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  5. "They speak English in Englan…

"They speak English in England."

Translation:Labhraíonn siad Béarla i Sasana.

March 31, 2015

10 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VaclavH

wouldn't there be definitive article with England, and hence sa as preposition? I see in other sentences the definitive article being used.. (but not translated to English)... can anyone clarify?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/liamog

Sasana is one of the countries that has no definitive article in Irish.

http://www.tearma.ie/tiortha


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VaclavH

very helpful link! GRMA


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CobaltOakTree

Kind of off-topic question, but: why Sasana? Where did that name come from?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CobaltOakTree

I see! Saxons. Can't fool the Irish, it seems. xD It makes sense now. Thanks. :D


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MollyCusta

Where does Béarla come from, clearly no connection to Sasana


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL

béarla (lower case b) just means speech, or even "mouth noise". béarla na n-éan - "birdsong", béarlagair - "jargon", francbhéarla - "lingua franca". It has just come to be used as the name for the English language.

Note that there is no connection between Gaeilge and Éire either.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JuergenZirak

Hmm, if I can find it fast enough, I can delete my comment on a very recent exercise introducing Sasana, which basically posed the same question. And yes, I did notice that Gaeilge and Éire are also not obviously related. I also wonder if béarla had some negative connotation when becoming the word for the English language, since I believe it is not uncommon to value foreign languages less than one's own mother tongue.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MicheleTreCaffe

...question: would 'labhratar (?) béarla' not be better, along that lines of 'úsáidtear an punt i Sasana' ?

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