Duolingo is the most popular way to learn languages in the world. Best of all, it's 100% free!

"Jag går gärna på bio med dig."

Translation:I would love to go to the cinema with you.

3 years ago

39 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/AlecHirsch1

Well today I learned that "gärna" and "hjärna" are homophones, and also that "Jag går hjärna på bio med dig/I go brain to the cinema with you." isn't a valid sentence...

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Zmrzlina
Zmrzlina
Mod
  • 14
  • 13
  • 12
  • 10
  • 4
  • 2
  • 2

Indeed! Thus, jättegärna and jättehjärna sound exactly the same, but the former meaning "really gladly" and the latter "giant brain". It's an ancient boring dad-joke to mix them up...

"Vill du följa med?" (Do you want to come along?)
"Ja, jättegärna!" (Yes, I'd love to!)
"Va?! Har du en jättehjärna?!" (What? You have giant brain?!)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KiwiDressager

Oh man... I have been here a month and already come across that hilARious pun! lol

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jdfromdublin
jdfromdublin
  • 22
  • 22
  • 17
  • 17
  • 16
  • 10
  • 10
  • 10
  • 10
  • 9
  • 9
  • 8
  • 7
  • 7
  • 5
  • 4
  • 3
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2

Just to double check, can one use "gärna" just like "gern(e)" in German?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Zmrzlina
Zmrzlina
Mod
  • 14
  • 13
  • 12
  • 10
  • 4
  • 2
  • 2

More or less.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Karen69472
Karen69472
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 22
  • 22
  • 19
  • 17
  • 13
  • 6
  • 1013

as I understand Arnauti further down here the Swedish "gärna" contains more of an condition than the German "gerne" ...

Right?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Evan__Thomas

this is the hardest lesson in the entire DuoLingo swedish course.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/daneestone2
daneestone2
  • 25
  • 11
  • 10
  • 9
  • 9
  • 9
  • 9
  • 8
  • 6
  • 5
  • 3
  • 3
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 539

the answer is 'the cinema', then why not 'bion' instead of 'bio'

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Zmrzlina
Zmrzlina
Mod
  • 14
  • 13
  • 12
  • 10
  • 4
  • 2
  • 2

In some expressions English will prefer one of definite or indefinite, while Swedish prefers the other. To go to the cinema is one of those, being definite in English but indefinite gå på bio in Swedish.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/amber_jin

in english when one say"go to the cinema", it does not necessarily mean a perticular cinema unless THE was stressed when speaking. and yes, i want a lingot :P

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Karen69472
Karen69472
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 22
  • 22
  • 19
  • 17
  • 13
  • 6
  • 1013

why the "would"?

I think it should be correct and accepted, if I translate it with "I like to go to the cinema with you". If so, what is wrong with it?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Arnauti
Arnauti
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 24
  • 21
  • 18
  • 16
  • 12
  • 11
  • 11
  • 9
  • 9
  • 6
  • 6
  • 2
  • 666

gärna is a Swedish word that doesn't have an exact English counterpart. There's gladly, but you don't really use it the same way. When someone says they'd gärna do something, in English you'd say they'd love to do something.

'I like to go to the cinema with you' would be Jag tycker om att gå på bio med dig in Swedish. Different meaning.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Karen69472
Karen69472
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 22
  • 22
  • 19
  • 17
  • 13
  • 6
  • 1013

Tack så mycket!

I hope/think I got it now. I'm not native English and the different meaning that you mention is very slight and I am as well influenced by the German "gerne", which obviously has the same root as the Swedish "gärna" but does not contain the English condition as in "would" ...

Is it like that?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Arnauti
Arnauti
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 24
  • 21
  • 18
  • 16
  • 12
  • 11
  • 11
  • 9
  • 9
  • 6
  • 6
  • 2
  • 666

My German isn't that great, but it seems to me that you could use gerne the same way in sentences like Ich komme gerne morgen where the meaning would really be conditional too?

I think you're right though that you're more likely to say ich würde gerne … in German. While you can certainly say jag skulle gärna … in Swedish too, it often works just as well with the present tense. It could be because the Swedish present tends to cover so much future, plus we generally use conditionals much less than they do in German. So if it's clear that the present tense refers to future events, that's enough for gärna to get a conditional meaning in Swedish while it might not always be in German – not all that sure about the last part, but it's a reasonable assumption :)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/peerVal
peerVal
  • 22
  • 11
  • 9
  • 7
  • 2

This is only meant to be used as an answer and not as a proposal/suggestion, right?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Risto110913
Risto110913
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 24
  • 20
  • 42

Tighter, it does not allow alternative ways to say. Duolingo is more for testing not for teaching.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dlorbik

"I'll be happy to go..." not good enough?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lithovore

Or "I'll go gladly..."?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Loulou_in_LA
Loulou_in_LA
  • 13
  • 12
  • 12
  • 6
  • 5
  • 4
  • 4
  • 2

"I would happily go to the movies with you" was marked wrong. ?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/devalanteriel
devalanteriel
Mod
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 23
  • 23
  • 23
  • 1851

This is the normal way of saying "would like/love to go", so though gärna can be close to "happily", it's a little too literal. We do accept "gladly", though - it's a little closer.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Loulou_in_LA
Loulou_in_LA
  • 13
  • 12
  • 12
  • 6
  • 5
  • 4
  • 4
  • 2

"gladly" and "happily" are synonymous. Check a thesaurus.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HaroldWonh
HaroldWonh
  • 25
  • 24
  • 23
  • 13
  • 12

Hm. They're not used in the same way, though, are they? Certainly not in Britain. "Gärna" seems to be used just like the German "gerne", and "gladly" fits both. Whereas "happily" sounds like a very, um unhappy translation.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/devalanteriel
devalanteriel
Mod
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 23
  • 23
  • 23
  • 1851

I agree. They do share a sense, but not this one.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bigswedeej

When i see gärna i think of yearn, which would almost work here??

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/devalanteriel
devalanteriel
Mod
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 23
  • 23
  • 23
  • 1851

They're definitely in the same ballpark, although I'd typically translate that as längta. :)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tamara76b

Can I say "till bio"? or bio comes always with pa?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Zmrzlina
Zmrzlina
Mod
  • 14
  • 13
  • 12
  • 10
  • 4
  • 2
  • 2

It's "på" with bio.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rut962457
rut962457
  • 25
  • 22
  • 14
  • 7
  • 1045

You say Jag går till bion och köper biljetter, you buy the tickets but don not watch the film.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Vlad514020

Why this sentence is wrong "I go with pleasure to cinema with you"? "Gärna" should be equivalent to "with pleasure".

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JennWUK

To my ear that doesn't sound like good English. Firstly you have missed "the" (to the cinema) but also "I go with pleasure to..." isn't the right order of words in English. Correct sentiment but not how to phrase it in English.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Patti309623

why not go to the movie?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GlennaJo
GlennaJo
  • 22
  • 8
  • 225

why is "the movies" or "a movie" not accepted? "Movie theater" sounds redundant at least in American English and "cinema" sounds pretentious.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mpoloni23

Is there a reason that "I would like to walk to the theater with you" wouldn't be acceptable?

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/devalanteriel
devalanteriel
Mod
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 23
  • 23
  • 23
  • 1851

gå på is a fixed phrase meaning "go to"; gå till would be "walk to".

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jonilo4
Jonilo4
  • 10
  • 9
  • 4
  • 2

Was 'the' before cinema really necessary?

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/devalanteriel
devalanteriel
Mod
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 23
  • 23
  • 23
  • 1851

Yes, "go to cinema" isn't very good English.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JacobLoMenzo

Why is "går" before "gärna"? Also, shouldn't "går" be infinitive (gå)?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Berniebud
Berniebud
  • 15
  • 13
  • 11
  • 8
  • 7
  • 6
  • 3
  • 3

"Gärna" is an adverb, it doesn't literally translate to "Would like to", it's just the closest in meaning.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Marisja7
Marisja7
  • 25
  • 16
  • 11
  • 11
  • 10
  • 10
  • 7
  • 7
  • 6
  • 5
  • 2

The verb always takes the second place.

9 months ago