https://www.duolingo.com/Kudah

Difference between Brazil and Portuguese language

Im trying to figure this out- what is the difference between the Portuguese used in Brazil and that used in Portugal?

I've read an article about an agreement signed in 2008 in Portugal and 2009 in Brazil to unify the languages and I would like to know if the Portuguese I am learning on Duolingo follows this unification agreement. Anyone to explain this to me??? Thanks in advance. Below is an extract of the article I am referring to.


"In 1990, the Community of Portuguese Language Countries (CPLP), which included representatives from all countries with Portuguese as the official language, reached an agreement on the reform of the Portuguese orthography to unify the two standards then in use by Brazil on one side and the remaining Lusophone countries on the other. This spelling reform went into effect in Brazil on 1 January 2009. In Portugal, the reform was signed into law by the President on 21 July 2008 allowing for a 6-year adaptation period, during which both orthographies will co-exist. All of the CPLP countries have signed the reform. In Brazil, this reform will be in force as of January 2016. Portugal and the other Portuguese speaking countries have already started using the new orthography."

March 31, 2015

10 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Gabriel1897

The "two languages" are very similar. It's probably like the difference between american english and british english. There are some words and expressions that differ the two variations but a Brazilian can easily understands a Portuguese.

In a general mode, the "only" thing you should know is that Portuguese people use more frequently the pronoun "tu" and the Brazilians use "você" ("tu" is more often used by us who live in the south).

Good luck with your studies.

March 31, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/tolivefreely

That's a great example! I haven't really looked into Portugal Portuguese so the only difference I really noticed was that Brazilians have a very different pronunciation for the words. Portugal Portuguese also kind of reminded me more of Spanish (especially with the use of "tu").

March 31, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/jandersen78

Having lived in Portugal for over a year you'll also notice that Portugal's version will have more "shooshing", for example, estou sounds like "eshtou". Also, Portuguese has been spoken in Portugal for many hundreds of years longer than in Brazil which has led to some really interesting and fun regional accents/flavors that you'll find, for example in Madeira and the Azores. In the Azores I heard Domingo sounding like "Domwingo" ;-)

April 1, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Etherrift

I actually have a friend that is also my Portuguese tutor (once a week tutor + duolingo is a great combo). She's actually from Rio and I keep hearing that "shhhh" sound in many of the "s"-containing words. That example, "estou", is a perfect example because she'll be like "eshtou". She claims that she hardly notices it, but that "shh" sound is so jarring and noticeable to the English-speaker's ears. Ha! But she did indicate that many of the southern Brazil and Rio have a lot of influence from their European counterparts, so there's a good chance much of the Portuguese in southern Brazil can resemble that of Portugal. I have a gaming friend in World of Warcraft from Rondonia near Amazonas. He simply doesn't have a "sh" at all in his tongue, and he actually puts a harder "d" sound on words like "dificuldade"; almost sounds like Spanish!

April 1, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Kudah

Thanks!

March 31, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Denfisksson

This is really interesting. I plan to learn Portuguese in Duolingo as soon as I finish my German tree and I was really wondering if the Portuguese taught here would be useful in Portugal. I guess that the differences are similar to the ones we find between Mexico and Spain Spanish for instance. So that means that, theoretically, it will be indeed useful.

March 31, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/josephkt

the differences are not huge but they are differences you have to be aware of not just vocabulary but grammar.i'm not and portuguese expert but they are things that would be considered by a Brazilian to be old fashioned and archaic and uppity and a portuguese not to be grammatically incorrect (ex ;pronouns usage) i'have see that situation being around portugues speakers

March 31, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/RafaRiff

Yes. In Brazil, the agreement is standard since 2009, and should be obligatory from 2016 on. In Portugal there is still a lot of discussion over its application.

But this agreement is on orthography only, and syntax and other parts of grammar are not affected. The rules in all portuguese-speaking countries are the same, the difference is in its usage and in the word selection.

Brazilian programs are not unusual in most of these countries, so a brazilian accent is no problem in understanding. Unfortunately, the opposite is not true, and the lack of contact brazilians have with foreign portuguese may slow down a little bit comprehension, but not avoid it.

March 31, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Davu

You'll be relieved to know Duolingo uses post-reform Portuguese spelling. The agreement didn't eliminate all the differences between the two variants of the language though. More importantly, there are small differences in grammar and vocabulary that can still trip you up. Even so, learning Brazilian Portuguese with Duolingo is a good introduction to writing and reading Portuguese in general.

For me the major difference between European and Brazilian Portuguese is not between the written forms but between the spoken forms. There are two aspects to this; the first, and probably the most important, is the pronunciation and I mention this at length here:

https://www.duolingo.com/comment/4874566

The second is the different way people express themselves in Portugal and Brazil. For example, as Gabriel1897 implies, knowing how to conjugate "tu" will be a lot more useful in Portugal than in most of Brazil. I suppose these sort of things are easy to fix later, however, acquiring a good European accent needs work outside Duolingo right from the very start of your studies.

March 31, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Karli178

its like slang and true English kinda portugese is actually way more sophisticated than Brazilian

March 31, 2015
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