https://www.duolingo.com/ibekee

Turkish is REALLY cool

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It reminds me of studying Japanese in that most words are unfamiliar, SOV word order (which I think is really fun) and the pieces that stick together to make words. I am having a blast learning it, so far. I've heard folks say how difficult it is, so I'm up for the challenge.

Questions:
1. The pronunciation of "i," is it pronounced as an "i" as in Spanish or in between an English "i" as in igloo and a Spanish "i?" 2. Are there any silent sounds or letters when speaking Turkish? In normal speech, does one always pronounce each sound - even the endings? In Japanese, I learned to stop saying the "u" at the end of a word ending with "su," as in Desu.
3. Is there a typical pattern to syllable stresses in Turkish? Would one know how to correctly pronounce a word with the correct inflection just by seeing the word?

Thanks Turkish Gurus. And thanks Duo, as I probably would have never learned a word of Turkish without you!

3 years ago

13 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Ektoraskan

Hello!

  1. I would say it's just like the Spanish i.

  2. Yes, the ğ is silent. And there is an unofficial vowel reduction. People don't pronounce every suffix in its full. "Yapacağım" being pronounced as "yapıcam" and things like that. You will learn them in time.

  3. Pretty much, yes. 90% of the time, the last syllable is stressed. Proper nouns are exceptions to this rule. Also, The negative suffix -me and the present continuous suffix -yor shift the stress to the syllable before them. Suffixes for the verb to be are never stressed. I think that's about it.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ibekee
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Cool. Thanks for the tips.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Hojinkie
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My grandparents are from Maraş and they pronounce ğ as a Greek γ or IPA /ɣ/. I'm guessing that's part of the dialect there.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Selcen_Ozturk
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interesting, but very possible. There are many dialects in Turkey

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/0rangeorchid
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i is a long eeeee sound (like the English name of the letter "e") ı makes an "uh" sound

There are some very frequently used words in Turkish which are squished to be, well, lazy, in everyday speech, but other than that they are all pronounced. and very phonetically at that. It's a wonderfully easy language to read.

people may tell you ğ is silent but it really isnt, it's just soft, like its name says. some people pronounce it more than others. If you've ever studied arabic ot comes from the "gyn" sound, and sounds a bit like a cat purring, extending the two vowels on either side of it into each other.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Taloua
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Yes, you are quite right.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ektoraskan

Well, for me, ğ is completely silent. For example, I pronounce the words "boğa" and "boa (yılanı)" exactly the same way.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/0rangeorchid
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In many words it is silent, but not always I think. For example I can definitely hear it in the word bağdat, which is obviously a leftover from arabic where it actually was the gyn - baghdad

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ektoraskan

Personally, I pronounce Bağdat as /Baadat/.

Actually, here's a recording of my own voice: http://vocaroo.com/i/s09JBFhivw9U

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ArcoIrisRehacer

Merhaba! :D 1. I'd say that yeah, it's kinda like the spanish 'i'. It's basically ee but shorter 2. As ektoraskan said, ğ is silent, and there is unofficial vowel reduction. However, vowel reduction usually only applies in informal situations. That might sound confusing, but you'll get it over time. You wouldn't say 'gonna' at a formal business dinner or something, right? it's kinda like that 3. i can't think of anything other than what ektoraskan said

hope this helps :D

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AdrianD85

I was always told by my Turkish friends that the ğ would, instead of being pronounced, lengthen the vowel that precedes it. So, you would give a little more length and emphasis to said vowel. Is this true?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ektoraskan

Yes, but that only works if ğ is followed by a consonant or it's the last letter of the word. For example:

dağ (mountain) is pronounced /daa/ thanks to the ğ.

yağmalama (pillaging) is pronounced /yaamalama/ thanks to the ğ.

However, if the ğ is between two vowels, it serves no such purpose and it's completely mute:

Doğan (falcon) is pronounced /doan/. The ğ has no effect. It's completely silent.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AdrianD85

That is the best explanation I have seen. Thank you. Makes so much sense. I appreciate you, Ektoraskan! :)

3 years ago
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