https://www.duolingo.com/tnel1

Language tips for a short visit to Turkey...

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Hi Everyone!

In about a week I'll be heading to Turkey for a short visit. If you were in my shoes what might you concentrate on to have a little fun with your little Turkish? :)

Most interactions will be in hotels, stores, restaurants, or at places of interest. In my daily life I shop almost weekly in Turkish markets (and eat in Turkish restaurants) so anything you can think of to say in those encounters would be much appreciated and be put to good use.

I'm digging around for Turkish travel phrase stuff a bit myself, but open to hearing about your favorites, or seeing a little sample dialogue by anyone already good at Turkish, or hearing about how you studied/used a new language for a trip, or anything...:)

April 6, 2015

30 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Selcen_Ozturk
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are you a student? then always ask for a student discount even if you are shopping :) "öğrenci indirimi yok mu?" :)

April 6, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/tnel1
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No, but I wish I was! :) I love learning and being a student...and getting discounts! ;)

April 6, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/DenDag
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If you are ever going to use "dolmuş" for cheaper travel within locations in the city, in most cities, they will stop at anywhere on the street if you would like them to stop, to get out of course :), unlike buses, trams, etc. What I like hearing in most "dolmuş"es is the phrase "inecek var!" or "(kaptan) müsait bir yerde!," or combinations of it: "müsat bir yerde inecek var." [ (please) drop me at a spot suiting you, (the driverman!) ] . It gives me laughing as I am trying to translate.

April 6, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Selcen_Ozturk
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or you can just say where you want to get off when you are very close to it "caminin yanında!" (by the mosque), "ışıklarda!" (at the traffic lights), "migros'ta" (at migros - a supermarket) etc :)

dolmuş is a really weird and funny thing :D

April 6, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Aizhan06

I laugh when I remember how I was on a dolmus once and completely forgot this phrase, "Inecek var." So, I was just screaming: "Dur! Dur!" :))) And, of course, I got the looks from other passengers. Oh, those tourists...

April 7, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/DespoinaTi
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I'm also considering visiting Kusadasi this summer! I'm following the discussion! :D

April 6, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/ForgedbyHistoria

Don't have any language tips for you, but do you think you could take me with you?

Also, @ Slecen, There are student discounts in Turkish shops? Que suerte....

April 7, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Selcen_Ozturk
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not officially, but they can give you a discount :D In a lot of places in turkey you can and you should bargain.

of course not in big shops, chains etc, like in a mall. You cannot go to an Adidas store and ask for a discount :D

April 7, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/DespoinaTi
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Hahahah, sure, why not? :P

April 7, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/flootzavut
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Not Turkey specific, but stuff like hello, goodbye, please and thank you, maybe introducing yourself in Turkish? In my experience, in any country where they don't take it for granted you'll speak their language coughunlikeanglophonecountriescough, even the littlest effort goes down really, really well. I personally would probably concentrate on getting a few simple phrases that you know will be useful down pat, so that for example if someone holds a door or serves you with food or something, you're comfortable with saying thanks without having to search for the word.

If you can think of a longer phrase that might be useful, it can be fun to surprise people by coming out with something they might not expect. "Turkey is a beautiful country", "I would love a glass of tea" (do they drink it from glasses or cups in Turkey, I just realised that I don't know), or maybe you could really confuse folks by saying something like "I'm very sorry, I don't speak much Turkish" in flawless Turkish? ;D

That's how I'd approach it, anyway. Get those basic polite phrases down pat and anything else is a bonus. Have fun! I've never been to Turkey, and I'm properly jealous ;D

April 7, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/tnel1
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Hi flootzavut, Thanks so much for your ideas! Yes, I am working on a little personal list of trying to convert at least some of what I would do in English to Turkish. The please and thank you's are the least I can do I decided! :) "Please" is easy to remember thank goodness, and I'll get better at that Turkish "thank you" if it kills me. :D I was thinking to make my own little phrase book. Buy a little notebook write a few things in it and have it handy to back me up in various situations. I haven't learned how to order food yet though. I need to find out how to say, "I would like..." Yes, Turkey is beautiful sounds like a good one and one I might even be able to figure out how to form from what I've learned so far! Good idea! Thanks again! :)

April 7, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/flootzavut
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A personal phrasebook sounds like an excellent idea! And at least you have some friendly Turkish speakers you can bug to check your workings.

Funnily enough, I can say and type thanks pretty reliably but I'm sitting here realising I can't for the life of me remember how to say please... 8-o shame I can't lend you the part of my brain where Turkish is stored for a week ;-p

April 7, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/tnel1
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:D I can always use extra brains!

April 7, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/flootzavut
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I know the feeling ;p

April 7, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/bknckn
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This is not Turkey-specific, just the best advice I've ever gotten on studying phrasebook-level language. When you learn how to ask a question, be sure you learn the answers too! Everyone thinks it will be very useful to learn to ask for directions, and it is. But if you remember how to ask "Where is the ___?" and haven't prepared yourself for words like "right," "left," "3 blocks," or "5 minutes," you'll be right back where you started :)

You will have so much fun!

April 7, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/yalcintarkan

just as a quick sum up :

Right = Sağ
at the right handside =Sağda Left = Sol at the left handside= Solda

People never say "x blocks" they prefers "500 meters ahead" = "500 metre ileride"

5 minutes = Beş Dakika

Excuse me = Pardon

Where is the _ ? = __ Nerede ?

How can I go to _ ? = _'e/a/ye/ya nasıl gidebilirim ?

I would like to have _ = __ alabilir miyim ?

PS. When you order a meal they may ask you the serving size/portion by saying "Bir mi bir buçuk mu ?" which means "1 potion or 1,5 portion" you may answer by saying "Bir" or "Bir buçuk"

"Ne içersiniz ?"="What would you like to drink ?" is one of the possible questions you may face with when ordering a meal

In order to make everything much more simple you may use the magic word istiyorum with everything :)

Bir köfte ve bir kola istiyorum.= I would like to have meatballs and a coke

Salata istiyorum.= I want a salad

Bir su istiyorum. = I want a bottle of water

works exactly fine everywhere

April 7, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/tnel1
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:D You are so right!!! I was dreaming of learning to say, "How much does this cost?" (thinking that is one of the easiest conversations to start) and then I realized I haven't mastered the Turkish numbers yet and they aren't the easiest set I've ever come across in the various languages I've studied. Thank you! I will probably post one more time before I go if I have a chance to cobble together my little do-it-yourself phrase book and get any last minute tips. You've inspired me though! Maybe I can list some numbers in my book and when I ask someone I can look at the book as I speak and see if someone will help me a little. :) Thank you!!

April 7, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/DenDag
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You may have a cultural shock with trying to understand directions, we Turcs are not good at being very specific when giving directions. let me correct myself, we can be very specific but in another mentality, using a set of totally different concepts than western way of being specific, sometimes even engaging in many gestures, and some Turcs, (maybe, especially local ones, as it is not valid anymore in bigger cities where people got urbanized enough) would even not stop listening your questions you and would take all the hassle to take you to bring you to the location you want. It really depends whom you have come across with, an urban well-read gentleman/gentlewoman, or a student, or a tradesman, or a farmer way down the road. Just keep the ladies in radar, many are very kind and gentle, would be more understanding than men, I am presuming. haha I am being sexist.

If you are not experiencing the language, but, got really lost in somewhere, the best person to ask directions would be the cab driver. Many are used to receiving questions and know the directions very well. But, do not expect them to know English. You really do not have to take the cab, only because you have asked something. Do not mind it at all...

April 8, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/SamHansen
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In China people will always give you directions if you ask them. And if they don't know how to get somewhere they will make up directions just to be polite.

April 9, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/NataliaAP44

Everyone else has given good recommendations for phrases, but I just wanted to add that I've found that Turkish people are very appreciative of anyone just trying to speak Turkish. Not that it's the norm, but when I went to Turkey for the first time while I was in high school, a shop owner and his wife in one little town we stopped in were so pleased with our efforts to communicate in Turkish they invited us to eat with them. Just like any country you visit, politeness is really the key, so don't worry if you make some mistakes in language. And have fun on your trip! I hope you have a great time.

April 8, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/jdfromdublin
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iyi yolculuklar :)

April 8, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/tnel1
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Merheba jd! :) "Two journeys?" Ne demek istiyorsun? :)

April 8, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/sercani
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Translation: have a nice trip. farewell etc.

April 8, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/tnel1
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Ohhhhhhhhhhhh! Thank you! :)

April 8, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Andro0
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Altınoluk was my favorite place. It's honestly my favorite place in the world.. hike up the mountain and find the "hippies"! They have some cool land :) they speak like 5 languages minimum and they'll help with your turkish :)

April 7, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/tnel1
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:) You have made me very curious.

April 7, 2015
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