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"Nereye gidiyorsun?"

Translation:Where are you going?

3 years ago

36 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/JamesTWils
JamesTWils
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I suppose it is too bad that we lost whither and whence. These things would be easier to translate explicitly, if we still had them.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jdfromdublin
jdfromdublin
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If enough people started reusing these archaic words, we could bring them back and I hope we do :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DarcX
DarcX
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Is the -ye in "nereye" a dative case ending?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Selcen_Ozturk
Selcen_Ozturk
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yes

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RikSha
RikSha
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So in German it would be 'wohin' = 'nereye' and 'wo' = 'nerede', right?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Selcen_Ozturk
Selcen_Ozturk
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genau

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EstanislaoRon

what does it mean? :S

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo
mizinamo
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It means whatever the dative case expresses.

Most basically, it's "to", as in the target of movement (okula gidiyorum, I am going to the school) or the recipient of a gift (sana bir hediye verdim, I gave a present to you).

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MuhammadNagi

This "genitive case" lesson is yet to come, right? Or I may be missing on something?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Super-Svensk
Super-Svensk
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If the verb stem is git-, why is it gid in this tense?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vvsey
vvsey
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It changes because of the vowel coming after it. I think "gitmek" ("to go") is one of that small group of verbs that people started using before they invented grammar. So it's somewhat irregular; most languages have those. Gitmek and etmek are the two most important verbs that follow this pattern. Gitmek >> gidiyor; etmek >> ediyor. But this is definitely not the rule. Bitmek, itmek, tutmak, yatmak - just a few examples; the verb stems of these do not change from t to d. With other types of words, nouns, etc., this type of consonant change is wide-spread. There are simple rules describing the process. With verb stems, however, it is very rare.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Super-Svensk
Super-Svensk
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Teşekkürler!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/belma332

Does ussually all verbs ends on thiis "mek" is that inffinitive sufix?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo
mizinamo
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Yes, -mEk is the infinitive suffix; it follows the small vowel harmony so you have "gitmek, yemek, içmek, gelmek" with -mek after front vowels but "okumak, yazmak, oturmak, almak" with -mak after back vowels.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/belma332

Thank you :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DarcX
DarcX
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I think it has something to do the a vowel coming right after, much like kitap->kitabı

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/wyqtor
wyqtor
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It is remarkable how similar Turkish is to Japanese, despite being a continent apart ! They have 'ni' for dative and 'de' for location ! Eerily similar to Turkish 'de' minus the vowel harmony...

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sarmadkinany
sarmadkinany
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It is not really remarkable, because Turks are originally from the area close and around Mongolia, north of China, which is not too far from Japan. And thus, Turkish is classified as an Asian language.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/joklomo
joklomo
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I do understand that nerede has to be in the dative case, (maybe i missed it) but i only remember bana sana ona etc. How does it work with words like nerede?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo
mizinamo
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The dative case ending is -(y)E (small vowel harmony).

For "where, from where, to where", the case endings get tacked onto a stem "nere".

So you have nerede "where? (locative)", nereye "to where? (dative)", and nereden "from where? (ablative)".

Similarly with "burada, buraya, buradan", "şurada, şuraya, şuradan", and "orada, oraya, oradan" for "(to/from) here" and "(to/from) there".

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/joklomo
joklomo
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Thank you so much!!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Hakim747
Hakim747
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And, I've realized something.

Nerede, -de is the locative suffix, right?

Then, I'm sure Nereden is also exist. :D

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo
mizinamo
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Yes, that's right, and yes, it exists :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Hakim747
Hakim747
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Tamam. Çok teşekkürler~ :D

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/waswad
waswad
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Why we can't use nerede here?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AlexinNotTurkey
AlexinNotTurkey
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"nerede" implies a static location (in/at what place).

"nereye" implies motion "to" somewhere. (to what place)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PolMicheal
PolMicheal
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Where would the pronoun go if it were included in this sentence?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/msdvir
msdvir
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Is there any easier way to say "where are you going"?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo
mizinamo
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What could be easier than this? Honest question.

It's just "to where" (nere-ye) "you are going" (gid-iyor-sun).

You can't really leave much out here.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/msdvir
msdvir
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Thanks for the response! At the beginning I was very surprised to see how different was building a sentence in Turkish, and even in Hebrew which is my mother tongue this sentence would be composed similarly to English ... Now when I'm about to finish this tree, I'm truly ok with Turkish verbs...

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ilknr1
ilknr1
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If you just say "Nereye?" in daily speech, everyone in Turkiye understands as "Nereye gidiyorsun?".

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/starcluster-

Is ''nereye'' pronounced as it is written ?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AlexinNotTurkey
AlexinNotTurkey
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Yep :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MustafaRadwan

I know that question words come at the end of the sentence... Why did this come at the beginning? Can anyone please explain???

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AlexinNotTurkey
AlexinNotTurkey
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Wh-Question words (like the word for when/where/why/what) are always located in the question exactly where they would be in the answer.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Hsn626796
Hsn626796
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Why "Where do you go" is wrong ?

1 year ago