https://www.duolingo.com/isani

Feminine occupations

I noticed that Duolingo uses "ta professeur" for "your (female) teacher". Is this correct? Can "professeur" take an article of either gender, and do all occupations work this way?

May 12, 2012

6 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/ricainrico

"la professeure" is very old-fashioned, and nowadays "le/la professeur" are both acceptable, or even more common "le/la prof" for short. But this is an exception (along with le/la docteur), as a great majority of occupations change according to the gender of the person, unless the masculin form already ends with an e - le/la secrétaire, le/la dentiste etc.

May 12, 2012

https://www.duolingo.com/giuliap

Usually if the masculine noun ends in -eur and the noun comes from a verb, the feminine form ends in -euse. Otherwise, the feminin form ends in -ice. Ex: "Chanter (verb)" --> Chanteur (m) --> Chanteuse (f) Or "Vendre (verb) --> Vendeur (m) --> Vendeuse (f) Acteur becomes Actrice, and in fact "to act" in French is not "act" (it's jouer or agir).

June 19, 2012

https://www.duolingo.com/juliegolick

Some occupations have specific forms for the feminine, often ending -trice. So, for example, "Directeur" and "Directrice." Some of them have even trickled into English, like "Acteur" and "Actrice."

June 9, 2012

https://www.duolingo.com/mforster1uk

Not to mention "madame le maire" (Madam Mayor), or the title "maître" which is used for both male and female advocates.

And as for military ranks, confusion seems to reign. Officially I believe women take the same masculine ranks as the men, so it would be "le sergent Jeanne Dubois", but there seems to be a lot of variation. When I asked a French (male) officer whether it was correct to talk about "le lieutenant" or "la lieutenante" he replied "You tell me!"

Part of the problem is that "Madame la colonelle" traditionally referred to a colonel's wife, not a female colonel.

May 5, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/meggeorge19

Not all occupations work this way, as some job titles completely change context depending on whether they are in the masculine or feminine. For example 'le couturier' is a fashion designer, whereas 'la couturière' means seamstress. The gender of job titles has actually been an active debate in France for years, linked to gender rights and equality. It is rare for genders to change the meaning of the occupation so dramatically, but I would suggest checking before using a different gender.

May 20, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/mforster1uk

Le Petit Robert gives the following example of the use of couturier: « Coco Chanel fut un grand couturier »

May 21, 2013
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