's an election with 8 million voters, and 3 million vote for Party X and 5 million vote for Party Y, then Party Y have a 2 million majority/there's a 2 million majority/a majority of 2 million etc. The majority in this context is the difference between the two numbers, not the total. In Parliament, the current British Government has a majority of 12, or a 12-seat majority, because the governing party has 12 more MPs than all the other MPs put together. Of course there's also the simple majority, which is 50%+1, but the majority as expressed in politics in terms of numbers of voters or seats is as I've described. Having said that, I absolutely recognise that this may not be what the Turkish phrase means, as my Turkish is not good enough (in fact, nowhere good enough) for me to tell. I'm only explaining how I interpreted the English translation, and why.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/johaquila
johaquila
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In your example, I can actually agree with saying there is a 2 million majority, but I cannot agree with saying the majority is 2 million. Because the 2 million majority in your example is actually 5 million. (And the minority is 3 million.) Obviously there are some very subtle nuances at play here.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Siobhan009
Siobhan009
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I think the reason for the confusion is the two different interpretations of majority - the mathematical and the political. For example, if there are 650 MPs in the House of Commons, and 350 of them belong to Party X, and 300 belong to Party Y, then we'd say that Party X has a majority of 50. We wouldn't say that the majority is 350 and the minority is 300.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Siobhan009
Siobhan009
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Dear Johaquila, I've run out of indentations, so I'll reply here. There is a fundamental difference between the use of the word "majority" in maths, and in politics. If you look here: http://www.thefreedictionary.com/majority you will, I hope, see that the political use is as I've described. Seriously. I understand your mathematical stance, and I agree about the use of majority in maths. But words can mean different things in different contexts. Here, as I've said, as a native speaker of English, I have no problem with the original sentence. I hope you are happy with the definition as given in the dictionary above. If not, then we'll just have to agree to disagree.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/johaquila
johaquila
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Again, in this situation I have no problem with "a majority of 50" or a "50 seat majority". But in this situation the abstract majority is 326 MPs and if it makes any sense at all to say that the concrete majority is a number, then IMO it would have to be "the majority is 350".

In most situations these different ways of saying it are essentially equivalent and can just be transformed into each other. Whether you call a group "a group of 50", "a 50-strong group" or say "the group is 50 people" - it always amounts to the same hard information. But with "majority" rather than "group" it's not at all the same thing. In "a majority of N seats" the thinking about margins is dominant; in "the majority is N seats" the thinking about absolute sizes is dominant.

Of course not everyone will get this right all the time, so talking about majorities in one of these ways is inherently ambiguous and one must also check with the context which reading actually makes sense. But this requires background information such as the total number of seats in a parliament.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/khodja.imane

The pronunciation wasn't correct ,i didn't understand

1 year ago
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