"Who are you waiting for?"

Translation:Vem väntar ni på?

March 30, 2015

17 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jerobarraco

why is för not accepted?

July 2, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zmrzlina

In Swedish, the preposition with waiting is .

July 2, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jerobarraco

tack, i have a lot of problems with på. (though most are related to me not being native english speaker and mixing in and on)

July 2, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zmrzlina

Prepositions are very tricky in translating from one language to the other. You'll get the hang of it with enough time and practice. :)

July 2, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jerobarraco

Thanks again, and for the motivation; and for all your contributions to the answers, they are very informative.

July 3, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/xolove24xo

Why would you use ni and på in this sentence

March 30, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/devalanteriel

Same thing as in the other thread, please see that answer: https://www.duolingo.com/comment/7824458

March 30, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lbodle

Technically the correct English sentence is "For whom are you waiting?", although few would say it that way. In Swedish can you not put the particle at the beginning, the way we would (should) put the preposition before it's object in English? I wrote "Pa* vem vantar du?" It was counted wrong.

*(I know there should be accents, but I can't find them here.)

May 16, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/devalanteriel

I don't really subscribe to the notion that not putting prepositions last is somehow more "technically correct", but yes - you can put it there. It's not usually idiomatic, though, and it's a construction we avoid in the course, since it can be a little too advanced for the scope.

May 16, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lbodle

Thanks! English is ridiculous in that (among other reasons) during the Norman Conquest French rules (such as not ending a sentence with a preposition) were imposed on a Germanic language with verbs that include prepositions. (My favorite example is "Those are the shoes upon which George Bush threw." Remember that little Japanese relations faux pas?) It makes no sense at all, but that's British history.

The Duolingo lesson I read on particle verbs seems like the same thing as the German. I know that in romance languages the preposition rule is firm. Brits seem to use the structure routinely, but here in the U.S. it's common to ignore it, so much so that I've heard language students discussing whether or not the word 'whom' is obsolete. It's not. A 4-year-old native English speaker in rural Kansas asked me "For whom are you making it?" It especially sets my teeth on edge when people attach superfluous prepositions to the end of questions that don't need them. Case in point: 'where are you going to' instead of plain old 'where are you going'.

That's enough of my rant.

My familiarity with Swedish is minimal, and I'm left with two questions. First, is my Swedish sentence correct? (I wasn't sure if you mean that the construction is not used in the course in English, in Swedish, or both. I've seen it used in the Italian, French, and Spanish courses.) If so, is it commonly used in the written and/or spoken language? I guess what I really want to know is whether or not people in Sweden would still look at me weird if I use it in speaking. Sometimes people here do that, even though the English I use is the only language I knew until I was old enough to ride my bike around town by myself, and I learned it in regular midwestern public schools and at home from working class native English speakers. Thankfully, in school I was spared the example of the kindergarten teacher who - while leading a meeting - said "I could of went." Ouch.

Sorry for the verbiage. It's late and my filters are weak!

May 17, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/devalanteriel

Sorry for the verbiage. It's late and my filters are weak!

No worries. :)

Your sentence is correct, minus the diacritics - it's just not a very idiomatic construction in Swedish, and it's not common (though neither is it rare).

Hence, we tend to not use it in the course regardless of language. We're a lot stricter in the Swedish the course than in most other courses when it comes to sentence construction, since we're trying to actively teach how to phrase things in Swedish. Because of this, prepositional phrases might be accepted if moved a little, but not generally allowed to rewrite the entire thing. The argument is that we think it's easier for people to learn the appropriate Swedish constructions if we're a bit stricter with how they correlate to English.

Obviously, there are pros and cons to this approach, and it will occasionally result in less idiomatic English as well.

Hope that helps!

May 17, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lbodle

Yes, thank you!

June 2, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jormungand10

Would vem väntar ni be acceptable? Minus the på?

October 8, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/devalanteriel

Not as a translation here, but it's occasionally used to mean "who do you expect [for something]?"

October 8, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nailajb

Curious - why can I not say, "Vem väntar du efter?" when we use that formulation for "längtar" and I believe also "hittar"?

September 17, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/devalanteriel

Good question. That actually used to be a correct form as well, and it's not an uncommon phrasing in e.g. older Bible translations and psalms. I'm afraid I don't know why it fell out of fashion.

September 17, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nailajb

Tack! At least I know I'm not crazy! :)

September 18, 2018
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