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"Questi si comprano al centro commerciale."

Translation:These are bought at the shopping mall.

September 8, 2013

20 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/adamdiangelo

"One buys these…" "You buy these…" "They buy these…" are all acceptable English translations. Get it together, Duolingo.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Marninger

Questi = These
si comprano = buy themselves ~ are bought
al centro commerciale = at the shopping center

One buys these = Si compra questi
You buy these = Tu compri questi
They buy these = Loro comprano questi


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Keith352848

All of these that Marninger is delineating seem like a better fit than what Duolingo is insisting, which appears to imply that the things are buying themselves.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/German4me22

I agree fully, all are used in common speech.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mikescolaro

why is the third person plural "comprano"-they buy, translated into the past tense-are bought? Why not "questi si hanno comprato"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/orangeant86

See Viaggiatore's comment above. 'si comprano' = 'are bought'

'Are bought' is not past tense, it's passive tense. Past tense would be 'were bought'.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Angie922492

Thank you! I didn't understand the use of the word "bought" and also assumed it was past tense. I speak English well BUT was never very good at all of the grammar rules. So, while attempting to learn a new language, I am beginning to understand how little I understand about my own language. OY VEY!!!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AntonyHodgson

Since 'questi' is plural, I'm curious as to why it's not 'Questi ci comprano' rather than 'Questi si comprano'.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Viaggiatore

The difference between "ci" and "si" has nothing to do with the difference between singular and plural. "SI" is the right pronoun here because it's the third person reflexive pronoun. Si lava = He washes himself; si lavano = they wash themselves; but ci laviamo = we wash ourselves. The reflexive form is also used to form the passive: Si lava = he is washed; si lavano = they are washed. The passive is what you have here.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/aidandeno

Passive tense. Nice.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BampaOwl

I Am Not a Grammar Expert. But yes, the construction in English is certainly Passive. Passive (and Active) are Voices, not Tenses. The Italian here looks like a Reflexive verb though - comprarsi? Perhaps someone who is an expert can explain more!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MichaelC34941

Thanks for introducing the passive completely out of the blue...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GillianMaud

"Centre" in UK English


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ToddDowty

Can anyone explain why "they buy these ones..." is wrong?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ToddDowty

Google translate tests: the English of what DL want (these are bought at...) gives "questi sono acquistati presso il centro commerciale". Totally different!! Pop in the italian DL uses here (questi si comprano al...) and, sure enough, we get back to DL's English. I'm guessing an Italian speaker would be able to advise..? Please!!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ToddDowty

Thanks for the vote down. Helpful.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pinky738990

Another steange statement. We bought these; these came from; you can buy these at....all more sensible and more likely in conversation.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RobertWill713455

The speaker is pronouncing "commerciale" as commeNciale" with an "N" sound


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MartinaNic136314

In the UK this would translate as 'shopping centre'.

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