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  5. "Cuenta conmigo."

"Cuenta conmigo."

Translation:Count on me.

December 18, 2012

48 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gggwynplaine

How would you say "Count with me?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/virharding

Cuenta conmigo, AH AH AH!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/skepticalways

Duo accepted "Count with me," Sept. 15, 2017.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RandomCanadian12

uno lingot ah ah ah
dos lingots ah ah ah
tres lingots ah ah ah


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alxzien

To conform with spanish convention, wouldn't it be lingotes, adding an e


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Myrrha01

That's because it's Espanglish, not Spanish


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lingots4Luck

That's tres lingots for you


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RyagonIV

That would be "I count on/with myself."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alxzien

Cuento means 'i count', Cuenta for s/he or usted, the formal you, Cuentas for you informally, Cuentan for they, and Cuentamos for we


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/marcy65brown

Contamos for we.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/inckwise

How come the translation is "on" instead of "with"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jecxjo

Because the English phrase is "count on me" as in "you can count on me to get it done."

Conmigo is a special pronoun form of the phrase "with..." There are also contigo (with tú) and consigo (with usted, èl, ella, etc).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/amble2lingo

"Contar con" is an expression (that we learned a while back in Duo) that means "to rely/count on." "Cuenta," as used here, is the 2nd person (tú) Imperative/Command form of "contar." Since we haven't learned the Imperative yet, this is kind of an unfair sentence here. "Tú puedes contar conmigo" would have been better.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/inckwise

But I wonder why then when I type "Count with me" into SpanishDict I get "Cuenta conmigo" for the translation and when I type in "Count on me" I get "Contrar conmigo"???


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bsimmo14

Contrar is just the infinitive. But you typed in a conjugated version and it knew what you were talking about


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tangochica

no.. contar is the infinitive


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lorrae
  • 1566

Sorry, but I still don't get it. Shouldn't "count on me" be "cuenta en mi"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/oszka496

Well, why would you want to translate it literally? In Spanish "contar con" means "to count on", "to rely on", e.g. contar con alguien, cuenta conmigo. English phrasal verb is "count on", Spanish - "contar con", that's all.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lorrae
  • 1566

Contar also means to count (as in numbers) doesn't it? So how would you say "count with me?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/oszka496

It will be "contar conmigo" or "contar numeros conmigo" - it's really about the context


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tormetillis

A lot of comments say it depends on context. So tell us Duolingo, how do we tell the context from one short sentence. I got an F in mind reading.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MsMoneyCPA

"Conmigo" means with me. How is this incorrect?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/flint72

¿ En español, dicen

"Tú puedes contar conmigo" ?

In English I would usually add "you can" at the beginning, to give "you can count on me", but since this is an expression I want to check that I can indeed translate it semi-directly. Thanks!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NilsGP

Is "count upon me" too oldfashioned?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NadiaIslam3

i thought that it means "count with me" because if you press the meaning then it says "count with me" and not "count on me"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Vitruvius1

Why "rely on me" is wrong?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TallRoberto

in another sentence in this lesson cuenta means 'tell' what makes the meaning of cuenta different in this sentence?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Matt354592

is this one of those cases where the preposition means something different? like pensar en is think about instead of think in


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/blondbiddy

I put 'He counts on me'. Correct!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Michael777

"You count on me", should be ok. Not accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Selenejk

Why not you (usted) count on me


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FrancescaK846841

Both answers are correct count on me or count with me


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Stacy356

I thought it would be "it counts with me".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Care108

I said, "You can count on me," and it was marked wrong. Only correct answer was "Cuenta conmigo." How come?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tomisin_

I said check with me, why is that wrong?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/amble2lingo

"Cuenta" meaning check is a noun, (as in "Camarero, la cuenta, por favor") not a verb. Your sentence would probably be: "Revisa conmigo."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lingots4Luck

Uses a high pitched, squeaky, pre-puberty voice "Count with me!" And the kids say... "Yay!"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/marihaley

The translation in the question states: "You can count with me." (Where does the "can" come from). Entirely different than what it states here: "Count on me." Neither appears to be the correct translation with is "Count with me". DL: The inconsistencies that have arisen since the change in format are very frustrating and not conducive to learning.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AllanaLope10

count with me, its wrong


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/W0LF9078

boi my answer should be accepted

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