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  5. "¿Qué tienes bajo el sombrero…

"¿Qué tienes bajo el sombrero?"

Translation:What do you have under the hat?

December 18, 2012

90 Comments
This discussion is locked.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kelly-Rose

Si es una araña, yo corro!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nopnsoap

shouldn't it be ...bajo del....?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KACooper33

I would also like to know why del shouldn't be included here.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Santi_Minstrel

the preposition 'bajo' needs no additional particles. However, you can use also 'debajo de' which means exactly the same. Both mean: under, below, underneath, beneath, ... depending on context.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MichealKennedy

Poor people learning English and trying to figure out which of these to use: under, below, underneath, beneath, bottom, down, etc. LOL


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MarinaMimi1

Is it correct to say: la nina duerme cerca el gato?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Santi_Minstrel

No, cerca is followed by 'de', so it becomes la niña duerme cerca del gato


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MarinaMimi1

Thank you Santi! It's like rule, right?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/neiht20

@MarinaMimi1 it's not necessary a rule, its just the word itself. "near" in Spanish is "cerca de" together, you can't have one word without the other there.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Fillmoe

Yes, in a previous thread, someone said that we always need "de" after a preposition. Under is a preposition.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/neiht20

No, prepositions don't always require "de" ("de" itself is a preposition) for example the preposition "a" or "con" typically aren't followed by a "de".
http://www.spanishdict.com/topics/show/9

But many times "de" is used as part of a prepositional phrase such as 'al lado de', 'en lugar de', or 'en vez de'. http://spanish.about.com/od/prepositions/a/compound_prep.htm

In this case "under" can be translated in two ways: 'bajo' (which doesn't require a "de") and 'debajo de' (which does require a "de" as part of a prepositional phrase).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ThrashtilDeath

Below the hat is your face. Under the hat is the top of your head. Two different things IMO.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fastnracey

Is it just me, or is Duolingo really paranoid?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/scottann

Could it imply (as it would in French for example) Where has your brain gone?= are you stupid or what?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sngharmny

I read it with sarcasm as well.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tomasz1

The same question. I thought so, but well... google didn't support this... yet


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/darekm

I think "What do you have under your sombrero" should be allowed.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/daa5417

Sombrero's not an English word and you're translating it from Spanish to English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/darekm

Yes, I did notice. Sombrero is a loan word and absolutely does exist in English as such: http://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/british/sombrero?q=sombrero


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/daa5417

But the purpose, at this point in the lessons is to learn that sombrero means hat in Spanish.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/darekm

Point taken, fair enough. It's just that the "sombrero" is a valid translation of the source sentence.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ShaunOfTheLive

No, it's still not an exact translation. Sombrero in English means a specific type of hat (Mexican), whereas sombrero in Spanish simply means any hat.

Sombrero in English translates to "sombrero mexicano" or "sombrero de charro" in Spanish.

So if the Spanish phrase said "sombrero de charro", you could translate it to English as "sombrero". Otherwise, it translates to "hat" to preserve the meaning.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kathallia

and because sometimes Duolingo allows the translation 'sombrero', but other times it will only accept 'hat'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/YourPetRockPete

My head, son. My head.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/actionturnip

Its pete!!!!!!!!!the rock


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/shuttlecock

why are they using bajo (which I was taught meant short) instead of debajo (which I was taught meant under or underneath)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Eualb

One word can have different meanings

Bajo=short, under

Under=bajo, debajo


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mavster

Does anyone else have trouble with her pronounciation on this one? Is that a computer voice, sometimes hard to understand unless I slow it down.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JessicaBraga4

I have the same problem. She does sound like a computer voice


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LAntoine

Duolingo está interrogando nosotros


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/neiht20

Close, it's either Duolingo está interrogándonos or Duolingo nos está interrogando :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/setsuwa

¿Qué tienes debajo del sombrero? should be right.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Si_Robertson

Can't "bajo" also mean short or low?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/neiht20

Yes, depending on the context it can either mean "under/below" or "short/small".

http://www.wordreference.com/es/en/translation.asp?spen=bajo


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ceb1983

is "What is under your hat?" a correct enough translation?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FrankyFrank

No, that would be, "Qué es bajo tu sombrero?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Santi_Minstrel

Rather, ¿Qué hay bajo tu sombrero? - you changed the words and added a possessive particle.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/roman.ostr

what is "hay"? Is it the same "hay" as in "no hay de gue"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Santi_Minstrel

Hay is the equivalent for 'there is/are', as in There are three apples on the table. It is an impersonal conjugation from the verb 'haber'.

literally, no hay de qué means there is not of what, i.e., there is nothing [to thank], which is why the idiom is used after thank you.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/spofia

How would one then translate the English expression Keep it under your hat?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/daa5417

You would probably either find out a similar expression in Spanish, not translate it at all, or have to actually explain the phrase in a paragraph or two of Spanish. "Keep it under your hat" is an idiom and idioms aren't shared in all languages, so you can't translate it into Spanish (literally) and expect someone to know what you're talking about. Best bet, find a similar idiom in Spanish, or just say "keep it a secret".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/miza713

Does anyone know if this IS actually an idiom? I kind of figured it meant "What have you got up your sleeve?" seeing as I can think of very few instances during which someone would actually want to know if someone was hiding something under their hat.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Santi_Minstrel

In Spain, no, as far as I know...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ckm8

there's one thing we all have under our hats: our head


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/m1c45

almost a year of not practicing now theese lessons are hell


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/shaunrandol

When would you use bajo versus abajo? I'm unclear on the distinction.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Santi_Minstrel

As adverbs, abajo works alone and bajo needs "bajo what".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/shaunrandol

Could you give me an example of each?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Santi_Minstrel

abajo can mean down or downstairs. For instance:

  • ¿Dónde está mi hermano?
  • Abajo

Baja abajo al sótano, por favor (sometimes in Spanish we are redundant; obviously 'bajar' means going down)

'bajo', as adverb (it is also an adjective meaning 'short' (people) or 'low'), means under or below, and needs an object to have sense:

"Bajo la luna llena, los espíritus acechan"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/shaunrandol

Thanks. I appreciate the insight and examples. Gracias.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mjduncan2

Is it ❤❤❤❤❤❤❤!? I hope its ❤❤❤❤❤❤❤! ..... Whoops sorry, why do you think I'm using Duolingo?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ye69

THIS THING SAID I GOT IT WRONG BUT IT SAID IT WRONG. I TYPED WHAT IT SPOKE.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ladislav.

Bellow != beneath


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FabricioRodrix3-

Duolingo offers "What do you've below the hat." as a possible solution. Obviously, that is incorrect.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sdlaiugfklpqt

"Correct solutions: • What do you've under the hat?" That is not an acceptable english sentence.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/neiht20

I agree, I believe that the contraction involving "have" can only be used when "have" is being used as an auxiliary verb (e.g. I have eaten>I've eaten, they have brought>they've brought), but when it's being used on it's own to describe possession, it should be separated.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/abcourter

yes. Below is the same thing as under.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kjello1028

I thought "bajo" was the masculine adjective "short"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/daa5417

Remember, a word can mean multiple things, just like in English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Narnito

i sortof remember being taught the same on an youtube clip. when i looked up on google translate it looks like it may only mean short when used as an adjective, otherwise it looks like below/under


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Santi_Minstrel

Exactly. As an adjective, it is the opposite of 'alto' (high, tall, ...). As a noun, it means bass guitar, a male singer with a very low frequency voice, or a flat or appartment at ground level.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pepe0001

I entered below as well


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mark36

"what is under the hat "was marked correct the "tienes" seems unnecessary to the sentence if this is acceptable as an answer. I got it right but only from previous wrong answers.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/storybookseven

Well, Double D? What is underneath your hat after all these years? >:D


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/orkhydd

Why isn't it implied to be "your" hat by the conjugation "tienes"? I mean, I know why, kind of, but why not "tiene"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kasshiiee

This question is one hundred percent necessary considering everyone hides things underneath their hats.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LaurenHall9

This isn't the weirdest one I've seen. Once, I got "What is under you shirt?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BuckieTheCat

I put "What do you have under that hat" Shouldn't that work also?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/neiht20

"el sombrero"=the hat, "that hat"=ese sombrero. Duo is very picky with word choice.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BuckieTheCat

I liked the lesson with all the weird cat things like the cat sleeps on top of the monkey the cat sleeps among the dogs the cat walks on my shirt the cat walks over my skirt [wich i don't have one so that doesn't even make sence] and i don't care if i misspelled anything.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Manny03p

What difference to say what have you under the hat.....or what do you have under the hat?????


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HelenWende1

No difference, but the first one is archaic usage (usually used in a literary or poetic context). However, it is not grammatically incorrect, just odd-sounding to most.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/azad3h

I think the translation is too literal and this sentence should be more accurately translated into "what do you have under your hat?" but DL doesn't even accept that. In spanish, often you replace the possesive pronoun with the definite article. E.g., ".¿Qué tienes en la mano?", which literally means "what do you have in the hand?", a ridiculously sounding sentence in English, but it really means "what do you have in your hand? ". When you say what do you have under the hat in English, to me it sounds like the hat is not on your head, but instead on the table or in your hand, for example. Whereas in spanish, it is more likely on your head.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/officerjohnw

Can't bajo mean below as well as under?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TomVitt

Why is "what is under the hat?" wrong?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/neiht20

Duo is picky with word choice. You used the wrong verb: What is under the hat?=¿Qué está bajo el sombrero?, What do you have under the hat?=¿Qué tienes bajo el sombrero?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/11ruger11

❤❤❤❤❤❤❤. Please be ❤❤❤❤❤❤❤


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TheDoe90

You've is improper.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Camxre

Isnt it debajo?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Maggie_Bowen

Is that you abe lincoln?!

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