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"Usted no se fue de mi casa."

Translation:You did not leave my house.

5 years ago

43 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/mitcorb

The order of the hints for fue were not in favor of go from or leave.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PenguiN42

You shouldn't be relying on the hints. But this is a weird one: the past tense of "ser" (to be) and "ir" (to go) are exactly the same. Irse in this case means to leave.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ari101
ari101
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Aghhhhh, why does it do this to us... there I 'was' thinking... 'You were not yourself of/from my house'??? ;-) It's tough from a listening perspective that to go / to be use the same form in the past. Oh well another one to try remember! :-)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bajaca
bajaca
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I think if you want to talk about going to a place you use ir. If you want to talk about leaving or going from a place you use irse i.e. the reflexive. The translation can not be ser because ser is not used for physical locations. You need to use estar in the example - you were at my house

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PenuelX

Could "irse" also mean to depart? "Se ... fue de" only makes sense to me if it translates to "departed from."

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bajaca
bajaca
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Yes definitely

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/wyzra
wyzra
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I saw this in another lesson (clitics) as well. I think it's just that "ir" changes meaning in the reflexive (i.e., when you add se to the beginning), to make "irse," which means leaving instead of going. It seems to be a feature of Spanish with no English parallel.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/theartoflogic

Which verb is the past tense "fue" from in this sentence, "ir" or "ser?"

ir - voy / I go (present) - fue / I went (past)

ser - soy / I am (present) - fue / I was (past)

Where does "leave" come in?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ferngordon

Both 'ir' and 'ser' have the same past tense, you just have to understand the context to know which one is being used.

The 'fue de', I believe, would mean 'go from' as in to have 'went from', and 'go from' more or less means the same as 'leave'.

Hope that helps.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Len_H
Len_H
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"You did not go my house" does not make any sense in English. It is either "you did not leave my house" or the the very different meaning of "you did not go to my house", thanks

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jaspet

why is "you were not in my house" wrong?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/telemetry
telemetry
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The se is the clue, if you see se fue it usually (always?) implies ir rather than ser.

Irse is a special version of ir, the se changes the meaning - in this case it becomes 'leave' instead of just 'go'. There are lots of verbs that have this variation (like quedar and quedarse), you just have to learn them and what the variations mean.

(The meaning you're going for would require estar instead of ser anyway, but I wanted to point out the general idea of picking up on that se)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jdabell
jdabell
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'go from' amd 'leave' are synonymous

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rmcgwn

Se fue is the third person conjugated verb of irse so there is no question that it means leave. I am just getting that now.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyuchiBigfox

Why does everyone in the comments keep talking about "ir"? I see no "ir" anywhere in the sentence "Usted no se fue de mi casa."

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PryncessAnna

Because "Fue" is the past tense of both "IR" and "ser".

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AhmedMetwa547013

What is "se" doing here?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DeutchesReich
DeutchesReich
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Explain the word "se" please at all

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kumar.Listo

Surprisingly, Duolingo does not accept "you did not go out of my house" as correct!

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rmcgwn

I believe that would be the verb. 'salir'= to go out.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jaxlyn

Can someone explain this please?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EntNinja

Can this mean both "you did not leave my house" and "you did not leave from my house"?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/telemetry
telemetry
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2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EntNinja

Thanks!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DarrylO.Wi

No se?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BasslineJo

Why is "you have not left my house" wrong?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AhmedMetwa547013

I didnt get that one

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BoredWithDuoNow

I really find it difficult to assimilate the , se, in sentences. It modifies the meaning of a verb in many cases and in just wondering how a native pictures the meaning of, se, in their mind's eye as they are talking and listening.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gearloose55

How does one say: "You were not from my house" in Spanish?

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hertn
hertn
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I thought it had something to do with not knowing, as it had "no se" in it. So I answered "you didn't know my house" Spanish is weird.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/telemetry
telemetry
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Doing another reply since this is more useful info - irse is a really important version of ir, which basically means 'leave (a place)' or 'go away'. You need to get used to seeing things like se fue and immediately thinking 'he/she/it/usted left' or whatever. Me voy means 'I'm leaving'.
https://spanish.yabla.com/lessons.php?lesson_id=444

Se actually comes up a lot - it's a reflexive pronoun (that's a link), and that form is used for the Spanish equivalent of phrasing like in 'books sold here' - aquĆ­ se vende libros. Most of the time, se won't mean 'I know', and it'll be followed by a conjugated verb, like se vende or se fue.

Once you get the pattern, you'll know what's basically happening grammatically, even if you don't know what the verb means!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hertn
hertn
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Thanks! This is really helpful!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/telemetry
telemetry
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You could read no se as 'I don't know', but then the rest of the sentence wouldn't make sense grammatically - it would say something like "you I don't know went from my house" (or "you I don't know were from my house" since ir and ser both become fue).

I mean that doesn't make sense as an idea, but the grammar is more important, because when something breaks the rules you know you're on the wrong track. "I don't know went" just sounds wrong, right? You don't have two conjugated verbs together like that, and you don't have to understand the rest of the sentence to realise something's up. That way you can take a step back, look at it again, and maybe you'll read it the right way and all the other pieces will fall into place.

That's how your mind parses English sentences, even if you don't realise it! Your mind works really quickly to resolve any confusion or ambiguity about what you're reading or hearing
Time flies like an arrow; fruit flies like a banana.
You just have to develop that familiarity with Spanish so your brain is agile enough with all the pieces. So you go from not realising anything's wrong, to noticing problems, to letting your brain automatically handle it like with your first language. Languages are full of weirdness and humans are good at dealing with it

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sparkling_sonic

I'm your wife, so why are you kicking me out?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Karen62272

I speak spanish stupid peaple

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lesorton

"Irse" according to google is go

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Froosje
Froosje
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Translation gave "went", so why is that not correct?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rmcgwn

I found this in my dictionary. Ella se fue ayer She went away yesterday.

So if you said 'went away' I think it should be accepted.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ngarrang
ngarrang
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se fue does not offer the hint of ' to leave'.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Theodorus51

Why is "you did not left my house". Is wrong. The word left is okay. I hate those stupid translations in Duolingo. I want to learn Spanish and not English. True Duolingo I start to hate English.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/telemetry
telemetry
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It's you left/you did not leave. You use the root of the verb when it's negative

Yeah you're learning Spanish, but Duo needs to check your translation. If your English is incorrect, then maybe you didn't understand the Spanish. Duo is a computer program, it's not smart like a real teacher, so it has to be careful.

It's better to say "wrong" when there's a problem, so you can fix it. If you're making mistakes because you don't understand the Spanish, and Duo ignores it, you never learn!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Theodorus51

I understand what they say in Spanish. I can translate in my language. But translation in English. When I look to the first option Duolingo gives for a word and I use that word, many times Duolingo says that it's wrong. It's happening every time in Duolingo. I take the first option. No, it has to be the second. Many of the option in Duolingo are wrong.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bjlester

'go from' and 'leave' are interchangeable in English.

5 years ago