"Eşek"

Translation:Donkey

March 31, 2015

33 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/angelobraam

Great humour course makers, starting the travel skill and the first word that appears is donkey ^^


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Eclectic1234

Is it ever used as an insult?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/YakinAlan

Yes, of course. In Turkish so many animals have certain figurative meanings. "Eşek" is one of them. It is an insult for someone who has improper behaviours.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lisa4duolingo

Maybe I shouldn't walk into this, but I suppose better that I do it than someone else. So here it goes. The word donkey isn't used very often as a word of insult in American English. However, synonyms for donkey do include those that are used as insults. I won't list all of the synonyms here, but you can see a list here. Keep in mind that at least one or two of them could be considered vulgar or offensive, so I advise you to use them with caution. To be safe, I'd stick with donkey.

Also, the donkey is the animal used to represent the Democratic Party in the United States; an elephant represents the Republican Party. Nevertheless, politics is civil enough in America that few, if any, resort to name calling with use of the words "donkey" or "elephant," although you may see a political cartoon used with those animals from time to time and depending on the political leanings of the cartoonist, an insult may be, indeed, be intended.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LangAddict

Interesting, I would also add that "eşec" (pronounced exactly the same) means "failure" in Romanian and can also be used as an insult like "You're a failure". It most likely has been borrowed from Turkish and the meaning of "donkey" disappeared over time and became "failure".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/YakinAlan

It seems to me just a coincidence since there is the French word "échec" which has the same pronunciation and meaning as in Romanian. There is also the verb "échouer" which means "to fail" in French.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lisa4duolingo

Well, I am certain many Republicans in this country would find your educational post quite amusing. Thank you for sharing it with us ... Republican, Democrat, Independent, and/or Rebel alike.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Akash_Polyglot

Wow...great interpreation


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HellasCad

Yes, there is the expression "Eşek eşekler", meaning "donkey of donkeys" :-)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/duonks

Someone called? :-D


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/YakinAlan

It can mean "Donkeys who are donkeys"... :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlexinNotTurkey

I mean, I guess you could call someone a donkey and it be an insult. It isn't very common though :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Eclectic1234

So it's not a thing.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BrokenBottle87

I love this word because in Sicilian dialect, which is different from Italian, "donkey" sounds very similar. I bet it's a loan word from Arabic!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MilanaRus

In Russian we have a word 'ishak', it mean 'donkey' of course) one more loan word)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/v.ivanov

More looks like a loanword from Tatar: there it's işäk, as far as I know, much closer to Russian ишак.

Still generally you are right, the Turkic influence is large and long in Russian.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlexinNotTurkey

Although something important to remember is that Tartar and Turkish are closely related :D "Eşek" and "işäk" come from the same place linguistically.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/v.ivanov

Still different Turkic subgroups — the Oghuz and the Kipchak :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlexinNotTurkey

This is actually from old Turkic. Maybe Arabic got it from Turkish back in the Ottoman times :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MilanaRus

Than more I study Turkish than more I understand how much turkic and arabic words we have in Russian. Amazing!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Akash_Polyglot

What is sicilian dislect ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shamshoomi

In Turkish soaps I noticed people call others that sometimes. Usually to their face and with a teasing tone! What does it mean? Is it an insult? Or an endearing term?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/YakinAlan

It is a derogatory addressing often for person who has lack of proper attitude.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shamshoomi

Oh really! By bad you mean uncivilized or rude, right?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/YakinAlan

Yes. Also sometimes just "stupid".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shamshoomi

Now I get it. It has the same use in Arabic (Donkey meaning stupid or with improper attitude! Thanks.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlexinNotTurkey

If someone called me a donkey in any language, I don't think I would be too happy, Turkish included :D It is imaginable that someone would teasingly call someone this, but it definitely is not a normal nickname. You might be hearing derivations of "eş" though, which means "spouse"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shamshoomi

Even the subtitles translate it as donkey! Probably teasing though!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Stergi3

At is used as a poetic word for horse in Greek, ati, but not eşek. Selections! :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/padm915118

Eşek and ışık had me in tangles for sometime but this nice detailed discussion and also in another thread I think ive finally nailed the two down to their meanings and they won't be constantly changing places in my memory cells any more. Thanks all.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AhmedLatee5

Arkadaşim eş Arkadaşim şek Arkadaşim eşek!!

Something I learned in my Turkish primary school lol XD


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/movenden2

Growing up in Turkey in the 1960s and 70s, I understood that calling someone "son of a donkey" was the worst insult ever.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MrHilmiNevzat

"Eşek" Translation: Donkey

Yak - That's what I say.

Learn Turkish in just 5 minutes a day. For free.