"Smörgåsen är min."

Translation:The sandwich is mine.

March 31, 2015

28 Comments
This discussion is locked.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/abdulrahma444077

Mitt is used for words that go with "ett" e.g ett glas , while min is used for words that go with "en" e.g en fågel


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/amsyarzero

tack så mycket!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/shahzaibbu

plz some one tell me the difrence between mitt and min


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Warnerau

Min is for 'en' words (en fisk) and mitt is for 'ett' words (ett äpple)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/olleoskifelle

What about mina? Like mina barn


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kerstin482199

Mina is for plurals. "Barn" can be singular AND plural. So, mitt barn is "my child", and mina barn is "my children". As the smörgås is singular, it is min. En smörgås. I just realized that there are already a lot of answers to the same question here. Reading before asking or answering helps! ;-)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LadySeabrooke

An important phrase to know in any country and language, on par with "Where is the bathroom?" "This is a pen" and "My hovercraft is full of eels."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fraumueller

Imagine this sentence as a start for an epic war. XD


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JellyMarck

So "Min" means both "My" and "mine" ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/devalanteriel

Yes, that's correct.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AdamzGray

Oooh, so we need to tell the difference based on context? Cool!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KatarinaSa10

What is the difference between My and mine


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/devalanteriel

They're both possessive - but "my" is an adjective which is used to describe nouns, while "mine" is a pronoun.

So you get "it is my sandwich" because "my" describes that the sandwich belongs to you. But you can't say "it is my", because you need a noun with it.

You also get "it is mine", but you can't say "it is mine sandwich", because the "mine" describes "it" and not a noun that follows. Hence, "the sandwich is mine" really means "the sandwich belongs to me", while "it is my sandwich" means "it is the sandwich which belongs to me".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DVLoder

My is posessive before the subject in the sentance and mine is used after the subject.

"It is my book". "The book is mine".

Thats about it.


[deactivated user]

    So do 'min' and 'mitt' both translate as 'my/mine'? Is that the same for 'mina' too? 'Smörgåsarna är mina'?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/skalpadda

    Yep. "Mina smörgåsar" - "My sandwiches", "Smörgåsarna är mina" - "The sandwiches are mine".


    [deactivated user]

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AhmedAmine448576

      The sandwich is mine! Mine at last! Mwahahahaha! The phrasing has dramatic and forceful connotations in English. Is this also true for the phrase in Swedish?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/devalanteriel

      No, not in the slightest, not as written.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Fuall3raTV

      Why is "my sandwich" wrong in this case?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arnauti

      How do you mean, My sandwich is mine or The sandwich is my sandwich?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TanyaMarch3

      Why "Smörgåsen är mina" is wrong? Do we use mina with plurals?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/devalanteriel

      mina is the plural form, and smörgåsen is in the definite singular.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kerstin482199

      I wrote "It is my sandwich", that was considered wrong. Hmm.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/devalanteriel

      Well, it's a different sentence construction.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/awart1881

      What's the difference between "smörgås" and "macka"? To my very limited knowledge they both mean "sandwich"


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/skalpadda

      They mean the same thing, macka just sounds a bit more colloquial.

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