"Io mangio l'uva."

Translation:I eat the grapes.

December 19, 2012

110 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/TiagoMoita_PT

The dictionary hints say "grapes", instead of "grape"

December 19, 2012

https://www.duolingo.com/infinitebuffalo

it gave both options to me.

April 13, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/ShoobyD

That's because "uva" is both singular grape, and a collective term for grapes. i.e. when you wanna say "I ate grapes", you can use "uva", but for "I ate three grapes" you must use "uve", which is the plural form.

September 8, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/KarenLynn11

And yet it won't accept grape (singular). Sigh.

May 31, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Berto29441

I think that the comments arise from different meanings given to the same word: grape, grapes. If you, with "I eat a grape" understand that you are eating a bunch of grapes, the singular should be accepted, but if you understand that you are eating one "berry", one "acinus" of grapes you understand that your reply is wrong.

June 1, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/michael582015

That's tricky, and underhanded.

August 19, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/rajul285485

Will the article for uve be Gli?

April 19, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/Berto29441

No: it would be "le", but uve doesn't mean "two or more bunch of grapes" ( = due o più grappoli d'uva). It signifies "two (or more) kinds of grapes.

April 19, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw

No. As shown above it is l'. Uva is a feminine singular noun with a plural meaning. But grammatically it is singular.

April 19, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/Berto29441

rajul was asking about uve (a term which also exists - le uve) and not l'uva ( =la uva = l'uva). Grammatically it's a collective noun, like it could be "crowd" in English. A crowd is a whole of people, l'uva is a whole of chicchi (= the berries of grapes)

April 19, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/Berto29441

Sorry, but you are wrong

June 1, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/BA2012

that'not the plural form

June 17, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/ShoobyD

Umm.. Yes it is. 'uve' is the plural form of 'uva'.

Edit: see here: https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/uva#Noun_4

uva f (plural uve)

  1. grape
  2. (collective noun) grapes
July 17, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Berto29441

I am sorry for the Qgik

May 8, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Hadeslorster

Duolingo is really useless on this. I have been marked wrong for "grape" and "grapes" on different occassions! What am I meant to be, psychic????

June 2, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Berto29441

The contributors of the course are more than one: it depends on which of them gives the reply. It seems that the language is open to question....

June 2, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Jay977736

Inconsistency destroys the lessons' validity

October 1, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw

You are correct that there are multiple contributors, but the replies are made by the computer matching your answer to those in the database. But network noise and some other factors mean that correct answers are occasionally marked wrong.

February 7, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/Lisa79533

Agreed! If they meant grapes then use the correct term. Uve.

February 19, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/GigiGottwald

"I eat the grape" was marked wrong. If only "the grapes" is correct, then how do I express "I eat THE grape" if I only eat one single grape?

June 6, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Berto29441

"I eat a grape", as "grape" mean a berry (berry (n.) Old English berie "berry, grape," from Proto-Germanic basjom , source also of Old Norse ber, Middle Dutch bere, German Beere "berry;" Old Saxon winberi, Gothic weinabasi "grape", OED), of* grapes

June 6, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/DerekSimms

This response has very minimal reference to GigiGottwald's comment and question. Minimal.

June 18, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Berto29441

47 comments on this simple sentence mean that BrE is an unknown language not only for me. I gave a complete response. If " a grape", at least in BrE, means one berry of the fruit called "grapes" (= uva), I cannot translate with "a grape" what is a bunch of grapes, ( I.: un grappolo d'uva) . Unable to understand? I'm sorry but de hoc, satis.

June 18, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Berto29441

Many minus, not ONE "Why?"

October 1, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/DonNaples1

You said that uva is undersood to be grapes pkural. In a previous lesson you had: È l'uva as They are grapes. ??????

April 8, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Sendell89

L'uva is in the singular, so my answer should be accepted.

June 22, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/infinitebuffalo

If you actually want to contact staff to suggest your answer should be given, use the 'report' button (location varies by platform, but it's usually right next to the 'comment' button that brought you here). The people who have the ability to respond to such reports rarely read these forums.

June 23, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/vitorrsx

Why I can't use "I eat grape"?

September 12, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/infinitebuffalo

Because that's not a valid English sentence. We say "I eat grapes" ('in general, grapes are a food I consume'), or "I eat the grape" ('this grape here, I am eating').

(Also, because you've left out the "l'", which means 'the'.)

September 12, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/Jay977736

Sorry, you would never say this great. I am eating you would say I am eating this grape here, although that wouldn't be very good grammar either. Leave off the here for best results

October 1, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Jay977736

grape not great (typo)

October 1, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/-Nikhil

I was under the impression " l' " (for " the ") was denoting a masculine gender and " la " (for "the") was feminine? (e.g. L'uomo = The man ; La donna = the woman) The hint says " uva " is feminine yet you say " l'uva "

Have I missed the boat here?

March 24, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/infinitebuffalo

You are right that 'la' is the feminine article, but the masculine 'the' is either 'il' or 'lo', depending on the first sound of the noun itself. Both masculine and feminine articles contract to l' before a vowel. See https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Italian_grammar#Articles for more on forms for 'the' (and also 'a/some') in Italian.

(Note that there are three /more/ forms for 'the' in the plural, as well....)

March 24, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Perda_

join italian duolingo group on facebook https://www.facebook.com/groups/1472204489663648/

May 13, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Dorka205209

L' is the article before nouns that start with a vowel. L'elefante (masculine) l'acqua (feminine). For nouns that start with a consonants, La is feminine and il and lo are the masculine ones. You use lo is the noun starts with s + another consonant (lo studente), the noun starts with a z (lo zaino) or y (lo yogurt).

July 17, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Girishkorgaonkar

Will the translation of "eat the grapes" be "mangio gli uva" since grapes in plural here?

July 17, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/infinitebuffalo

There are a couple different things going on here:

  • Italian has several different ways of saying 'the' in the plural. the relevant one here is le uve, because 'uva' is feminine. (both the masculine il and feminine la become l' before an initial vowel, thus l'uva and le uve but l'oggetto and gli oggetti.)
  • however, in Italian 'grapes' is a collective noun. In general, unless referencing a specific number of grapes eaten, you would use l'uva even if you were eating an entire bunch of grapes.
  • mangio specifically means "I eat"--as in Spanish, while English must make the subject explicit, in Italian it can be assumed from the conjugation. If you want "[to] eat the grapes", the infinitive form, it would be mangiare l'uva. The imperative, as in "Eat the grapes!", would be mangia [tu] l'uva.
July 17, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/tsenyyy

why can't i say La uva or il uva or lo uva?? please someone explain

February 20, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/infinitebuffalo

it would have to be 'la', because 'uva' is feminine.

however, in Italian both the singular articles, the masculine il and the feminine la (lo is also a form of il) become l' before an initial vowel, thus l'uva and l'oggetto.

February 20, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Berto29441

Not il or lo because "uva" is feminine, you could say "la uva", but the apostrophised form (l'uva) is normally used.

July 12, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/The_iCONer

You read one thing, and you read something similar later on, ringing the bell of familiarity. The Italian word for grape is eerily similar to the anatomical body part uvula, which is Latin for "grape". Déjà vu.

June 1, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Berto29441

It's not "eerily": uvula is the diminutive of uva, (= an "acinus" of grapeS, that today is the Italian "uGola) from the similarity with it

June 1, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/ReneeRaffini

So I write grapes one time & its maked wrong, then when I write grape, you mark it wrong again. Make up your mind!

June 1, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Hilary685903

Half the time on this, I say "eats the grape" and it says it should be "eats the grapes" and the other half it's the other way around... how do I know if it should be "eats the grape" or "eats the grapes"??

June 10, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Berto29441

Giving a look to a good dictionary (and reading the comments already given)

June 10, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/CarolineDe300655

But...l'uva means the grape, or, the grapes, so how do I know which one it is?! As in Io mangio l'uva. Big sigh

June 11, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/infinitebuffalo

As noted above, in general, unless referencing a specific number eaten, you would use l'uva even if you were eating an entire bunch of grapes.

If you need to specifically say that you are only eating one grape, you would say mangio un'uva or mangio un chicco d'uva.

Otherwise, you'll just need to get used to the fact that Italian and English are different, and there are certain things that one language considers a count noun that the other considers a mass noun, and vice versa. Italian talks about grapes the way English talks about milk: We don't say "I drink a milk", we say "I drink a unit of milk". Italian, similarly, uses chicco (berry) as a unit of grapes.

June 11, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/passionfruit12

so I'll have to remember grapes is to Italian like deer is to English.........

September 7, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/infinitebuffalo

eh, not really. Deer is just an irregular plural; like many animal names in English (especially game animals), it's the same whether you're referring to one or several of them.

Italian uva is maybe more like grass. If you want to refer to a single unit of grass, you say a blade of grass. An entire yard is still just grass -- grasses is usually something different, like the entire collection of related plants. See, for example, the caption for the photo on the right at https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Poaceae#Ecology -- "A kangaroo eating grass".

September 7, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Berto29441

Perfect. I think that English doesn't have a clear distinction between grape and grapes and they don't use " bunch of grapes", expression that clearly says that a single berry of grapes is a grape....

September 8, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/SelenaBlade

Could be "una uva" means one grape (singular) while "l'uva" means the grapes (plural)?

February 15, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw

Actually there is no una uva, for the most part. A single grape is called either un acino or un chicco d'uva. The latter means a grain of grapes. I guess they don't think much about a single grape. It takes a lot of grapes to make a glass of Chianti or Lacrima Christi.

February 16, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/Berto29441

NO

February 16, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/brianna.to

I was not given the plural form as an option, only the singular grape

April 15, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/infinitebuffalo

'Uva' is (generally) singular, as discussed above.

April 16, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Perda_

join italian duolingo group on facebook https://www.facebook.com/groups/1472204489663648/

May 13, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Itsisa13

i put "i eat a grape" instead of "i eat the grape" i dont understand how i got it wrong because it still means the same thing

October 13, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Jus1022

"a grape" would be "un' uva"while "the grape" is "l' uva". A is translated by un/uno/una/un'. The is translated by il/lo/la/l'/

March 21, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Berto29441

No. "Uva" is a cluster of grapes (1 grape = 1 berry you can count in 1 bunch of grapes). In fact you can buy 1 apple, not a grape..

May 8, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/mopsustherobin

Yes, but you can still just eat one grape only.

July 11, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Berto29441

Surely, but in this case, in Italian, you have to say "Mangio un chicco d'uva" and the sentence says "mangio l'uva"

July 12, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Berto29441

Surely. Meanwhile "chicco" can refer also to grains in general (un chicco di frumento =wheat, d'orzo = barley, d'avena = oats, di caffè = coffee, etc.) or to certain fruits (un chicco di melograno = of pomegranate), "acino" refers, especially, to the grapes. So you can say "gli acini di quest'uva sono molto grossi = the grapes of this bunch of grapes - that sounds funny for me, but I don't know how I should say - are very big. Acinus, which is the E. botanical term, comes from the Greek àkinos (= with a spike) from the form of the "seeds" (the true fruits) inside the grape. And thanks for your words.

July 12, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/mopsustherobin

Thanks, that's the clearest explanation in all this discussion! Can you also say "un acino"?

July 12, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Berto29441

Yes, also àcino (tonic stress on the "a")

October 1, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/michael582015

No! But you can eat one grape

October 1, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Berto29441

It isn't so.

September 8, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Jeffrey855877

There are two accepted versions here:
"I eat grapes"
and
"I eat the grape" (Accepted 11 Apr 2018)

If you want to say, "I eat the grapes", meaning like a handful of grapes, you could say io mangio le uve I done context searches and gotten a lot of Italian sentences which use plural uve.

The only thing I'm not certain of if whether "I eat the grape" is a weird, stylized way of saying "I eat grapes".

In English, we can say "He is a fan of the grape". What that means is that "he drinks lots of wine - way too much wine to be healthy" or "He is a true wine connoisseur; he loves to drink wine and knows a lot about them." In either case, "the grape" is a collective noun signifying an uncountable, plural quantity of grapes.

I just don't know

April 11, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/DonNaples1

Thanks for your post. I will keep an eye on this and talk to some of my more knowledgeable Italian friends. In any case I am gaining knowledge.

April 11, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Berto29441

This is not what English dictionaries say

May 8, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Berto29441

A minus? I reply: This is NOT what a good English dictionary says. An Oxford Dic. says: "Grape" = a berry growing in clusters on vines, used for making wine: a bunch of grapeS ( = un grappolo d'uva)

June 18, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/SharBDoll

I said "I eat the grape" and was marked wrong. If it were plural why didn't it say "uve"

May 31, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/CarolineDe300655

But I put "I eat the grape" and it has been marked wrong!

June 1, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/JosephT.Madawela

" I eat the grape" isn't accepted. I personally eat one grape.Then it is uva but if i feel like it,i eat grapes then shouldn't it be 'uve'?

June 2, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Berto29441

No, and the reply has already been given. If you had an E-I dictionary and you look for "grape", you find: "Grape,n. = 1 acino; chicco d'uva (= NOT UVA, but a "berry, an acinus, a grape of uva); 2 (= grapevine) vite; 3 (pl.) uva: a bunch of grapes, un grappolo d'uva". Uve means two or more different kinds of uva. You can say that a certain wine is made with "differenti uve" = with the grapeS of different species of vine

June 3, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Chris51511

So drink wine ((-:

July 21, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/michael582015

Shouldn't that be l'uve. L'uva is surely singular

August 19, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/MarkLennox3

what if you are offered a single grape

August 29, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/SusanF2

Duo Lingo frustrates the heck out of me

September 9, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Erated8

Correct Me If I'm Wrong, But "L'" Can't Be Used Before A Plural.

September 25, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/infinitebuffalo

you're not wrong, but you're also missing the point. Uva isn't plural.

Uve is the grammatical plural, and it does indeed take le, but as discussed several times on this page, Italian in general uses l'uva for an entire bunch of grapes.

To refer to what in English we would call an individual grape, in Italian you would say something like "a grape bean", un chicco d'uva, or "a grape berry", un acino d'uva.

September 26, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/SeanMeaneyPL

Indeed, you've hit the nail on the head. Number is a strange thing in language, and can be as unpredictable as gender. A German girl is grammatically neuter, an Irish stallion is feminine and a cailín (girl) is masculine. Is news singular or plural? Can you have two [cutleries]?

Italian uva is a singular noun expressing a plural idea, rather like "oats" in English. You can eat wheat or barley, but you can't eat an oat.
French has the same idea. A bunch of grapes = un raisin (singular) . An individual grape = un grain de raisin. Latin has botrum (singular) = a bunch of grapes and botrus as an individual grape.

Ain't life fun?

October 1, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/MaffeiAngels

Thank you, excellent breakdown and examples.

February 3, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/Jay977736

This is wrong it says the grapes not the grape

October 1, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/lornasomers

Why is this not marked correctly as single grape

October 5, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/LARISA210496

I eat the grape.

October 10, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/SkylarBrot1

lol

October 24, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Arpik1

grape should be accepted!!

December 3, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/mayrarocio33

Why wouldn't it accept grape instead of grape?

December 6, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Geojulie

I am using the keyboard, thus no hints. The singular should be accepted!

December 14, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Lisa79533

I wrote He eats the grape and was marked wrong. What is the difference between grape and grapes? Is there a difference between the two in written form? How should one know from this sentence whether or not it should be one or the other? Both should be accepted.

February 19, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw

You got into trouble before you even hit the words l"uva. Io mangio is I eat, not he eats. But yes there is a difference between grape and grapes in the written form. L'uva does refer to grapes in the plural. If you want to indicate a single grape in Italian, it is called either ancino or chicco d'uva. The latter means grain of grape.

https://www.collinsdictionary.com/dictionary/english-italian/grape

February 19, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/Lisa79533

O Dio, of course, how silly. What a dumb mistake. I just realized what I did. Grazie.

February 19, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/shirldog

I cant get past this, why????

February 23, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw

It should not be a problem as long as you remember that l'uva is actually translated as the plural grapes, not grape.

February 23, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/annenanny

the definite article cannot be shortened for a plural noun? So surely it is one grape.

February 26, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/Berto29441

The 96th (wrong) comment! Congratulations

February 26, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw

No. It's just a mass noun. Uva is a singular noun in Italian. It simply translates to a plural one in English. If you want to talk about a single grape in Italian you have to say acino or chicco d'uva. Your English brain will only take you so far, so you have to remember to examine all your assumptions.

February 26, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/Kate374867

Don't agree with this one

March 5, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/passosla

Uva is singular

April 10, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw

Uva is singular in gramatical Form, but plural in meaning. If you want to talk about a single grape in Italian, you have to say either acino, or chicco d'uva. Acino can also mean bead. It is just an oddity of Italian.

April 10, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/AuntieE

I would have had a perfect score last time if you spoke more clear

May 31, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Charles.Oliveira

There isn't a pattern here absolutely.

December 25, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Elisabeth604887

grappe should be accepted, cause in italien there are only uva, for singular or plural.

July 30, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/meredithedgar

This question is designed poorly.

January 16, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/LenaSamuel

This must be incorrect. To me it's singular.

January 20, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/Cangurina777

Io mangio uva = I eat grapes/ Io mangio l'uva = I eat the grape.

March 4, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw

No. Io mangio uva is just grammatically incorrect. Io mangio l'uva is I eat grapes. The single grape is called un acino or un chicco d'uva.

March 4, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/Berto29441

Right the last sentence, wrong the first one. If you ask me "What do you eat as fruit at the end of the meal?" I can reply: " I eat apples (plural) or uva". (NOT uve)

March 26, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/Susanna376709

I have to admit, as a Spanish teacher, I'm pretty picky about singular & plurals & I typed "I eat the grape," because I knew "uve" is plural. They should fix this. LOL!

March 26, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw

The problem is that what you "knew" is actually not correct. Despite the singular form, the Italian word uva is actually plural, except in a compound noun like uva spina (gooseberry) and uva passa (raisin), so I guess there must be an uve(?). But to refer to a single grape you must say acino or chicco d'uva. It does not really make sense, but that's hardly unusual between languages.

https://www.collinsdictionary.com/dictionary/english-italian/grape

March 26, 2019

Related Discussions

Learn Italian in just 5 minutes a day. For free.