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  5. "The judge drinks coffee."

"The judge drinks coffee."

Translation:Yargıç kahve içer.

April 7, 2015

23 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/UmarHussai3

Anyone else choose Hakim? (both urdu and arabic it means judge!)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/orde90

Hakim is much more common than yargıç


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ektoraskan

Both are correct.

Note that "Hâkim" is spelt with a circumflex accent.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnCatDubh

Why the circumflex?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ektoraskan

That's actually how the word is written. But not everyone uses it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/myahyamuhaimin

how do we type that letter with a Turkish keyboard?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ektoraskan

(Shift+3) -release- A


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/myahyamuhaimin

I'm using Linux.

I tried your technique,
I tried this table: https://tools.oratory.com/altcodes.html,
no luck!

Finally, I found it!
It's [Alt Gr]+A for my keyboard layout.

ââââââ

Hâkim


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OumAlwaffa

Who said that?? Hakim in Arabic could mean both a doctor or a wise man but never a judge.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Selcen_Ozturk

a doctor in Turkish can also be hekim, but not hakim :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bassem253593

Yes ....you are right


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AyaA2

Why isn't it: kahveyi ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ToBePolyglott

The judge drinks coffee. Yargıç kahve içer. (General)

The judge drinks the coffee. Yargıç kahveyi içer. (Specific)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnCatDubh

That would be ‘the coffee’, I suppose.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Markus_H

why is "yargıçı" wrong?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DottyEyes

Because "the judge" is the SUBJECT of the sentence. You always use the NON-MODIFIED form of the word for the subject of a sentence, whether you mean "the [noun]" or "a [noun]." But if you do mean "a [noun]," then you use the non-modified form, but you add "bir" in front of it (sorry for all caps, which I'm using in place of italics for emphasis):

Yargıç ekmek yer. "The judge eats bread." Bir yargıç ekmek yer. "A judge eats bread."

You use the "yargıçı" form to mean "the judge" only for OBJECTS in sentences. In the following examples, the judge is the object of the action:

Aslan yargıç yiyor. "The lion is eating a judge." Aslan yargıçı yiyor. "The lion is eating the judge."

Duo-experts, please correct me if I've erred!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ektoraskan

All correct! Very nice explanation! :-]

Just one tiny thing: "Yargıçı" is also incorrect in terms of phonetics. The ç should soften when the word receives a vowel: Yargıcı*.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlexinNotTurkey

This looks good :) Also, if you want to put something in italics, you can surround the word with and asterix () word. If you want it to be bold, used two on each side bold. If you want it bold and italicized, use three on either side bam. :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DottyEyes

Harika, AlexinNotTurkey! I had tried [i]/[/i] before to no avail. So, not only have I learned some Turkish, but I've learned some coding on Duolingo. (You might have created an emphasis monster here, haha!)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/A.Ouzounis

Very good explanation


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NadaElarab1

What's the different between hakim , hăkim ??!!

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