https://www.duolingo.com/DCIvanhoe

Immersion/Translation tips and helps

DCIvanhoe
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I've been working on the Immersion activities and wanted to start a post where we could exchange hints and helps for one another, whether they are for questions in general (such as tactics on how to get more upvotes quicker) or specific (such as specific translations or pages).

Many pages seem to be unfinished, like they get pushed down the queue and they just never get done or looked at. So working on translating them doesn't always seem to be a good use of time. Is it better to only focus on shorter, more recent articles? What say you, my friends?

3 years ago

18 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Deliciae
Deliciae
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Remember that the goal is to learn, not to finish the article. :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DCIvanhoe
DCIvanhoe
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True, and I do try to use the articles as avenues to learn or reinforce learning, but I'm a completionist, therefore I like to do all I believe I can successfully translate before moving on. :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CharmingTiger
CharmingTiger
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Yay for Completionism!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/b05aplmun.ca
b05aplmun.ca
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By the same token, the goal is to learn, not necessarily to maximize your up-votes - and the goal of learning may be better served by working through an entire article than by dashing on to the next bright-and-shiny new one. Or not - depending on one's circumstances and one's goals.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FireAndFocus

I suggest finding a group or at least a partner to target articles together. Finish the article, tell your friend, and get them to review your translations. Then do the same for them.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/roberto727

Lots of wisdom in evidence in this post and the responses. Kudos to DC for trying to improve the DL immersion experience for us all. The reminder that the ultimate goal is learning is another sage observation, and I admire those who try to see a work to completion. Also, the suggestion to spend little or no energy worrying about up votes or questionable practices by some in the community is excellent advice, as is associating with a group to help each other out--not so much with the upvoting (a pleasant by product) but with the actual learning of the language. The immersion situation can be frustrating if you let it be. I started DL last summer, only to give it up after a few weeks because of the boorish behavior of some of my fellow immersion translators. Now, back at it for nearly 3 months, I am thoroughly enjoying the site because of the users--their humor, generosity,sharing and caring. My advice for what it is worth: 1. Keep in mind that your purpose is to learn. The gaming makes it more interesting, but gaining points and up votes should not be your prime focus. 2. Follow people who translate well and who participate in discussions like these. If you are only interested in Spanish, you might want to limit who you follow to those who concentrate on Spanish. There are some wonderful Spanish translators who work on other languages, so it can make your activity stream a little cumbersome if you follow them. 3. Avoid the immersion exercises cued up when you finish a lesson, as this is where you will encounter folks with not a lot of experience translating. It is wonderful that DL encourages new learners to jump right in, but it is not the best use of your time in immersion. Sure, it is a good way to get your feet wet, and if you do work on an article with dozens or hundreds of participants, don't let yourself get caught up in a "translation war." Find your articles by clicking on "Immersion" or by what those you are following are doing. 4. Once you have gained a little confidence in editing, be brave--go for the blue print. Be the first to put a translation on that selection. Then when you get that email notification that someone has "improved" on your work, check it out. Naturally, there will be some you don't agree with, but don't worry about those. Take lessons where you can, and generally those are lessons you will be more prone to remember. As time passes and your translations improve you will probably just ignore corrections to your earliest work rather than be reminded of how bad they were. 5. Frequently read the work of the experienced translators you are following. (You can find what they are working on in their activity steam.) 6. Upload your own articles, translate them, and ask an experienced translator (or your group) to check your work. 7. When you edit, be helpful. Unless it is obvious, explain why you have made a change. If we all do that for each other, everyone benefits.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Perriguez
Perriguez
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The first week I spent on Duolingo I got very disappointed, I started translating some articles from English (I'm Spanish) and the next day I had 20 negative votes from all of them. I noticed that the same guy had changed them all and had given me a negative vote, but the worse thing is that his translations were wrong, they didn't make any sense in Spanish! Fortunately I reported him and he stopped it, but I still can't understand why would someone do something like this ._.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Perriguez
Perriguez
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Sadly there is many people that are in a hurry to finish as many titles of new articles as they can to get as many votes as they can, and usually those translations are just copied from Duobot or make no sense in the other language. As the goal is to learn, as Deliciae said, we shouldn't worry so much about others' votes, but focus on the improvement of the language, and I don't think translating those titles will make you learn a language ;)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/b05aplmun.ca
b05aplmun.ca
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Translating titles can be a good start, though, for people at a very beginning level. (Duolingo promotes immersion at quite an early stage in learning, so people without previous knowledge of the language may not be up for even a modest amount of complexity.)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CharmingTiger
CharmingTiger
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Yup! I started with single words, titles, and simple sentences. I waited until my tree was completely finished before I even stepped foot into Immersion! Doing it simple at first is a great way to get your feet wet without drowning in a flood of down-votes due to a slew of horrendous (though well-intended) translations.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Perriguez
Perriguez
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Of course you're right, but I have seen people that have reached translation tier 10 and are still with them! In my opinion, we should try to move to the text as soon as we feel comfortable with the language, we all learn more from our mistakes

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CharmingTiger
CharmingTiger
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Tier 10, without even translating a proper sentence?!? It must be really boring to do that. It's kind of like those people are punishing themselves. They are always on the lookout for the easiest translations, and they never improve.

Just dig into a hard sentence and sift through it until you fit all the pieces together. It's a really good feeling when you come away from a sentence like that, and know you gave it your all, regardless of the actual accuracy of the translation.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Keima.

I agree with Deliciae, but i share your feelings as well, especially when the next uploads are copied and pasted from duobots translation.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DCIvanhoe
DCIvanhoe
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People really just copy and paste? Have they no shame! I mean, it can be useful at times, but to copy and paste is just shameful.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Keima.

Most of the time Duobots translation are in, what i call, 'broken' english!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ed.Chan
Ed.Chan
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I thought translations had to be up-voted.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FreedomWind

I translate to learn. So, it is not a waste of time. I appreciate when proofreaders offer improvements to my translation. I proofread as much as I can. Then I let go of all other expectations. I usually remove an article I uploaded once I notice that no one has translated anything for a few weeks, I proofread it for one last time and then remove it. People have a tendency to translate and proofread the most recent articles and the older ones are forgotten. I let it be.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DamnedRaven

As well as working with these articles, I have recently been using immersion at Yahoo Answers Spanish. https://espanol.answers.yahoo.com/. I think if a question and ask it in Spanish and then translate my answers or translate other peoples questions and answer them in Spanish. There is another thing I am going to try to help my learning and that is learning the translation of songs that I like so I can sing along with them in Spanish. I think it will a little easier and fun since I already know the words to the songs. Some of them are already on youtube with Spanish lyrics, like this: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0JtmWptKDsg, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ri8PYWp954I, and https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WvYsIGYsgJQ. Youtube has a lot of others.

3 years ago
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