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  5. "Dad has a pain in his back."

"Dad has a pain in his back."

Translation:Pappa har ont i ryggen.

March 31, 2015

13 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/podgorsk

Can one say en ont or only ont is acceptable? Is ont a noun?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mike.liddle

does pain in the neck/back/... have the same idiomatic meaning in Swedish as English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/devalanteriel

It's not the same as "pain in the a**" if that's what you mean. I haven't heard "pain in the neck/back" used idiomatically in English though.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mike.liddle

It's the same meaning, just more polite and gentle.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/devalanteriel

Then no, the idiomatic meaning doesn't transfer. I guess I'm just not polite enough. :)

Swedish golfer Helen Alfredsson once tried to say during a press conference that she had back pains, but her English was only good enough to produce "I have a great pain in my a**."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Will709432

A "pain in the neck" is a very common saying in English, as in "you're a right pain in the neck" about an annoying person, or "it's a pain in neck" about a difficult and annoying situation. But I saw on here something like "Han har ont i nacken" meaning he has a sore throat. So I'm still wondering how you'd actually say he has a pain in the neck, meaning an annoyance, or maybe you just can't say that in Swedish because it would literally mean a pain!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/devalanteriel

No, ont i nacken means having a painful neck; you're thinking of ont i halsen which means having a sore throat.

I am honestly not really sure how I'd translate being a pain in the neck. It doesn't really have a direct anatomic equivalent.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Will709432

Ont i halsen. Yes I remember now. Don't know where I got nacken from! :) Pity Swedes don't have a similar phrase. Thanks.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/devalanteriel

To be fair, it might just be me not coming up with any at the moment as well. :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RossFrazier

I am confused when the definite is used. Ryggen is used here while in another sentence it is "Hennes rygg ar sa snygg." Another sentence about someone signing their name on a man's chest is brost. But if his chest hurt, ont i brostet.

Is the definitive use for pain?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/devalanteriel

Yes, Swedish generally prefers using "the [body part]" when it's obvious to whom said body part belongs. But when we don't, we also use a possessive such as min, din, hans, hennes. In those cases, you can't use the definite, just like you wouldn't say "his the chest".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rusty401767

Mannens rygg, hennes rygg,why ryggen here


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/devalanteriel

Please see e.g. my reply to RossFrazier.

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